Cedar Crest College

 

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CATALOG • 2009-2010


Off-Campus Study


Internships

The Career Planning Office offers more than 300 internships for sophomores, juniors and seniors. The main focus of the internship program is to integrate real-world experiences with academic work. Students may even be able to earn college credit. Internship experiences increase the student's personal and career growth through interpersonal and intellectual challenges, acquisition of practical skills and exposure to related work fields. Under the supervision of a faculty member, the organization's representative, and the Career Planning Office, internships supplement classroom education. For more information on internship procedures and requirements, refer to ÒInternship Guidelines,– a publication available in the Career Planning Office in the Allen House and on the Career Planning home page on the Cedar Crest College website or on My CedarCrest. All Students planning to participate in the internship program are encouraged to attend an internship seminar and must complete Internship Contract forms, also available in the Career Planning Office.

Alumnae Museum

Paid internship positions are also available on campus through the College's Alumnae Museum. Located in Curtis Hall, the Cedar Crest Alumnae Museum preserves the history of Cedar Crest College and fosters an appreciation of the history of women. Opened in conjunction with the College's 125th anniversary, the museum collects and preserves memorabilia and other items of importance to the College. Students work as paid interns (and sometimes as paid museum associates) to plan exhibitions using fashions and memorabilia collected since the College's founding in 1867. Students gain a sense of history of the College as well curatory techniques that are applicable in the larger museum community. For more information on internships with the Alumnae Museum, contact the Cedar Crest Alumnae Office at 610-606-4609.


LVAIC Cross Registration

Through the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges (LVAIC), the course offerings and library holdings of five other area private colleges are available to Cedar Crest students. Degree-seeking matriculated upper-class women and non-freshmen in good academic standing may register at other LVAIC institutions for courses not available to them on their home campus. Cross-registration for full-time traditional students is at no additional cost in the Fall and Spring semesters. All Cedar Crest students may use any of the LVAIC libraries at no extra charge. Participating institutions in addition to Cedar Crest include DeSales University, Lafayette College, Lehigh University, Moravian College and Muhlenberg College. For information on cross-registration, see page 36.


Reserve Officer Training Corps (ROTC)

Cedar Crest students are eligible to participate in ROTC courses of study leading, upon graduation, to commissions in the U.S. Army. Course work is offered through the ROTC program at Lehigh University within the terms of the existing cross-registration agreement between member schools of the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges. All ROTC courses are recorded on the Cedar Crest transcript and entered into the quality-point average; thus, they are counted as a part of each semester's hours in determining full-time status. However, only the final six credits earned by successfully completing Military Science 113 – 114 count as electives toward graduation. Cedar Crest students enjoy all the benefits accorded ROTC students at the host institution including eligibility to compete for scholarships covering all tuition, books, and a monthly subsistence allowance. Emphasis in the program is on development of leadership and management skills required of a commissioned officer. No military obligation is incurred by students participating during their freshman year. Further information about Army ROTC is available in the admissions and registrar's offices at Cedar Crest College or from the chairperson of military science at Lehigh University.

Hawk Mountain

Courses are offered at the 2,000-acre Hawk Mountain Sanctuary through an affiliation between Hawk Mountain and the Cedar Crest College biological sciences department.

Students planning to earn academic credit should register through Cedar Crest College. Other interested students should call Hawk Mountain directly at 610-756-6961.


Study Abroad

Students are encouraged to take advantage of the many exciting opportunities available to study abroad. Cedar Crest students may participate in study abroad programs offered through the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges (LVAIC) and other institutions. The College will also assist students in making the necessary arrangements with institutions overseas. In the past few years, Cedar Crest students have enrolled in programs in Australia, England, France, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Mexico and Spain. Students interested in study abroad should contact the Career Planning office, located in the Allen House, and consult the resources available in the study abroad library. Full-time traditional Cedar Crest College students may apply for study abroad scholarships, ranging from $500 to $2,500 for study abroad during a fall or spring semester. For information on study abroad see page 37.


Voluntary Separation From The College

Official Leave of Absence: Degree-seeking (matriculated) students who find it necessary to interrupt their college studies for a term or more must apply for an official leave of absence if they wish to return under the same liberal-arts education requirements. Within 3 years of the student's official date of separation, the student must have accomplished one of the following steps: return to classes, submit a letter of intent to register for the upcoming term, register for the upcoming term, or request an extension of the leave of absence. Leave of Absence Requests are processed on MyCedarCrest via the Withdrawal Application;the Registrar approves requests for leaves of absence.Withdrawals from individual courses are not considered official leaves of absence.

The first day of class attendance, in the case of traditional students, or the date of the acceptance letter as a degree candidate, in the case of Lifelong Learning students, is the date of matriculation. This date is important if a student finds it necessary to interrupt her studies at Cedar Crest.
Official leaves of absence of less than three years permit students to graduate according to the general education requirements in effect at the time they matriculated. With approval from the department in which they are majoring, students may be permitted to graduate according to major requirements listed in the College Catalog and in effect at the time they matriculated at the College. Students may also choose to graduate according to policies and curricular changes enacted by the faculty and found in the most current catalog.

If matriculated students request and are granted an official leave of absence of up to three calendar years, they are not required to reapply for matriculation when they re-enroll at Cedar Crest. Students who re-enter the College after a leave of absence greater than three years, an unofficial withdrawal, or any absence not formally approved, as described above, must meet the general liberal arts requirements and major requirements in effect at the time of their re-enrollment in order to graduate.

Official Withdrawal from Cedar Crest: In order to withdraw officially from Cedar Crest College, all withdrawing students must complete an exit interview, which begins the withdrawal application on My Cedar Crest. Official withdrawal prior to the official deadline for course withdrawal will result in all coursework in progress being graded W (not computed into average). Withdrawal after the official deadline for course withdrawal requires completion of the process for administrative withdrawal. Unofficial withdrawal from the College at any time may result in all coursework in progress being graded F. If the student re-enters the College to continue the major after a withdrawal, the student will graduate according to general education requirements and major requirements in effect at the time of re-enrollment.

Re-admission Policy: Students who apply for readmission to Cedar Crest College after a separation of at least five years may elect, upon readmission, to retain all of their prior grades or to begin their academic career anew, retaining none of their prior grades.

Students who have been dismissed previously from the College must petition for readmission. Students who have been dismissed for poor academic performance must remain separated from the College for at least one calendar year before reapplying for admission.


The Cedar Crest College Liberal Arts Curriculum

The Liberal Arts Curriculum serves as the intellectual foundation for the completion of academic majors and the pursuit of lifelong learning by ensuring that students receive a comprehensive liberal arts education rooted in the Arts, Humanities, and Sciences. A fundamental purpose of the curriculum is to hone the critical thinking skills of students as reflected in their ability to reasonÑscientifically, qualitatively, quantitatively, and morally. Another goal of the curriculum is to develop the communications skills of students as reflected in their ability to express ideas via the written and spoken word and through the use of technology. Ultimately, the Liberal Arts Curriculum intends to help students to acquire knowledge and skills that will foster their thoughtful participation in the various communities to which they belong, personal and professional, local and global.

The Liberal Arts Curriculum requires students to complete a minimum of 40 general education credits distributed across eight areas of knowledge and application.. These requirements apply to all students, regardless of academic major or transfer status. To complete the program, a student must earn a grade of "C" or better in all required coursework. In doing so, students will have demonstrated an acceptable level of academic performance (i.e. proficiency or better) relative to the following general educational outcomes:

  1. An understanding of the Arts, Humanities, and Social and Natural Sciences as distinctive areas of scholarly inquiry and human achievement.
  2. An understanding of how scientific reasoning can be utilized to investigate the natural and physical world.
  3. An understanding of how qualitative and quantitative approaches can be utilized to understand social systems, human culture, and human behavior.
  4. An understanding of how qualitative reasoning can be utilized to interpret the aesthetic qualities and social significance of historical and cultural artifacts, including works of art, literature, and film.
  5. An understanding of how quantitative and logical reasoning skills can be utilized to formulate, interpret, and solve problems.
  6. An understanding of how the Western tradition of ethics can serve as a guide to personal conduct, engaged citizenship, and community service.
  7. An understanding of the complexities and challenges of cross-cultural perspectives within a global context that is shaped by technological interconnectivity and the rapid movement of people, goods, and ideas across national borders.
  8. An understanding of how writing techniques can be utilized to develop and communicate ideas and information to an audience.
  9. An understanding of how public speaking techniques can be utilized to develop and communicate ideas and information to an audience.
  10. An understanding of how technology can be utilized for purposes of data acquisition, analysis, evaluation and presentation.
  11. An understanding of how information can be acquired, analyzed, evaluated and effectively used.

A Cedar Crest College student must complete the following course work to earn a degree.

Requirements for the Liberal Arts Program

Arts   2 courses, one of which must be a 3-credit course   6 credits
Humanities   2 courses   6 credits
Natural Sciences   2 courses, one of which must be a lab-based course   7 credits
Social Sciences   2 courses   6 credits
Ethics   1 course   3 credits
Global Studies   1 course   3 credits
Mathematics & Logic   2 courses, one of which must be a mathematics course   6 credits
Writing   2 courses: WRI 100 or HON 122 and one WRI-2 course   6 credits
        40-43 credits

Transferred courses may be used to satisfy Liberal Arts Curriculum requirements, consistent with the College's transfer policy.

Areas of Knowledge and Application

A. Courses that address areas of scholarly inquiry and human achievement:
Arts: The courses that comprise this category are designed to help students develop an understanding and appreciation for the fine arts, including the visual and performing arts and creative writing. Creating, performing and appreciating works of art define the basis for an aesthetic education. Studio and/or performance experiences help students to develop creative and critical thinking skills whereas appreciation experiences help students to understand the value systems that have developed over the centuries, underpinning the rationale for determining the great works and their creators. While tools and process may differ, the concepts that define the arts are common to all disciplines in this category. The key disciplines in this category are the Fine Arts: Dance, Theater, Music, Creative Writing, and the Visual Arts. Students may select two courses from the same discipline to satisfy the Arts requirement. Disciplines selected in fulfillment of the Arts requirement may not also satisfy requirements in Humanities and Social Sciences.

Humanities: The courses that comprise this category examine the texts produced by human culture in order to understand how these texts have, in the past, reflected and shaped Ð and continue to reflect and shape Ð human thought, including human aspirations and fears. The texts studied by humanistic disciplines include literature and film, philosophical and religious treatises, and historical documents. The method of inquiry employed by humanities disciplines requires a textual analysis that arrives at its understanding by considering the text from multiple perspectives, ranging from the study of the text's language and its implications, to a consideration of historical and cultural contexts, to the situation of a text within a tradition of thought. The key disciplines in this category are Communication, English, History, International Languages, and Philosophy. Students must choose two different disciplines within this requirement. Disciplines selected in fulfillment of the Humanities requirement may not also satisfy requirements in Arts and Social Sciences.

Mathematics and Logic: The courses that comprise this category are designed to engage students in activities that develop analytical skills relating to the formulation, interpretation and solution of quantitatively-based problems or activities which develop logical reasoning skills, including the ability to analyze and critically evaluate arguments from a logical point of view. The key discipline in this category is Mathematics.

Natural Sciences: The courses that comprise this category share a common methodology, in that they explore and study the natural world through the application of the scientific method. This method of inquiry involves critical and objective observation, the formulation and testing of hypotheses, and the critical analysis and interpretation of empirical data. The key disciplines in this category are Biology, Chemistry, Physics, and General Science.
Social Sciences: The courses that comprise this category study human culture and behavior and the institutions within which individuals and groups live, work, learn and act. The mode of inquiry associated with the investigation of the cognitive, political, religious, social, expressive, and economic dimensions of human life is informed by the scientific method, signifying an appreciation of the value and significance of using empirical evidence, hypothesis testing, quantitative analysis and qualitative studies to think critically about the nature of human behavior, institutions and individual development. The key disciplines in this category are Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, and Sociology. Students must choose two different disciplines within this requirement. Disciplines selected in fulfillment of the Social Sciences requirement may not also satisfy requirements in Arts and Humanities.

B. Courses that promote reflection on and engagement with the demands of citizenship within a complex and changing society:
Ethics: The courses that comprise this category are designed to help students develop a working knowledge of the theories and principles underlying the Western tradition of ethics while also engaging students in activities that encourage individuals to reflect systematically on their personal moral beliefs and values. Courses should be interdisciplinary in nature and should focus upon the application of ethical theory to practice, both in the classroom and in experiences beyond the classroom.

Global Studies: The courses that comprise this category introduce students to art, literature, religion, or historical perspectives beyond the American mainstream; diverse cultural practices and beliefs, including health practices and new cultures arising from new technologies and the development of a quasi-borderless world; or the study of economic, political, legal and/or scientific systems or interactions within the context of varied social backgrounds or cultural frameworks.

C. Courses that promote the ability to use writing as a tool for expression and understanding:

Writing: The courses that comprise this category are designed to help students develop the ability to approach a topic for writing in light of the demands of purpose, audience, and the specific requirements of an assignment. Such requirements include skills in these categories: insightful and developed ideas, a supported thesis, awareness of audience and discourse conventions, coherence and logical organization, a sophisticated and professional style, and an attention to the revision process and manuscript preparation.

Students should consult the Registrar's Page on MyCedarCrest for a full list of courses approved for each Liberal Arts designation.


College-wide Requirements Satisfied
Within the Departmental Major

The following requirements will be satisfied by students within the context of individual academic majors. For all requirements, the necessary coursework may be offered directly within the academic major or, alternatively, the academic major may require that students complete an appropriate course or courses offered in a different department.

Technology Requirement: The technology requirement is satisfied through the completion of coursework required within the context of individual academic majors. This approach recognizes that the definition of Òtechnological competenceÓ differs across academic disciplines and fields of specialization; thus each department is responsible for documenting that students enrolled in their programs as majors have demonstrated an acceptable level of academic performance in regard to their ability to: (1) engage in data searches and data organization, (2) engage in data analysis, and (3) engage in data presentation and communication.

Oral Presentation: The oral presentation requirement is satisfied through coursework required within the context of individual academic majors or through the completion of a course designated by the department as satisfying this requirement. Each department is responsible for documenting that students enrolled in their programs as majors have demonstrated an acceptable level of academic performance in regard to their ability to: (1) employ basic skills of good public speaking, (2) conduct an audience analysis, (3) use logic, and (4) demonstrate credibility through the presentation of evidence and the use of proper delivery techniques, including the use of audio-visual materials and appropriate technologies.

Information Literacy Requirement: The information literacy requirement is satisfied through the completion of coursework required within the context of individual academic majors. Each department is responsible for documenting that students enrolled in their programs as majors have demonstrated an acceptable level of academic performance in regard to their ability to: (1) frame a research question, (2) access and evaluate sources, (3) evaluate content, (4) use information effectively to accomplish a specific purpose, and (5) understand the economic, legal and social issues of information use.