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Why Choose
Cedar Crest?
  • Personalized attention
  • Average class size <20
  • Women's leadership opportunities
  • Flexibility to add dual major, minor

Faculty & Staff

Kerrie Baker, Ph.D

Psychology Department Chair / Associate Professor
Curtis Hall, 122 A
Ext. 3426
kqbaker@cedarcrest.edu

[more]

Education

B.S. in Psychology, Pennsylvania State University
M.S. in Psychology, Old Dominion University
Ph.D in Industrial/Organizational Psychology, Old Dominion University

Memberships

American Psychological Society Society for Industrial/Organizational Psychology Society for Teaching of Psychology Society for Human Resource Management

Career Highlights

Dr. Baker practiced applied psychology for over ten years in private and public organizations before coming to Cedar Crest College. She began her career as an Intern and Research Specialist for Bell Atlantic, and then was a management consultant for the Hay Group, a nationally recognized consulting firm. For the next six years, Dr. Baker served as a Personnel Research Psychologist for the Federal Bureau of Investigation, in which she gained a broad range of experience in the areas of Psychology, Business, and Criminal Justice.

Courses Taught

Dr. Baker coordinates the Industrial/Organizational Psychology concentration in the Psychology major. She regularly teaches Experimental Methods, Statistics, Applied Research, Careers in Psychology, Psychology in Current Events and Industrial/Organizational Psychology-related courses such as Psychology of Work, Women in the Workplace, Team Building and Group Dynamics and Ergonomics.

Research Interests

Her research interests include: assessment and program evaluation; the functioning of teams under stressful conditions, and the acceptance of non-traditional team members; the unique challenges faced by organizations in hiring and retaining the newest generation of employees; critical issues faced by women in the workplace, and the characteristics of women leaders and entrepreneurs.

Why Choose Cedar Crest?

"Cedar Crest College offers a supportive environment for students to learn and grow, as individuals, leaders, and members of the community. It is a warm atmosphere with wonderful people and plenty of opportunities for students to take courses in different areas, learn new skills, and prepare onself for the next steps of their life. Assistance is always available and friendly faces make it inviting and pleasant."

Advice

"Take advantage of every opportunity to try new things, learn new information, and investigate all of the options and possibilities you have. Take classes, but also do more, such as internships, research experiences, study abroad, sports or intramural activities, clubs, etc. Get involved and figure out your interests, values, and goals."

Inspiration

"I like challenges and learning new things. So when I see students who are trying, working hard, and wanting to do their best to learn, I work with them to ensure they succeed. So I am inspired by students who may be dealing with issues in their lives that may affect their studies, but work hard to overcome their challenges and persevere for a positive outcome."

How Did You Become a Teacher?

"I occasionally trained Agents on various topics at the training center at Quantico. I realized that it was very satisfying when they understood the material I was teaching and could use it in the field. So then I had an opportunity to teach a class at Penn State and felt the same satisfaction. I enjoyed talking and connecting with the students, so when an opportunity came along to teach full-time, I decided to change my career path and have been at Cedar Crest College for 10 years!"

Sharon Himmanen, Ph.D

Assistant Professor
Curtis Hall, 117
Ext. 3416
sahimman@cedarcrest.edu

[more]

Education

B.A., Washington College
Ph.D, City University of New York

Career Highlights

Prior to coming to Cedar Crest College, Dr. Himmanen taught as an adjunct instructor of Psychology at Hunter College and Lehman College in New York, and spent two years as a substitute assistant professor at Queens College in New York. For nearly twenty years she worked on a series of NIH and NSF funded projects with Dr. Karyl Swartz. These projects were among the first to use video monitors fitted with touch-sensitive screens to study cognitive processes in non-human primates, and included investigations in list learning and concept learning in rhesus and stumptail monkeys and the use of strategies for list learning in rhesus monkeys and orangutans.

During this time, Dr. Himmanen studied face perception and memory for conspecific faces as well as mirror behavior by rhesus monkeys. Dr. Himmanen has also conducted research with human participants providing data on familiarity, visual complexity, name agreement and imagineability for items on the Boston Naming Task, a diagnostic tool often used to the assessment of individuals with impairments caused by cerebral pathology.

Courses Taught

Dr. Himmanen teaches Experimental Methods, Statistics, Learning, Motivation and Emotion, Introduction to Biological Psychology, and Comparative Animal Behavior, and supervises student research projects.

Research Interests

Her research interests include face perception and recognition in human participants.

Why Choose Cedar Crest?

"I attended a small, liberal arts college much like Cedar Crest College as an undergraduate. It was there, with the help of my professors, that I discovered a passion for the scientific study of behavior. When it came time to move to a full-time teaching career, I thought of my professors and what an enormous impact they had on my life, and wanted to do the same for a new generation of students. Cedar Crest College was exactly what I was looking for, a small, liberal arts college."

Advice

Critical thinking skills are the most important thing you will learn in your college career. A liberal arts education is not solely about facts and figures, it is about using facts and figures to learn how to think and solve problems.

How Did You Become a Teacher?

"Teaching is part of every graduate student's training. The first course I taught by myself was a statistics course over the summer that I ended up with at the last minute. I was a nervous wreck about it, but my mentor assured me I would be great at it. Also, while I was preparing the course, I thought back to my undergraduate professors, and used them as models for how to teach. I quickly got over my concerns about public speaking and teaching, and the course was the first of many wonderful experiences teaching undergraduates. The decision to become a college professor was actually a graduate one for me--I saw a future for myself in the research field. But as I taught more and more, I realized I enjoyed it just as much as research."

Diane Moyer, Ph.D.

Professor
Curtis Hall, 123
Ext. 3425
dmmoyer@cedarcrest.edu

[more]

Education

B.A. in Psychology, LaSalle University
M.A. in Counseling Psychology, University of Massachusetts
M.A., University of Pennsylvania
Ph.D in Counseling Psychology, Temple University

Memberships

American Psychological Association, Eastern Psychological Association, International Positive Psychology Association

Career Highlights

Dr. Moyer is a Licensed Psychologist and received specialized training in working with children and adolescents at the Children's Hospital in Columbus, Ohio. She holds memberships in the American Psychological Association, and the American Counseling Association and has published in several journals.

Dr. Moyer was a member of the USA Field Hockey Team and competed in the World Cup Championships. She was a member of the 1980 and 1984 Olympic Teams. Her 1984 Olympic Team won the Bronze Medal in Los Angeles.

Courses Taught

General Psychology, Principles of Helping Relationships, Counseling Children, Abnormal Psychology, Psychological Testing, Positive Psychology

Micah Sadigh, Ph.D.

Professor
Curtis Hall, 119
Ext. 3715
micasa@cedarcrest.edu

[more]

Education

B.A., Moravian College
Ph.D, Lehigh University

Factual Highlights

"I was profoundly influenced by my psychology professors when I was a student in college. I began conducting psychology research as an undergraduate student, which laid the foundation for much of my work for years to come. Although I spent nearly 10 years as a Behavioral Medicine Psychologist at hospital settings, teaching and research remained as two areas which I excelled in, which actually made me a better clinician. I have been teaching at Cedar Crest College since 1998. I was an adjunct professor during the first two years and became a full time faculty in 2001."

Memberships

Dr. Sadigh holds a Diplomate status in Franklian Psychology, which was awarded to him by the International Viktor Frankl Institute. He is a Fellow of the International College of Psychosomatic Medicine and is a member of the Academy of Psychosomatic Medicine, the Society for Existential Analysis, and the American Psychosomatic Society.

Courses Taught

Currently, Dr. Sadigh is teaching courses in Theories of Personality, Systems of Psychotherapy, Health Psychology, Mind-Body Medicine, Stress & Disease, The Psychology of Anxiety, Existential Psychology, and History and Systems of Psychology.

Research Interests

Dr. Sadigh's interests lie in clinical, biological, health, and existential psychology. His publications include work on sleep disorders, personality disorders, applied psychophysiology, stress and disease, the psychological treatment of pain, post traumatic stress disorder, and an existential approach to the treatment of psychosomatic disorders.

Publications

He is the author of three books, which includes Autogenic Training: A Mind-Body Approach to the Treatment of Fibromyalgia and Chronic Pain published by Haworth Medical Press. He is also a published poet and an accomplished composer. In addition to his publications, he frequently lectures at state and national conferences.

Why Choose Cedar Crest?

"My undergraduate training convinced me that the liberal arts can play a significant role in one's personal as well as professional development. I am also very much dedicated to the education of women. Some of my important role models in life were women. Cedar Crest College is a perfect place where I can be service to our students as well the future of higher education."

Advice

"Discover yourself! Self-discovery is one of the most important aspects of higher education, which leads to a better understanding of one's innate gifts and potentialities. Without self-knowledge, external circumstances, which are always in flux, determine one's destiny in life. With self knowledge, you create your future!"

Inspiration

"My college professors, great writers, good research, ancient philosophers, my students, life itself!"

How Did You Become a Teacher?

"I was considered an effective tutor when I was in high school. At that time, several of my teachers had predicted that I would be teaching one day. In college I continued to tutor and then became a laboratory assistant in two courses. Students in both courses were very pleased with my ability to teach. My professors were also very supportive and continued to challenge me to plan and develop lectures. Teaching was and is one of my deepest passions."

Jane Tyler Ward, Ph.D.

Professor
Curtis Hall, 121
Ext. 3632
jane@cedarcrest.edu

[more]

Education

B.A., University of Delaware
M.A., University of Delaware
Ph.D, University of Delaware

Memberships

Association of Family and Conciliation Courts Lehigh Valley Psychological and Counseling Association Pennsylvania Psychological Association Eastern Psychological Association

Career Highlights

Dr. Ward is a psychotherapist in private practice, working with individuals and families. Her practice includes forensic evaluations for the courts, court-referred children and families, and she has been an expert witness in child development and memory, adolescent development, and psychology in Lehigh, Northampton, Schuylkill and Monroe counties. Currently she specializes in working with abducted children and serves as an advisor to the Rachel Foundation, an organization dedicated to reintegrating abducted children with their left-behind parents.

Courses Taught

Currently she teaches Lifespan Development, Abnormal Psychology, Theories of Personality, Forensic Psychology, Criminal Behavior and Profiling, and Psychology and Dramatic Literature (an Honor's course).

Research Interests

Her most recent research and presentations in this area have been on deception and the efficacy of criminal profiling.

Administration/Related Experience

She has served Cedar Crest College as Chair of the Psychology Department, Dean of Students, Associate Dean of Faculty, and Associate Vice President for Institutional Research.

Dr. Ward also enjoys riding and showing her Arabian and Half-Arabian horses. She was instrumental in starting the Cedar Crest College Equestrian Team in 1994, and continues to be the faculty advisor to the Team.

James Scepansky, Ph.D.

Associate Professor
Curtis Hall, 118
Ext. 3424
jascepan@cedarcrest.edu

[more]

Education

B.A. in Psychology, Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania
M.A. in Experimental Psychology, Kent State University
Ph.D in Experimental Psychology, Kent State University

Memberships

Eastern Psychological Association Teaching of Psychology (APA Division 2)

Career Highlights

Before joining the faculty at Cedar Crest, Dr. Scepansky taught for one year at Whitman College in Walla Walla, Washington, and for six years at Longwood University in Virginia. Dr. Scepansky has also served as an Adjunct Faculty Member at Hampden-Sydney College in Virginia.

Courses Taught

Dr. Scepansky teaches several classes, including General Psychology, Experimental Design and Statistics, Cognitive Psychology, Social Psychology, Cross-Cultural Psychology, as well as the capstone experience, Psychology Research (Thesis I and II).

Research Interests

Research interests are eclectic, and include impression formation, motivated skepticism, attitudes and persuasion, and social memory. Dr. Scepansky welcomes the opportunity to work with students on research projects in their own areas of interest.

 

Rachel Buckley

Administrative Assistant
Curtis Hall, 125
Ext. 3484
rbuckley@cedarcrest.edu