Catalog Archive

CATALOG • 2010-2011

COURSES BY DEPARTMENT

ACCOUNTING COURSES

ACC 101 Financial Accounting        3 credits

An introduction and development of the overall accounting function from analysis of business transactions and their systematic recording to the interpretation of the resulting financial statements.  Students also develop decision-making skills based on a set of ethical accounting principles.

ACC 102 Managerial Accounting           3 credits

Building on fundamentals learned in Financial Accounting, students are introduced to several important analytical tools found in business. Topics include the time value of money, the concept of risk, budgeting, costing of products, capital budgeting, debt management, and working capital management.  Students will use computers extensively in order to become comfortable with these tools. Pre-requisite:  ACC 101.

ACC 203 Cost Accounting 3 credits

A study of the principles and practices of job and process cost systems, as well as variable and absorption costing. Emphasis is also placed on standard cost systems as they relate to the accounting system as a whole. Additional topics include an understanding of accounting information system design, variance analysis and flexible and static budgeting. Prerequisites:  ACC 102, MAT 105.

ACC 205 Accounting Information Systems 3 credits

Manual accounting systems are quickly disappearing, and in their place are computers and the complexity of automated databases. This course introduces students to a major computerized accounting package, and provides a framework for establishing and controlling financial information systems through the use of journals, ledgers, trial balances, and financial statements. Using simple flowcharting techniques, students will appreciate how transactions affect an organization, and recognize when management or ethical issues surface. All major business processes are considered including sales, purchases, asset management, inventory, and payroll. Prerequisite:  ACC 102.

ACC 208 Intermediate Accounting I    3 credits

A study of the accounting standards applicable to all corporate balance sheet accounts and their related counterparts. Included in this study is a complete analysis and review of cash and receivables, inventories and cost of goods sold, plant and depreciation, intangibles and amortization, current and long-term liabilities and stockholders equity. Each category reviewed includes conceptual considerations, technical accounting procedures, and the necessary and appropriate disclosure within the body of the financial statements and the related accounting schedules and footnotes. Prerequisites:  ACC 102, CIS 215, MAT 105, BUA 250.

ACC 209 Intermediate Accounting II   3 credits

A study of the application of generally accepted accounting principles to various technical reporting areas within financial statements. Emphasis is placed on technical standards and the necessary disclosure requirements for these reporting areas. Course topics include dilutive and anti-dilutive securities, executive compensation plans, basic and fully diluted earnings per share, corporate investments and accounting for income taxes, employee pensions plans, employee postretirement benefits, leases and accounting changes.  The course concludes with a comprehensive review of financial statement preparation, financial statement analysis and interpretation, full disclosure in financial reporting, and the appropriateness of accounting principles being applied in accounting practice today.  Prerequisites: ACC 208.

ACC 217 Corporate Taxation 3 credits

A study of tax accounting for corporations, partnerships and fiduciaries, including corporate organization, reorganization, distributions and liquidation. Topics include preparation of federal corporate, partnership, and fiduciary returns. Prerequisites: ACC 102, ACC 218.

ACC 218 Personal Income Tax Accounting 3 credits

A study of the preparation of federal income tax returns for individuals and small businesses based on current law, regulations and current decisions. Students are required to research applicable tax law, regulations, and current decisions, using various tax reference services and computer data-base access. Prerequisite ACC 102.

ACC 308 Advanced Financial Accounting 3 credits

A comprehensive analysis and review of the issues relating to various levels of inter-company corporate investments. Students study acquisitions, mergers and consolidations and the applicable financial reporting required for both domestic and international corporations. Additional topics include partnership formation and dissolution and accounting for governmental entities. Prerequisites: ACC 209.

ACC 312 Auditing 3 credits

An analysis and appraisal of current auditing principles and procedures involving staff organization, professional ethics and legal responsibility, internal control, audit programs and working papers and original record examination. Students are required to complete a comprehensive audit case study.  Prerequisites: ACC 209.

 

ANTHROPOLOGY COURSES

ANT 100 Cultural Anthropology  3 credits

A cross-cultural examination of contemporary cultures, especially traditional and developing examples, in a descriptive and comparative framework. Topics covered include the methods and ethics of fieldwork, marriage and kinship systems, production and reproduction, gender roles and relations, forms of conflict resolution and the varieties of religious beliefs and rituals. Generally, two case studies are used in addition to a text.

These cases demonstrate through example the varieties of human arrangements across groups.

ANT 210 Introduction to Archaeology  3 credits

Buried treasure, lost civilizations, Indiana Jones.  Archaeology is very exciting but perhaps in different ways than many people believe.  This course offers a fundamental introduction to the field of archaeology.  Explore the history, theory, and methods of the field of archaeology and the analysis used to reconstruct our human past.  Of particular focus is archaeology as a science and the impact of archaeological discourse and research in contemporary society.  Content will be addressed through lectures, discussions, multi-media presentations, and field experiences.

ANT 215 World Music  3 credits

A review of a broad sample of music from around the world and an investigation of how organized sound reflects and reinforces its cultural source. The many topics include the functions of music, types of instruments and their symbolism, the training of music makers, the meaning of song texts and some of the reasons for musical change. Many regional styles are examined, for example, Native North America, the Caribbean, Africa, the Middle East, South and East Asia. Special attention is given to musical syncretism – the mutual influence of contemporary musical cultures on one another that has produced many new popular forms of music variously called World Beat or Global Pop. Background in music theory is not required.

ANT 219 Human Evolution and Prehistory  3 credits

A course in physical anthropology and archeology that covers the evolution of nonhuman and human primates over the past five million years. The chronological organization of the course includes the development of evolutionary theory in the 19th century, genetic theory in the 20th century, the fascinating story of how small, primitive hominids became upright and brainy tool users, and how eventually cultural evolution began to outstrip biological evolution in human development. Special attention is also given to one species of non-Human ape (as Bonobo). The course ends at 20,000 years ago with the emergence of modern Homo sapiens.

ANT 225 Tourism and Pilgrimage  3 credits

Tourism and pilgrimage are generally regarded as travel for two very different purposes: one for fun and relaxation, the other for spiritual edification through contact with the sacred. But, are they necessarily so far apart? Can a tourist ever be a pilgrim, a pilgrim a tourist? The answer seems to be "yes" in the sense that travelers sometimes do find deeper meaning in a secular journey and end up as "accidental pilgrims." The course reviews the parallel literature on tourism and pilgrimage on theories of sacred and secular travel. The topical issues of the course are explored in selected case studies of tourism and pilgrimage to sacred sites such as Mecca, Jerusalem, and the many in India, as well as secular sites such as battlefields and holocaust museums, celebrity estates (Graceland), and icons of popular culture (Disneyworld). The tourism part of the course considers the impact of tourism (good and bad) in various locals. Field trips are planned to nearby historic sites and a Hindu pilgrimage center.

ANT 235 Internship / Field Experience (to be submitted as Global Studies in LAC) (old Field School in Caribbean Anthropology)  3 - 12 credits

This course allows either an internship or field experience locally or abroad (as with an agency), arranged with the help of a faculty mentor. (ANT 100 is required and ANT 230 – Caribbean or ANT 310 – Women in the Developing World is highly recommended.)

ANT 230 Cultures of the Caribbean  3 credits

A survey of the English, Spanish and French speaking regions of the Caribbean and review of the ethnohistory of the area from pre-colonial times to the present. The first part of the course examines the social and economic impact of colonial rule and the independence movements that arose in response to the plantation system and foreign exploitation of the colonies. The second part focuses on the contemporary cultures of the Caribbean with an examination of domestic arrangements, patterns of work and migration, political conflicts, and vibrant expressive forms such as music and carnival that have made the region such a popular destination for visitors from North America and Europe. Special consideration is given to the impact of tourism and tourism work on the cultures and ecologies of the islands. Case studies of particular islands are used, along with videos.

ANT 250 American Communities in Transition  3 credits

This course uses the classroom and a nearby community to examine changes of an economic and social nature taking places in American society over the recent time. We begin with theory and case studies of community from the late 19th and early 20th century.  We read a case study of a parallel community in transition (as Lowell, Massachusetts), then focus on Bethlehem and the Lehigh Valley: its history as an industrial area, its transitions away from heavy industry, and the use of colonial and industrial industry to create museums and historic sites. Throughout the course, there are several field trips that allow students the opportunity to see and study community dynamics first hand.  Students write a research paper based on fieldwork/ or secondary sources with choice of topic.

ANT 310 Women in the Developing World  3 credits

A survey of different aspects of women’s lives in the developing world with particular attention given to those from the urban underclass and rural peasantry. The assumption is that economic development in the form of foreign aid, technology transfer and industrialization has not benefited women to the same extent as men. The course examines how global restructuring has affected women and their families with respect to employment, education and health. Special focus is given to two issues: how women reconcile their productive and reproductive roles and women’s own attempts to improve the conditions in which they live through mutual co-operation and activism. Case studies are drawn from Latin America, Africa, the Middle East, India and other parts of Asia.

ANT 360  Special Topics/Thesis  3 Credits

Course designation for research and thesis writing for self-designed majors in the senior year.

ANT 390 Independent Study/Thesis  3 credits

Individual research projects, and directed readings carried out under faculty supervision. Generally, it is done in the spring of the senior year, but preparation often begins in the previous fall.

 

ART COURSES

ART 101, 201 Beginning Drawing  3 credits each term

Introduction to the problems and methods of basic drawing, with attention to line, tone, space and composition. Students work from the human figure, still life and landscape using various media. Emphasis is placed on learning to see and on understanding the process of transforming what is seen into art. Students also spend time looking at and talking about the drawings of various artists, both historical and contemporary, to supplement and enrich studio time spent drawing.

ART 105 Introduction to Art History I   3 credits

An introduction to art history, surveying important works with attention to their historical and cultural contexts, this course covers the Paleolithic period through the end of the Medieval period.

ART 106 Introduction to Art History II  3 credits

An introduction to art history, surveying important works with attention to their historical and cultural contexts, this course covers the early Renaissance through the 19th century.

ART 107, 207, 307 Structures in Book Arts 3 credits

This is an introductory course for students to explore aspects of structure through the exploration of bookbinding. Slide presentations, technique demonstrations, handouts, project assignments and critiques allow for exploration and understanding of decorative and functional designs in bookbinding.

ART 110 Principles of Visual Organization 3 credits

An introduction to the basic terminology and phenomena of visual organization studied through a series of lectures, assigned problems and critiques. The course is intended as a cognate course for students in education and communications as well as for students concentrating in studio art or art history.

ART 111, 211, 311 The Printed Image  3 credits each term

An investigation of the various techniques of printmaking, specifically monotype, dry point and intaglio techniques. The technique of bookmaking is introduced in relation to a developed series of images and as an art form with its own history and expressive potential. Projects and class discussions focus on how visual images convey meaning in works of art; how series of images react and respond to one another; and how the book itself as a container of meaning can be visually and conceptually linked to printed images in works of art.

 ART 113, 213, 313 Illustration and Drawing  3 credits each term

The techniques, objectives and qualities of drawing are explored through a series of critical sessions based on out-of-class drawing assignments

ART 123, 223, 323 Painting Studio 3 credits each term

This course focuses on the development of a painterly vocabulary. The problems of direct observation, memory and abstraction are addressed. Students are encouraged to experiment with the painting medium and materials and expected to become familiar with contemporary concerns and relate them to their historical precedents.  Field trips and visiting artists offer insight into contemporary themes and issues.

ART 125, 225, 325 Jewelry and Metalsmithing  3 credits each term

The focus of this course is a deep exploration of the historical and contemporary concepts and processes of jewelry-making and body adornment. Emphasis is placed upon the creation of jewelry as objects of personal language and expression.  The basic jewelry and metalsmithing techniques of construction and casting are demonstrated, learned and utilized in the creation of jewelry-based objects of art.

ART 124, 224, 324 Structures through Papermaking  3 credits each term

The focus of this course is designed to introduce students to the process of making paper with applications in sheet forming, bookbinding and 3D structures. Investigations into the history of papermaking and contemporary applications will supplement the hands on studio environment of this course.

ART 127, 227, 327 Sculpture Studio 3 credits each term

The focus of this course is an introduction to the process, principles and practice of sculpture. The course exposes the student to art and ideas through field trips, visiting artists, reading and presentation together with the creation of sculpture. Emphasis is placed on the development of a personal expression through a thorough understanding of the form.

ART 131, 231, 331 Ceramics Studio 3 credits each term

The focus of this course is an examination of the processes and history of ceramic art in the context of human societal development.  Students utilize the various skills and techniques of wheel-throwing, slab-building, glazing and firing to produce ceramic objects as vehicles of personal expression.

 ART 132,232 InDesign Computer Software Workshop 1 credit each workshop

The focus of this course is an introduction to the basics of InDesign, a computer text and image, lay-out based program used in graphic design.  This course is offered in an accelerated format.  InDesign II goes into the potential of the software at a greater depth.

ART 134 Photoshop Computer Software Workshop 1 credit

The focus of this course is an introductory course to the basics of Photoshop, a computer image-based program used in graphic design.  This course is offered in an accelerated format.

ART  238 Elements of Design 3 credits

The focus of this course in on an introduction to the visual and conceptual issues of graphic design with an emphasis on creative problem solving.  Exploration of design, visual communications, and graphic theory through applied problems will be addressed. Hands on use of painting, illustration and pagination software.

 ART 139, 239, 339 The Book as Art  3 credits each term

The focus of this course will be on the investigation into the process of bookmaking from simple zines to unique artist books.  We will learn several different structures and produce books with and without text.  Students will work individually and collectively to explore different ways of creating.  Ideas of narrative, found language, concrete poetry and illustration will be addressed

ART 200 Modern Art 1880-1945           3 credits

The focus of this course is the study of selected works of art and texts from the period. Primary source documents such as artists’ statements, manifestos and important works of criticism and poetry are studied alongside the painting, sculpture and performance that they address. Postimpressionism, symbolism, fauvism, expressionism, cubism, futurism and surrealism are some of the movements to be considered.

ART 208 Introduction to Art Therapy  3 credits

This course will present an introductory experience to the field of art therapy.  The course will include principles and practices of art therapy and the use of art making as a healing modality.  Students will be introduced to art therapy theory and practice, art therapy history and its pioneers as well as the present day art therapy community and the American Art Therapy Association.  Students will explore, through discussion and experiential work, the curative aspects of image and art making.

ART 209 Applications in Art Therapy 3 credits

This course offers a survey of applications in art therapy as related to media selection and methods in diverse settings and with a variety of populations.  Consideration of developmental issues, environmental factors, cultural diversity and adaptations for individual challenges will be explored. (Pre-requisite: ART 208 Introduction to Art Therapy)

ART 210 Contemporary Art 3 credits

The focus of this course is the study of selected artists and works from the period 1945-present. Emphasis is on work exhibited in the United States, regardless of the place of origin, and on theoretical and critical thought that accompanied the development of abstract expressionism, pop art, minimal art and other recent movements.

ART 220 Women Artists 3 credits

The focus of this course is a redefinition of well-established assumptions about the history of art and heightened awareness of the work of the many women artists who have participated in the history but whose work has been overlooked or undervalued. Students look closely at the historical circumstances that resulted in some women artists’ reputations, influence and work being virtually lost to subsequent generations. Questions are raised that challenge and explore the criteria used to determine what constitutes “great” art, including the varied points of view raised within feminist art criticism itself.

ART 260 Special Topics in Studio Art  3 credits

Media or form problems of special interest to students and faculty that are within the scope of existing facilities are studied in these courses.

ART 261 Special Topics in Art History 3 credits

ART 270  Art Therapy Practicum 3 credits

This course is designed to give senior students who have already completed the pre-requisite course, Introduction to Art Therapy and Applications in Art Therapy, an opportunity to clarify and focus their professional intentions and to obtain experience that will be useful in pursuing further educational opportunities. It is appropriate for students who plan to do graduate work in the field of art therapy. The central focus of the course is the practicum.  The student is expected to complete 80 hours of observation time in an approved facility during the 15 week semester, approximately 5-7 hours each week.  The observations must be performed under the supervision of a master’s level art therapist who will be available to supply feedback and discussion of art therapy concepts and approaches.

ART 272 Junior Art Seminar 3 credits

This course is designed to provide students with several opporturnities for art-making in new genres, in order to allow for a broad experience base as they move into their senior year.  The class focuses on collaboration and critical group discussion. 

ART 435 and 436 Advanced Problems 3 credits each term

This course is for advanced students working in different areas of concentration. Third and fourth level studios may be taken as Advanced Problems.  Fourth level (400 level) studios must be taken as Advanced Problems. Third level (300 level) studios may be taken as Advanced Problems with consent of the instructor. 

ART 390 Independent Study in  Art  

ART 470 Senior Studio Seminar   3 credits (fall only)

This course is offered every fall semester as a requirement for the art major. Students will focus on the creation of their own art work determined by their area of interest be it painting, sculpture, printmaking, ceramics, jewelry/metal smith.   Expectations of this course involve research, written work such as artist statements, resumes and other marketing material, and the creation of new works of art.  Through in-progress and group critiques the student will present their investigations and articulate their own interests and vision through visual work.

ART 472 Senior Art Exhibition 3 credits (spring only)

This course is the required for all students planning to exhibit their work in the senior art exhibition. The senior art exhibition is mandatory for art majors with a studio art focus, and optional (with permission from the portfolio review committee in the fall semester prior to this course) for those with an integrated art focus. ART 470 is a prerequisite. This course is to be taken Pass/Fail and must be taken with Advanced Problems.  The primary focus of this course is the preparation for the senior art exhibition.  Students will be involved in all aspects of preparing and installing an art exhibition, from critiquing and documenting their work, writing press releases, designing exhibition postcards, and the hanging of art work.  

 

BIOLOGY COURSES

BIO 111 Concepts in Ecology and Environmental Issues   4 credits

Contemporary environmental concerns on global, national and local levels are examined to increase awareness and scientific literacy and to promote stewardship in the understanding of their impact and application to human existence. In order to understand these environmental concerns it is important to study the nature of our environment, biodiversity, biogeochemical  cycles, populations, and our renewable and non-renewable  resources. The laboratory is an integral part of the course  and will reinforce lecture material. (Not accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major.)

BIO 112 Concepts in Human Biology and Health Issues 4 credits

The application of biological principles to contemporary health issues are examined in this course to provide awareness and scientific literacy about their potential impact and importance to our well-being and the choices we make. Students will gain an appreciation of the design of the human body through a study of its organization, the  interrelationships among the many organ systems, patterns of chromosome and genetic inheritance and cancer. (Not  accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major.)

BIO 117 Human Anatomy and Physiology I 4 credits

A study of the unity of structure and function with clinical  applications, this course will provide the foundation for  understanding the design of the human body from the  cell to the system level under the unifying theme of  homeostasis.  Topics include anatomical terminology,  chemistry, cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal,  muscular, nervous and sensory systems. The laboratory component will focus on anatomical  principles and complement lecture through microscopic  and macroscopic observations. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. (Not accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major.)

BIO 118 Human Anatomy and Physiology II 4 credits

A continuation of the study of structure and function  with clinical applications important to understanding the human body under the unifying theme of homeostasis, this  course will continue using physiological principles to study  the endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive,  urinary, reproductive systems, metabolism and development. The laboratory component will focus on anatomical  principles and complement lecture with microscopic  and macroscopic observations enhanced with dissections.  Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. (Not accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major). Prerequisite: BIO117 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 121 Principles of Biology I 4 credits

An introduction to the basic, unifying principles of biological systems, this course emphasizes the building blocks of life, cellular metabolism and processes, patterns of inheritance and human genetics and molecular mechanisms of heredity and gene function. The laboratory consists of investigative research and emphasizes skills and techniques. This course is designed for science majors, allied health and pre-professional students. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. BIO121 and 122 may be taken in either order.

BIO 122 Principles of Biology II 4 credits

An introduction to evolutionary theory and principles, this course emphasizes plant diversity, structure and function, animal diversity, vertebrate animal structure and function, human structure and function, and an overview of ecology and animal behavior. The laboratory includes student/faculty research and emphasizes skills and techniques. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. BIO121 and 122 may be taken in either order.

BIO 127 Clinical Microbiology 4 credits

The general characteristics of bacteria, protozoa, yeasts, molds and viruses are used to understand the role of microorganisms in human health and disease. The interactions between the host and the microorganisms are emphasized as well as the physical and chemical methods of control.  Infectious disease agents are covered by body  system.  Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: college-level chemistry course appropriate  for intended major. (Not accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major.)

BIO/NEU 200 Introduction to Neuroscience 3 credits

This introductory course covers many aspects of  neuroscience including synaptic transmission,  psychopharmacology, sensory systems, cognition, learning  and basis of neurological disease. Prerequisites: BIO 121,  122 or PSY 100, or permission of the instructor.

BIO 201 Research Directorship 1 credit

Research Directors (RD’s) lead a team of 3-6 Principles of Biology II lab students through the many steps of scientific research. Developing a research plan and schedule, teaching laboratory and/or field techniques,  critiquing oral presentations and a written abstract are the primary responsibilities of an RD. Prerequisite: BIO 122 and permission of the instructor.

BIO 207 Botany (Alternate years) 4 credits

A study of plants from the green algae through the angiosperms. Plant structure, function, physiology, ecology, and conservation will be addressed. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the evolutionary relationships among different plant families and the learning of key characteristics to aid in plant identification. The lecture and laboratory sections of the course must be taken together. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: BIO111 or BIO122 or permission of the instructor.

BIO/HON 214 Bioterrorism & Emerging Infectious Diseases 3 credits

Ebola, anthrax, Lyme disease, SARS, polio, smallpox, the Plague, mad cow disease and the avian flu continue to attract the attention of the human species. These are either emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) or the agents responsible for the diseases that plague our kind. In some cases, EIDs and bioterrorism go hand in hand. This course will cover the biological mechanisms of a diversity of diseases, the ecology of disease agents and vectors, the impact of globalization on the spread of EIDs, agencies (e.g., CDC) involved in fighting the spread of diseases, bioterrorism in the past, present and future, and the socioeconomic impact of EIDs and bioterrorism. Lectures, debates, book discussions, films, and projects will be integral parts of this course. Prerequisite: An enthusiastic interest in learning more about bioterrorism and emerging infectious diseases.

BIO 217 Anatomy and Physiology I 4 credits

A comprehensive course integrating the structure and function of the human body with a problem- based approach, this course is a study of the organizational design of the body, homeostasis, the chemical basis of life, the structure and function of the cell, systemic histology and systemic physiology with an emphasis on the integumentary,  skeletal, muscular, nervous and sensory systems. Dissections, including cat dissections, are an integral part of the laboratory experience. The laboratory  component complements lecture through its focus on analysis and anatomy through both microscopic and macroscopic observations  to understand the complexity of the human body.  Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: BIO122 or permission of instructor.

BIO 218 Anatomy and Physiology II 4 credits

A continuation of the comprehensive, problem-based approach to the study of structure, function and homeostasis  in the human body, this course involves a study of  the endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Studies also include metabolism, nutrition, fluid and electrolyte balance, and growth and development. Dissections, including cat  dissections, are an integral part of the laboratory experience.  The laboratory component complements lecture through a  continued microscopic and macroscopic analysis and comparison of organ systems.  Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.  Prerequisite: BIO 217 or permission of instructor.

BIO/NEU/PSY 220 Sensation and Perception (Alternate years) 3 or 4 credits

An in-depth study of sensory systems including vision,  taste, olfaction, audition and somatic senses. Lab is  required for Neuroscience majors. This course fulfills  only the 3 credit SCI requirement. Prerequisite: PSY 100  or BIO 121.

BIO 224 Animal Behavior: An Evolutionary Approach (Alternate years) 3 credits

A study of the underlying (proximate) mechanisms an evolutionary (ultimate) causes of animal behavior. Topics will include how genes and the environment affect the development of behavior, the neurological control of behavior, and the evolution of behavioral adaptations (habitat selection, territoriality, migration, communication, predator avoidance, foraging strategies, reproductive strategies, and social behavior). The evolution of human behavior will also be discussed. Concepts will be introduced and discussed using a hypothetico-deductive approach. Prerequisites: BIO 111 or BIO122 or PSY 100.

BIO 227 Microbiology 4 credits

A survey of microbial life including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses (with an emphasis on bacteria). Topics covered include microbial characteristics, physical and chemical control, metabolism, enzymes, regulation of enzyme activity, bacterial genetics, bacterial diversity, host-microbe interactions, and applications of microbiology. The laboratory includes aseptic technique, staining procedures, culture methods, cultural and physical characteristics, microbial control, microbiology of food, water, and soil, microbiology of the body, and identification of unknowns. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122, 236, CHE 111, 112.

BIO 235 Ecology, Evolution, and Genetics 4 credits

This course covers material beyond the introductory level in the areas of ecology, evolution, and classical genetics. Topics include population, community, and ecosystem ecology; extensions of Mendelian genetics; microevolution and evolutionary genetics; speciation; and macroevolution. The associated lab includes a field component, Lecture, three hours, laboratory, three hours. Prerequisites (lecture and lab, C- or better): BIO121 and 122 required, CHE 111 and 112 recommended.

BIO 236 Cell and Molecular Biology 4 credits

This course expands on fundamental concepts in the areas of cell and molecular biology with special emphasis on the molecular reactions and cellular structures found inside of eukaryotic cells. Topics will include microscopy; cell structure and function; cell cycle and reproduction; gene expression and its control; molecular mechanisms of inheritance, inter- and intracellular signaling and interactions. In conjunction with the lecture course, the laboratory sections will provide the students with firsthand experience in commonly used experimental techniques in cell and molecular biology. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites (lecture and lab, C- or better): BIO121 and 122 required, CHE 111 and 112 recommended.

BIO 243 Biology Independent Research 1-2 credits

This course is designed for students who are interested in conducting independent research under the guidance of a faculty member from the Department of Biological Sciences, but have not developed a research proposal for their independent project. This course may be repeated; 2 credits per semester is the standard load. This course may not be applied to the Thesis Option for any major. Prerequisites: permission of the faculty supervising the research.

BIO 248 Biostatistics 3 credits

An introduction to parametric and nonparametric statistical methods commonly used to analyze biological data, students learn and apply these methods to their own research and/or to ecological, molecular and health related data found in the primary literature. Prerequisite: BIO121, 122; junior or senior standing recommended.

BIO 300 Evolution (Alternate years) 3 or 4 credits

This course involves in-depth study of mechanisms of evolution and how they relate to the complexity of the world and its organisms. Evolutionary change will be studied as it occurs at the genetic level, within populations, between species, and as it relates to physical changes in the environment. The use of fossil, morphological, and molecular data to tease apart evolutionary relationships among taxa will be discussed and examined further in the lab. Students may take only the lecture portion of the course (3 credits) or the lecture and laboratory portion of the course (4 credits). Prerequisites: BIO235, 236.

BIO 304 Pathophysiology (Alternate years) 3 credits

A study of the underlying changes in human physiology at the tissue and organ level that result from disease and injury. Prerequisite: Bio 117 and 118 or 217 and 218 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 307 Biodiversity and Conservation Biology 4 credits

An overview of the science of conservation covering 1) the nature of conservation biology and the definition, origin, and global patterns of biodiversity, 2) the threats to biodiversity including habitat destruction and fragmentation, exotic species introductions, overexploitation, and disease, 3) how these threats affect the genetics and demographic processes of small populations, and 4) an introduction to the methods used to stop the loss of biodiversity including establishing new populations, ex situ conservation strategies, the design, establishment, and management of protected areas, and restoration ecology. Prerequisite: BIO 235 or permission of instructor.

BIO 312 GIS and Spatial Modeling (Alternate years) 4 credits

Students in this course will gain both field and lab experience in the uses of GPS (Geographical Positioning Systems) and GIS (Geographic Information System).The relationship of these new technologies to the fields of conservation biology, land management, business, criminal investigation, and city planning will be discussed through readings in the primary literature and experienced through class projects. Projects include mapping and data basing the Cedar Crest College Buildings and Arboretum, assessing habitat use by animals in a local park, and a study of changes in land use over time. Students must take both the lecture and lab portions of this course. Prerequisites: BIO121, 122; BIO 235 is strongly recommended.

BIO 313 Advanced Mendelian and Population Genetics 3 credits

This course deals with advanced concepts in the inheritance of genes and traits. Extensions of Mendelian genetics include  gene interaction, recombination, and quantitative genetics. Topics  in population genetics include Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and its  extensions, Wright-Fisher populations, the coalescent, linkage disequilibrium, and molecular population genetics.  The course emphasizes theory and applications, the latter including conservation, biomedical, and  forensic genetics. Prerequisite: BIO 236.

BIO 315 Case Studies in Conservation Biology 2-3 Credits

This course will be taught in a seminar style and involve a review and discussion of readings, issues and examples in biodiversity and conservation biology. Students will work independently and in small groups to critique Federally endangered species recovery plans, create materials that would be informative to the public regarding conservation issues, and debate the design of a park/preserve. Students taking the course for 3, rather than 2 credits, will also participate in service-learning projects involving environmental issues in the local community. Prerequisites: BIO121, 122, and 235; BIO307 is strongly recommended (can be taken concurrently).

BIO/PHI 320 Biomedical Ethics (Alternate years) 3 credits

Offers an investigation of ethical issues, using philosophical models and biomedical case studies, in areas of death and dying, human experimentation, reproductive manipulation, genetic engineering, behavioral control and health-care delivery. Prerequisite: Junior standing. BIO 323 Bioinformatics (Alternate years) 4 credits This course is a study of central concepts in bioinformatics. Topics will include DNA and protein sequence alignment, database searches and phylogenetic reconstruction; genomics and related disciplines; and perl programming. Emphasis will be placed on the current primary literature. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: BIO 235 and BIO 236, or permission of the instructor.

BIO 323 Bioinformatics (Alternate years) 4 credits

This course is a study of central concepts in bioinformatics. Topics will include DNA and protein sequence alignment, database searches and phylogenetic reconstruction; genomics and related disciplines; and perl programming. Emphasis will be placed on the current primary literature. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: BIO 235, 236, or permission of the instructor

BIO 327 Microbial Pathogenesis and Human Immunology (Alternate years) 3 or 4 credits

This course will introduce the microorganisms responsible for many common diseases and the ways in which the human body can protect itself against these disease agents. Topics include immunology, bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology, and microbial pathogenesis. Lectures, case studies, current events, literature research, and projects will be integral parts of this course. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Students may take only the lecture portion of the course (3 credits) or the lecture and lab (4 credits). Prerequisites: BIO227, or permission of the instructor.

BIO 328 Marine Ecology and Conservation (Alternate years) 3 or 4 credits

This course is an introduction to the organisms, habitats, and ecosystems that make up the marine realm and the conservation issues that affect them. Special emphasis is given to neotropical marine ecosystems. Topics include physical oceanography, marine biodiversity, the ecology of marine organisms and communities, and marine conservation ecology. The optional field experience is taught at a marine station in the Caribbean. While at the field site, students will: (1) learn basic research methods that are utilized during marine field studies, (2) conduct a comparative biodiversity study of neo-tropical ecosystems, including coral reefs, sea grass beds, and mangroves, (3) conduct marine conservation research projects, and (4) be introduced to the culture of Belize. Snorkeling is required. Students are responsible for all travel and lodging expenses. While this is a Fall semester course, the field portion will be held in early January. Lecture: 3 cr.; Field experience: 1cr. Prerequisites: BIO235.

BIO/NEU 330 Neuropharmacology (Alternate years) 3 credits

An in-depth study of the pharmacological aspects of  neuroscience with an emphasis on clinical applications.  Prerequisite: NEU 200.

BIO 332 Developmental Biology (Alternate years) 3 or 4 credits

From the DNA blueprint to an organism’s final structure, this course is a morphological and molecular study of growth and differentiation. Lecture may be taken without the laboratory. Prerequisites: BIO235 and 236.

BIO 335 Molecular Genetics I 4 credits

Part one of a two-part course in molecular genetics, this semester emphasizes molecular mechanisms as they apply to prokaryotic organisms. Lectures will begin with a general review of genetics and cell biology, cover basic techniques used in molecular biology research, and then detail the processes of DNA replication and transcription in prokaryotes. In the laboratory portion of this course, students will use restriction endonucleases to clone specific genes from bacterial DNA. They will demonstrate their success through restriction mapping, gene-specific PCR, and gene expression. Prerequisites: BIO235, 236.

BIO 336 Molecular Genetics II 4 credits

Part two of a two-part course in molecular genetics, this semester emphasizes molecular mechanisms as they apply to eukaryotic organisms. Lectures explore basic techniques used in molecular biology research as the processes of transcription and translation in eukaryotes are examined. The impact that current research in the field of molecular genetics has on society health issues and world politics is also examined. In the laboratory portion of this course, students will construct a cDNA library which they will probe using primers that they designed. Prerequisite: BIO335.

BIO/NEU 340 Neuroscience Methods (Alternate years) 4 credits

This laboratory course introduces students to several of  the methods currently used by neuroscientists including  electrophysiological, histological and molecular  techniques. The lecture component explores both  classical and current literature in Neuroscience.  Prerequisites: BIO 236, NEU 200 (NEU 200 can  be taken concurrently).

BIO 342 Radiation Biology 4 credits

A study of the properties of radiation, its detection and measurement and its pathological and therapeutic effect upon the living system. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.

BIO 343 Polymerase Chain Reaction - PCR (Alternate years) 1.5 credits

A 7-week laboratory-intensive course on polymerase chain reaction (PCR), one of the most important tools of molecular biology. Prerequisites: BIO 236 and junior or senior standing.

BIO 344 DNA Sequencing (Alternate years) 1.5 credits

This lab-intensive course will help students to better understand both the Sanger and Maxam-Gilbert Methods of sequencing. Students will experience Sanger sequencing through both manual and automated sequencing methods. They will also learn how to interpret data as they use biotechnology to identify sequences and build basic sequence comparisons. Prerequisites: BIO236 and junior or senior status.

BIO 345 Advanced Recombinant DNA Techniques 3 credits

An introduction to advanced recombinant DNA techniques with an emphasis on theory and applications. Prerequisites: BIO335, 336.

BIO 346 Antibody Production and Characterization 4 credits

An introduction to antibody production and immunoassays. Basic aspects of immunology are discussed along with polyclonal, monoclonal and recombinant antibodies. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: BIO 227; CHE 205, 206.

BIO 347 Microscopy and Image Analysis 1.5 credits

Theory and application of advanced techniques in microcopy, including fluorescence and laser scanning confocal  microscopy. Introduction to digital image processing and analysis. This 7-week laboratory-intensive course meets for the second half of the Spring semester.

BIO/NEU 348 Diseases of the Nervous System (Alternate years) 3 or 4 credits

Our brains control everything that makes us human,  including how we think, feel, learn, and how we perceive  the outside world.  When the brain is damaged by disease or injury or fails to form correctly during development,  the results can be catastrophic. This course will examine  selected diseases of the nervous system at both the clinical and the molecular level and assess current treatments.   Diseases to be discussed may include Alzheimer,  schizophrenia, neural tube defects, autism, and spinal  cord injuries. Readings from the primary literature  and laboratory activities will complement the lecture material.  Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Lecture may be  taken without the laboratory.  Prerequisites: BIO 235, 236.

BIO 349 Protein Purification and Analysis (Alternate years) 1.5 credits

A 7-week, laboratory-intensive course covering the methodologies of protein purification such as column chromatography and ammonium sulfate precipitation, quantification of protein concentration through colorimetric methods, and protein analysis through both denaturing and non-denaturing PAGE. Various methods of detection are used including coomassie blue stain, an enzymatic assay, and western blot. Prerequisites: BIO236 and junior or senior status.

BIO 350 Junior Colloquium 2 credits

This course fulfills two goals: (1) development of career plans and skills, including interviews, resumes, and oral, written, and computer communication. (2) development of critical thinking skills through the selection of a research topic and preparation of a research proposal. Should a student select the thesis option for her major, this proposal will be the foundation for her thesis research. This course is part of the capstone requirement for all majors in the Department of Biological Sciences, and is normally taken in the fall of the junior year. Prerequisite: BIO121, 122 and Junior standing.

BIO 353 Biology Independent Research

1-2 credits

This course is designed for students who wish to complete the Thesis Option for their major by conducting independent research under the guidance of a faculty member from the Department of Biological Sciences. Students who choose to conduct thesis research should have developed a proposal that outlines their research plan prior to registering for this course. This course may be repeated; 2 credits per semester is the standard load. The Thesis Option requires a minimum of 4 credits earned by working in a coherent research project. Prerequisites: permission of the faculty supervising the research and successful completion of BIO350.

BIO 354 Thesis and Presentation 1 credit

This course serves as the capstone course for the Thesis Option for all majors in the Department of Biological Sciences. Completion of this course requires (1) submission of a written thesis to the faculty supervising the student’s thesis research and (2) oral or poster presentation of the student’s research project to the college community at the Biological Sciences Research Symposium. Prerequisites: Declared major within the Department of Biological Sciences; permission of the faculty supervising the research; 4 credits of BIO 353, CHE 391/392 (2 credits of BIO 353 - CHE391/392 may be taken concurrently).

BIO 355 Science, Ethics and Society 2 credits

This course provides science majors with an opportunity to form connections between their scientific background and society as a whole. Students will gain an understanding of the role of science in society and the importance of ethics within science. This course is part of the capstone requirement for all majors in the Department of Biological Sciences and is normally taken in the fall of the senior year.  Prerequisite: BIO350.

BIO 360 Special Topics in Biology

1-4 credits

A consideration of a selected topic in contemporary or classical biology. Permission of the instructor is required. BIO 390 Independent Study 1-4 credits Prerequisite: Permission of faculty.

Biology Courses Offered in Affiliation with Hawk Mountain Sanctuary

All Hawk Mountain courses are held regardless of weather conditions and require outdoor fieldwork and hiking on rugged terrain. Appropriate clothing and footgear are recommended. Students must provide their own transportation to the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary in Kempton, PA. All classes, including the first class, for Hawk Mountain courses are held at the Acopian Center for Conservation Learning (ACCL) at Hawk Mountain. The only exception is the first class for BIO 111 Concepts in Ecology and Environment at Hawk Mountain (summer course). This class is held at Cedar Crest College. The rest of the BIO 111 classes are then held at the ACCL.

The raptor biology courses (253, 256, 259) are recommended as a sequence for Biology majors desiring to earn a 3-credit elective. Any of the Hawk Mountain courses can be combined to fulfill 3- or 4- credit elective biology major requirements, providing the student has completed a full year of introductory biology. These courses may also be used with a 3-credit biology elective to fulfill a 4-credit elective for Biology majors. Students without the full year of introductory biology prerequisite may take the courses but not for credit toward their major. There is a $35 site fee charged for 1-credit courses; $50 for 2-credit courses; $75 for 3 or 4 credit courses.

BIO 251 Neotropical Migrant Birds 1 credit

A focus on neotropical migrant birds with consideration of their natural history, identification and migratory patterns. Students learn orientation and theory in the classroom. Location, identification and discussion of species are studied in the field (Hawk Mountain Sanctuary and surrounding area). The course meets one weekend in late April or early May.

BIO 252 Field Ornithology 3 credits

A field course oriented to identification, adaptations, habitat associations and sociobiology of birds at Hawk Mountain. The course meets for two weekends (one in September and October).

BIO 253 Dynamics of Raptor Migration 1 credit

An introduction to hawk migration, including the effects of weather and geography, hawk identification, migration research and a small independent project. The course meets for two Saturdays in the fall.

BIO 256 Birds of Prey in Winter: A Study in Adaptation (Alternate years) 1 credit

An introduction to the winter ecology of Pennsylvania’s hawks, eagles and falcons, with emphasis on hunting strategies and tactics, prey selection, competition for food and aggressive interactions. The course meets for one weekend in late January.

BIO 259 Nesting Birds of Prey (Alternate years) 1 credit

An introduction to the breeding ecology of Pennsylvania’s hawks, eagles, falcons and owls, with emphasis on territorial behavior, parent-offspring interactions, nestling growth and development and conservation ecology. The course meets for one weekend in March.

 

BUSINESS COURSES

BUA 110 Principles of Management    3 credits

An introduction to the functions and responsibilities of business management. This course examines the fundamentals of management and explores why management is needed in today’s complex business world. It explores the traditional functions of planning, controlling and organizing and pays special attention to organizational structures, leadership, and motivation. An excellent course for both business and non-business majors, it requires no prerequisites.

BUA 211 Introduction to Healthcare Systems 3 credits

An in-depth overview and analysis of American health care and medical delivery systems.  Cultural, political, economic and environmental factors that affect health care delivery will be explored from historic and contemporary perspectives.  Specific forces influencing health care delivery including reimbursement, labor shortages, the impact of health maintenance organizations, aging population and access to healthcare will be discussed.  Emphasis is placed on the way healthcare is reimbursed in the U.S. and the history of for-profit, not-for-profit and entitlement programs.  A look at structure, access, organization and functions will provide the student with an introduction to the complexity and unique elements of health care systems.  Co-requisite:  BUA 110.  

BUA 216 Personal Finance 3 credits

Designed to acquaint the student with the concepts of portfolio analysis in the general area of investment management. The course discusses principles for managing financial assets. Many of these principles apply to both personal and institutional investment strategies. In addition to an introduction to the major investment vehicles available in developed nations, students will learn how to establish appropriate investment objectives, develop optimal portfolio strategies, estimate risk-return tradeoffs, and evaluate investment performance.

BUA 220 Human Resource Management 3 credits

A course in Human Resource Management, specific attention is placed on the day-to-day administrative and management procedures necessary to support the workforce. Included are matters of recruiting, selecting and hiring personnel, compensation and benefits, legal requirements that govern records and interactions with employees, rules and regulations covering termination, task definition, and training. Prerequisites:  BUA 110 or permission of the instructor.

BUA 221 Business Law 3 credits

Business relationships are largely based upon contractual agreements. This course provides an introduction to the legal system as it effects business, the nature and meaning of law, sources of law, legal process and institutions. Students examine the legal environment of business, along with the individual’s rights and responsibilities in a free society. Particular emphasis is placed on contracts, at common law and under the Uniform Commercial Code, and the exploration of how these principles apply to modern life both in and out of the business setting.

BUA 239 Employment Law 3 credits

Managing within the law requires students to understand the interrelationships between the various federal and state laws and regulations affecting employment relationships and management’s human resource policies and practices. This course provides students with the foundations necessary to foster a healthy, productive and lawful work environment.  Experiential exercises reinforce an understanding of the application of law to employment situations and advocacy issues in employment discrimination cases.  Prerequisites:  BUA 221 or BUA 110.

BUA 240 International Business          3 credits

A course in international business that examines the global business structure with a focus on cultural differences, the theories of international trade and investment, the functions of foreign exchange and monetary systems, and the process of strategic and operational decisions. Students are asked to broaden their perspective on obtaining news and information to assess international issues intelligently. Prerequisites:  ECO 101, BUA 110, MRK 230.

BUA 250 Principles of Finance 3 credits

An examination of the modern theories that explain financial decision-making. This course considers decisions made by managers to obtain, manage, and invest funds for the operation of the organization. Topics include the time value of money, financial markets and institutions, financial instruments, financial planning, ratio analysis, working capital management and capital budgeting. Prerequisites: ACC 102, ECO 102, MAT 105.

BUA 258 Healthcare Management       3 credits

An in-depth look at healthcare delivery systems with emphasis on administrative functions, terminology, accreditation, human resources management, medical staff relationships and the many legal aspects of health care management.  Special emphasis is given to the topics of the uninsured population, access to care, world health, financing health care in other countries, quality improvement, marketing and corporate compliance.  Prerequisites: BUA 211.

BUA 281 Business Ethics 4 credits

An examination of how ethical and moral considerations interact with the role of business and its search for legitimacy within our society. Business must identify various organization stakeholders, recognize the conflicting demands that emanate from each, and develop management behaviors, policies and practices that are acceptable to as many as possible. Students engage in understanding the societal, organizational, and institutional pressures on businesses and their employees when making decisions. Changing ethical and moral standards as businesses transcend political and cultural boundaries in the global marketplace merit attention. Real-life and hypothetical case study situations are used to enhance the classroom experience. Prerequisites: BUA 110 or SOC 100 or PHI 100 or PSC 201.

BUA 300 Writing for Management         3 credits

A focus on the close connection between all levels of management communication and the written document. Special emphasis is placed on the creation and development of all forms of written management communications, including email, memos, reports and proposals, and close attention is paid to the amenities of good English syntax as it impacts effective communication. Includes oral and written presentations of management information. Prerequisite: WRI 100 or HON 122, BUA 110, Sophomore standing.

BUA 320 Attracting, Selecting and Retaining Talent 3 credits

Any organization’s most important asset is the people.  This course presents theory, research and application on the recruitment, selection and retention of individuals in the workplace. This course is organized into three parts: a) recruitment processes from the organizational and applicant perspective; b) the logistics and legal issues of employee selection; and c) various issues related to the retention of productive and satisfied workers. Case studies are used to demonstrate concepts.  Prerequisite: BUA 220.

BUA 325 Compensation Management 3 credits

The study of establishing pay and employee benefit programs that are consistent with organizational objectives and focus employee efforts to organizational goals. Students also explore the design of rewards and incentive programs that impact job satisfaction and retention. This applied examination of financial reward systems is in the context of relevant theoretical and legal perspectives. Topics include compensation structures, job evaluation, pay surveys, incentives, pay equity, benefits, executive compensation and compensation strategy. Prerequisite: BUA 220.

BUA 328 Power, Influence, and Negotiation 3 credits

An examination of how influence, power and organizational politics are related to effective negotiation and development of leadership style.  Experiential exercises facilitate learned application of strategy. This course is intended for those who want to challenge themselves to explore their potential to stimulate innovation and creativity in others.  Prerequisites: BUA 110 or PSY 100 or CRJ 101.  

BUA 329 Organizational Behavior       3 credits

A study of the relationship between enlightened, effective management and individual, group and organizational performance. Particular focus is directed to organizational climate, intergroup behavior, reward processes, performance evaluation, leadership and communications. Prerequisite: BUA 110 and Junior standing.

BUA 335 Retail Management 3 credits

Students will examine the retail business process and understand the components of developing and maintaining a retail operation. The course includes the fundamentals needed to analyze the daily business practices of a retail establishment and apply solutions based on sound management theory and practical experience.  Prerequisite: MRK 230.

BUA 340 Healthcare Finance 3 credits

Introduces the student to current performance measurement, budgeting and reimbursement processes in health care facilities.  Topics include financial statements, the prospective payment system, managed care, utilization management and other sources of health care revenue and cost management.  The course discusses cost/benefit analysis, capital financing, risk management and performance indicators pertinent to the health care industry.  Prerequisite: BUA 258.

BUA 345 Operations and Supply Chain Management 3 credits

A survey course of the analysis, decisions, and actions necessary to operate efficient and effective organizations.  Considered are topics in forecasting, capacity planning, scheduling, dispatching, projects, process design, facility design, and quality control.  Students are asked to integrate the functions of marketing, finance, and organizational behavior to understand how products or services move from conception to delivery.  Prerequisites:  BUA 250, BUA 329 or PSY 301, MRK 230.

BUA 350 Leadership 3 credits

Encouraging and achieving change in organizations and communities is the focus of this course. On a foundation of theoretical and applied concepts in leadership, students will undertake projects that develop the ability to create authentic visions and sustainable, cooperative responses to issues and opportunities.  Simultaneously, students are asked to confront the challenge of moral leadership through an assessment of examples where individuals must make choices with significant ethical implications. Prerequisite:  BUA 110 or PSY 100.

BUA 351 Applied Strategic Management I 3 credits

This course is the first of two required courses that consider the development and the execution of business strategy.  Starting from the premise that business strategy is a holistic process that combines all business functions, as well as the internal and external environment of an organization, students will learn the process of strategy, its underlying theory, and the key decisions that must be made to integrate an organization’s capabilities and gain competitive advantage.  Students will use representative case studies to analyze, discuss, and recommend strategic behavior.  The course prepares students for Applied Strategic Management II, which requires the development and defense of a formal business plan.  Prerequisites:  BUA 345, ECO 101, MAT 110.

BUA 352 Applied Strategic Management II 3 credits

This capstone course for business and accounting majors integrates the collective knowledge students have acquired from the various functional areas of business to include accounting, finance, management, marketing, human resources, business ethics, and law.  Specific emphasis is on entrepreneurship and teamwork.  Students are organized into management teams for the purpose of analyzing a business from a strategic perspective and developing a business plan.  Each team will be assigned a real company to work with and be assigned a Board of Directors consisting of a Cedar Crest Professor, one or two outside business professionals and a member of the client business’s management team (when appropriate).  Each team will meet with their Board three times during the semester.  The Board will act as advisors and mentors to the teams, and participate in their evaluation.

Business topics of strategic management and current business events will also be discussed throughout the semester.  The students will gain a practical experience in business that encompasses a wide variety of business issues while learning directly from the regions best business people.  The client companies get new and fresh insights into their organization from some of the brightest young minds in the area, under supervision of the some of the region’s most respected professionals.  Prerequisite:  BUA 351.

BUA 160, 260, or 360 Special Topics 1-3 credits

This course is an exploration of specialized topics not among the traditional course offerings. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change.

 

CHEMISTRY COURSES

CHE 103 Concepts in Chemistry 5 credits

A study of descriptive chemistry as it relates to allied health fields. Fundamentals of reactions in solution, acid-base theory, and gas laws are presented in relation to physiological systems. This course also covers basic organic chemistry and biochemistry from organic structure and functional groups to carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes. Four hours integrated lecture and recitation and 2.5 hours laboratory per week. Prerequisites: Basic Arithmetic and Algebra Skills.

CHE 111 Chemical Principles 4 credits

A detailed study of principles and methods in theoretical and descriptive chemistry. Stoichiometry, periodic behavior, gases, solutions, and simple equilibria are covered. Laboratory emphasis is on basic chemical principles and qualitative analysis. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: High school chemistry.

CHE 112 Chemical Equilibrium and Analysis 4 credits

A study of the analytical chemistry of the more common elements. Acid-base theory, solubility, and redox equilibria are treated in lecture and applied in lab. Statistical evaluation of volumetric, optical, and potentiometric data are also covered. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: completion of CHE 111 lecture with a grade of C- or better, and completion of CHE 111 laboratory with a grade of D or better.

CHE 203 Survey of Organic Chemistry 3 or 4 credits

An overview of the chemistry of carbon compounds: naming, structure, functional groups, and reactions, with continual reference to substances of biological activity and importance. Topics discussed build from basic hydrocarbons and concepts to polyfunctional and complex systems. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. The 3-credit option does not include laboratory. Prerequisite: One year of college chemistry.

CHE 205 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits

A study of the chemistry of carbon compounds: structure, naming, reactions and synthesis involving major functional groups. Laboratory emphasis is on synthesis, separations and purification of organic compounds. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: One year of college chemistry.

CHE 206 Organic Chemistry II 4 credits

A continuation of CHE 205 with focus on aromatic compounds and oxygenated functional groups. The laboratory stresses compound identifications through wet chemical and various spectral methods. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CHE 205 or its equivalent

CHE 230 Analytical Chemistry 4 credits

A study of the fundamentals of analytical chemistry.  An emphasis is placed on statistics, solubility equilibria, acid-base equilibria, electrochemistry, and chromatography,  The essential skills of quantitative analysis will be emphasized in the laboratory. Prerequisite: CHE 112

CHE 241 Crime Scene Pattern Analysis 4 credits

Students will be introduced to basic concepts in criminalistics, such as identification and individualization. Among the topics for lecture and laboratory instruction are photography and other methods of crime scene documentation, imprint and impression recovery and analysis, firearms identification, and questioned document examination. Students are introduced to physical patterns such as blood spatter, bullet trajectory, and glass fracture typically found at crime scenes. Emphasis is also placed on the proper handling, packaging, and transport of physical evidence from crime scenes. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: CHE 111.

CHE 300  Technical Information 3 credits

An introduction to the chemical literature and methods for literature searching using hardcopy and computer-assisted techniques. Major reference works, domestic and foreign research and review journals, and patents are discussed. Students gain experience in searching the literature, abstracting information in written form, and writing research papers for publication. Prerequisite: CHE 205 and 206.

CHE 302  Instrumental Analysis 4 credits

A study of the principles, applications, and theories of modern instrumental analysis methods, including signal/noise ratios, and the fundamentals of spectroscopy and chromatography. The components of a wide variety of instruments are examined in detail. Laboratory provides hands-on experience with modern analytical instrumentation, including gas and liquid chromatography, absorption and fluorescence, mass spectrometry, atomic absorption, Fourier transform infrared, and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Prerequisites: CHE 206 and PHY 102, or departmental approval.

CHE 306  Advanced Organic Chemistry 3 credits

A continuation of organic chemistry with emphasis on synthetic methods, condensations and cycloadditions, organometallic reagents, aliphatic and aromatic substitutions, and reaction site selectivity. Also, molecular rearrangements and multi-step synthesis pathways. Frequent reference to the current chemical literature. Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry.

CHE 307 Biochemistry I 3 or 4 credits

A study of the structure, properties and functions of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids. Enzyme kinetics is introduced and selected enzyme mechanisms are discussed. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. The 3-credit option does not include laboratory. Prerequisite: one year of organic chemistry.

CHE 308 Biochemistry II 3 or 4 credits

Metabolic pathways are surveyed in terms of bioenergetics, mechanisms of selected enzyme mediated processes, and key metabolic controls. The molecular and clinical aspects of various diseases are discussed. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. The 3-credit option does not include laboratory. Prerequisite: CHE 307 or departmental approval.

CHE 314 Toxicology 3 credits

Toxicology will present an overview of toxicology principles including absorption, distribution, metabolism, and elimination of toxicants. The effects of toxicants on biological systems and their mechanism of action will be discussed. Toxic effects of specific organic and inorganic materials will be presented. In addition, methods of measuring toxicity will be discussed. Prerequisite: CHE 205 or its equivalent.

CHE 320 Environmental Chemistry 4 credits

Chemical reactions of environmental importance are studied, particularly those of global scope. Specific topics include ozone depletion, global warming, air pollution, alternative energy generation, nuclear power, and pesticides. Discussion includes analysis of human attempts to ameliorate environmental damage by technological and political means. Laboratory includes both quantitative analytical methods and computer modeling. The 3-credit option does not include laboratory. Prerequisite: Chemistry 205.

CHE 331 Inorganic Chemistry 3 credits

The primary focus of the course is the application of group theoretical methods to chemical systems, particularly transition metal complexes. Modern bonding theories such as Lewis-Langmuir, Valence Bond, VSEPR, and molecular orbital theory are studied, and their predictions are compared to those from group theory. Important experimental results, including the spectrochemical series, are explained in light of the modern bonding theories. The laboratory consists of the synthesis of representative inorganic compounds. 3 credit option does not include laboratory. Prerequisite: CHE 205, CHE 206, MAT 141, and MAT 142 (which may be concurrent).

CHE 335 Physical Chemistry I 4 credits

A study of the laws of thermodynamics and their application to solutions and phase equilibria, and chemical kinetics. Laboratory emphasis on applications of thermodynamic and kinetic principles and writing laboratory reports in journal format. Prerequisite: MAT 141, MAT 142 and PHY 101 (which may be concurrent). Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.

CHE 336 Physical Chemistry II 3 credits

The focus of the course is the study of quantum mechanics and its application to atomic and molecular structure. Method for the exact solution of the Schroedinger equation are mastered. Approximation methods such as the variational method are introduced. General Valence Bond (GVB) and molecular orbital (M.O.) theories are investigated. Prerequisite: MAT 141, 142, PHY 101. Note that CHE 335 is not a prerequisite.

CHE 341 Polymer Chemistry 3 credits

A survey of the reactions leading to macromolecules: step and chain processes; kinetics, mechanisms and catalysts; the relation of reaction composition and molecular structure to polymer properties. Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry.

CHE 344 Heterocyclic Compounds 3 credits

A study of the chemistry of nonbenzenoid aromatics containing ring hetero atoms, ranging from simple heterocycles to polycyclic systems and the nucleic acid bases. Emphasis is placed on synthesis, reactions and compounds of natural origin and pharmaceutical interest. Prerequisite: One year of organic chemistry.

CHE 347 Trace Evidence and Microscopy 4 credits

Lecture and laboratory instruction are given in the analysis of trace evidence typically found in forensic investigation such as hair, fibers, soil, glass and paint. The course focuses on the use of the light microscope, polarized light microscope, scanning electron microscope, and the micro-FTIR as analytical tools. Students will also receive instruction in instrumental and wet chemical methods for the analysis of trace evidence, arson debris, and drugs. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: CHE 111 and CHE 112. Juniors and Seniors only.

CHE 348 Forensic Molecular Biology 4 credits

Lecture and laboratory instruction are given in body fluid stain identification and modern DNA typing methods used in forensic biology. Emphasis is placed on PCR technology and STR fragment analysis. Students are also introduced to mitochondrial DNA typing methods as well as future forensic DNA methodologies. The use and calculation of population statistics used in forensic DNA testing is also discussed. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: BIO 121 and 122, CHE 111 and 112, Juniors and Seniors only.

CHE 349 Professional Issues in Forensic Science 3 credits

Students are introduced to professional issues specific for forensic science practitioners. Topics include the courtroom admissibility of physical evidence, courtroom testimony and report writing. Students are also presented with ethical dilemmas typically encountered by practitioners and discussion centers on their resolution. Standards of ethics codified by professional forensic organizations is also presented. Prerequisite: Seniors in the Forensic Science concentration only.

CHE 352 Chemistry Seminar (Capstone) 2 credits

Student presentations (oral and written) of their research conducted in either CHE 391 or 392, or in an internship. The course represents the integration of all the student's learning and experience in chemistry or biochemistry, and the demonstration of that learning and experience in a formal setting as a requirement for degree completion. As part of this process, the student completes a series of comprehensive examinations in all the relevant sub-disciplines.

CHE 360 Special Topics 1-3 credits each term

A discussion of selected chemistry topics of interest to faculty and students.

CHE 391 and 392 Advanced Laboratory and Research (Capstone) 3 credits each term

Investigations using modern instrumentation and research under the direction of a faculty member, and student presentations of results (in Chemistry 352). Two semesters of research are required. An approved research-based internship may substitute for one or both semesters. Research opportunities related to forensic science are available.

CHE 393 Internship (Capstone) 3-6 credits

Application of chemistry or forensic science in a corporate or public sector setting.

 

COMMUNICATION COURSES

CST 110 Introduction to Communication 3 credits

Introduction to Communication aims to introduce students to the field of Communication and to strengthen students’ communication skills for a variety of situations.  The course accomplishes this through study and training in the basic principles and theories of  communication and through practice in intrapersonal, interpersonal, small-group, and public communication.  The ability to communicate effectively has become increasingly important in helping to determine a person’s success as a responsible citizen, a productive professional, and an understanding human being.  Everyone can improve and develop more confidence in the ability to communicate effectively by understanding the communicative process, training in basic communication principles, and experiencing varied communication situations.

CST 130 Introduction to Film 3 credits

An introduction to the study of film forms and film contents. It provides an historical overview of the development of film from its international premiere in 1906 by the Lumiere Brothers to the diversity of today’s cinema.

CST 170 Introduction to Mass Communication 3 credits

Introduction to a range of approaches and theories that address the concept, character, organization, history and content of mass communication. Students have the opportunity to analyze the practices and products of mass communication in class and to explore the relation between media, reality and knowledge.

CST 180 Introduction to Journalism (WRI-2) 3 credits

An introduction to the theory and practice of journalism. Students analyze, critique and write stories for print and electronic journalism. Contemporary issues in journalism are discussed and debated. Students also learn techniques of newsgathering within a socially responsible and ethical framework.

CST 210  Research in Communication 3 credits

Introduces students to ways to think about and research issues in communication.  It provides students with foundational tools to do research in the field, focusing heavily on qualitative approaches.  Methods include semiotics, content analysis, narrative and genre analysis, ideological and feminist analysis, among others.  Basic quantitative approaches such as surveys and focus groups are also covered.  The course helps students to do improve their research skills for all communication classes, and also prepares them for more in-depth projects later in their course of study, such as the Senior Capstone project. Prerequisite: CST 110.

CST 216 “The Crestiad”: Staff         1-3 credits

Includes all staffing positions on “The Crestiad”: editor-in-chief, managing editor, layout/copy editors, reporters, photographers and columnists. Previous experience on school newspapers or CST 150 recommended.

CST 222  Race And Gender in the Media 3 credits

As consumers and producers of media, it is important that communication majors and non-communication majors critically examine the role of media in forming our beliefs about race, ethnicity, and gender in society.  Media have the ability to shape, challenge, and uphold our beliefs about others and ourselves.  Through this course, students will explore the social construction of race and gender through readings, discussion, and research.  Specifically, the class will focus on critically viewing race and gender in film, television, and print media.  Cross-listed as GND 222.

CST 224 Video Production I 3 credits

An introduction to the multiple elements of video production especially as performed in a studio setting, students gain experience in the operation and coordination of these elements for communication and aesthetic purposes.

CST 225 Digital Photography             3 credits

Intended to teach the basic principles of digital photography to students with little or no background in photography. These principles will be illustrated through lecture, lab work with software, and also field work with a digital camera. Principles and techniques for using digital cameras will be emphasized, along with the ability to use Photoshop Elements, with the intention of providing students the fundamental skills to produce quality digital photographic projects. The course also focuses on both the aesthetics and criticism of photography as a communication medium and art form.

CST 230 Public Relations 3 credits

An exploration of the field of public relations from a variety of perspectives and an outline of the history and development of the field and its growing influence in national and international economies. The fundamentals of public relations writing and ethical issues of public relations practitioners and their audiences are also discussed.

CST 234 Media, Law, and Ethics        3 credits

A study of the historical and philosophical positions that underlie contemporary thinking on issues of press freedom, free speech, privacy, libel, obscenity and social control. These issues derive from our understanding of the nature of our society, of the appropriate role of the media, and of the boundaries between public and private. Plato, Milton, Mill and others provide the background material. In addition to the philosophical and historical material, course content covers current legal thinking as exemplified in court decisions and briefs.

CST 238 Organizational Communications 3 credits

An exploration of both the structural and interpersonal determinants of communication within organizations. Topics cover the role of organizations in the social order, myth and ritual within organizations, communication patterns and roles, communication network and the use of persuasion and identification in organizational socialization.

CST 240 Topics in Film 3 credits

Acquaints students with the critical and analytic tools and language used in the analysis and criticism of film. Various films from different national traditions and time periods are viewed. Topics may include a historical study of film practices and theory as they evolved over time. Selected themes within film criticism, such as Women in Film or Alternative Cinema; or a consideration of the cultural impact of film and media. Course may be repeated once as topics change.

CST 245  Topics in Popular Culture    3 credits

Invites students to explore the phenomena of and to apply the skills of critical analysis to modern popular culture forms such as music, film, television, advertising, sports, fashion, toys, magazines and comic books, and cyberculture, Sample course topics include The Beatles and Bob Dylan in the Sixties, The Sixties: The Second American Revolution, and Modern American Popular Culture. SPA 312: Hispanic Popular Culture in the United States is cross-listed with CST 245 when that course is offered.

CST 260 – 265 Special Topics in Communication 3 credits

CST 270 Debate and Argumentation  3 credits

Teaches the fundamentals of debate preparation and presentation, as well as the process of creating a sound argument and making informed, critical decisions. Students debate current issues through the use of appropriate claims, warrants and evidence. Students also study the types of arguments people make, how those arguments are defended and how to recognize false or misleading claims and propositions.

CST 280  Interpersonal Communication 3 credits

Provides an introduction to the study of interpersonal communication.  Students are able to combine theory and application of communication principles involved in initiating, developing, and maintaining relationships in both personal and small group settings.  The course teaches students to observe and analyze everyday communication (verbal and non-verbal) and to understand the ways language use creates and presupposes moral orders for participants.  Aspects of one-on-one and small group communication are explored, including perception, self-concept, identity, listening, intercultural and gender communication, and conflict management.  Interpersonal communication is defined as face-to-face, dyadic, purposeful, relationship-centered, and meaning-exchanging dialogues.

CST 300 Readings in Communications and Culture 3 credits

Offers students selected debates and issues in contemporary communications theory. Topics studied may include post-structuralism, feminist theory, cultural studies and postmodern critics. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor.

CST 324 Video Production II 3 credits

Students are encouraged to develop “personal styles” as well as their knowledge of various codes and genres used in communicating within that medium. Prerequisite: Communications 224.

CST 330 New Communication Technologies 3 credits

Issues bearing on the relationship between technology and communication are covered. Students examine the rise of printing and the evolution of literacy and explore the influence of radio, film, television and computer technologies on contemporary society and culture. Students are encouraged to identify probable changes arising from the evolution of technology, as well as explore the impact of technology on their daily lives.

CST 352 Senior Capstone Seminar    3 credits

Students conduct research for a chosen thesis topic. They are expected to present their work-in-progress in class and to engage in the critique and assessment of each other’s work. Offered in the spring only. Prerequisite CST 210.

CST 390 Independent Study 1-3 credits

 

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS COURSES

CIS 101 Technology for the Information Age 3 credits

A study of computers and their impact on our personal and professional lives. Course content is divided into two major areas: general computer knowledge and use of application software. Topics include hardware and software, internal representation of data, history and classifications of computers, user interfaces, networks, societal issues, and use of spreadsheet, word processing, database, presentation, and communication software packages. Prerequisite: Familiarity with the basic operation of the personal computer.

CIS 106 Computer Graphics and Design 3 credits

The use of graphics and/or computer-aided design software for drawing and design in a wide variety of application areas. The course will cover fundamental commands, graphics primitives, editing, enhancing drawings, output, and dimensioning. Prerequisite: CIS 101 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 117 Foundations of Computing and Information Systems 3 credits

The student will explore the fundamental principles of computer-based information systems and the informed utilization of those systems to increase the efficiency and effectiveness of the business entity. The course provides a conceptual framework for understanding the information needs of business and other organizations, and introduces current and emerging IS strategies and techniques in the management of computer systems. Prerequisite: CIS 101 or equivalent computer experience.

CIS 135 Introduction to Computer Programming 3 credits

An introduction to computer programming with emphasis   on a complete problem solving approach. Students learn basic programming constructs including sequential program flow, selection, and iteration. Interactive and file  input/out processing is used. Modular program development techniques are stressed. Array processing is presented.  Prerequisites: none, but general computer literacy and an  understanding of high-school algebra is assumed.

CIS 136 Advanced Computer Programming 3 credits

A continuation of CIS 135, this course examines programming techniques and programming language  features used to solve larger, more complex problems.  Topics include advanced string processing,  object-oriented programming, templates, and an  introduction to data structures. Prerequisite: CIS 135

CIS 190 Programming Team 1 credit

Offers the student the opportunity to further refine C++ programming skills in a competitive environment. Students work in teams to solve problems within predefined time limits. Students will encounter advanced programming techniques not otherwise offered in other courses. Selected students will represent Cedar Crest College at an outside programming competition. Pass/Fail. May be taken multiple times. Prerequisite: CSC 136.

CIS 215 Advanced Business Computing 3 credits

The application of advanced features of spreadsheet software and database management software to solve business problems through computer modeling and other techniques. Emphasis is placed on large application development and user-interface design. Computer techniques using other business software and the role of the computer in shaping business are also considered. Prerequisite: CIS 101 or prior experience with spreadsheet and database software.

CIS 220 User Interface Programming  3 credits

An examination of various graphical user interfaces and standards. The student then applies these principles to several projects in prototype design in Visual Basic. Prerequisites: CIS 135.

CIS 224 Discrete Mathematics for Computer Science 3 credits

Teaches students to think mathematically, including an understanding of important mathematical concepts as well as a sense of why these concepts are important for applications. Emphasis will be placed on mathematical reasoning, combinatorial analysis, discrete structures, algorithmic thinking, and applications and modeling. Prerequisite: CIS 135.

CIS 243 Computer and Communications Networks 3 credits

An exploration of fundamentals of data communications and modern computer networks. Topics include information representation, basic data communications, transmission media, flow control, the OSI (Open Systems Interconnect) model, TCP/IP, and Local Area Networks. Prerequisite: CIS 117.

CIS 255 Programming the World Wide Web 3 credits

An exploration of techniques and technologies used in the development of web server-based applications. Topics include the Common Gateway Interface (CGI), form processing, cookies, and session management. Programming languages commonly used for web server programming, such as Perl and PHP, are presented. Client-side support for web applications, including JavaScript and the Document Object Model, are also discussed. Prerequisite: CIS 135.

CIS 302 Relational Database Systems 3 credits

An introduction to relation database management systems. Topics covered include data models (ER and relational model), data storage and access methods (files, indices), query languages (SQL,QBE), query evaluation, query optimization, transaction management, concurrency control, crash recovery, and some advanced topics (distributed databases, object-relational databases). A large component of the course is a project that involves implementing and testing components of a relation database management system. Prerequisite: CIS 117.

CIS 319 Decision Support Technology 3 credits

An introduction to techniques and technologies that use computer resources to improve human decision-making effectiveness. Theories of the human decision-making process, methodologies to develop decision support systems to assist these processes, knowledge-based systems augmenting human knowledge and expertise to increase productivity and enhance outcomes, and current developments in decision support systems, artificial intelligence, and expert systems are discussed. Prerequisite: CIS 117.

CIS 328 Systems Software and Hardware 3 credits

A study of the major features of hardware and software components of a computer system. Computer architecture topics include processor and memory organization, address and instruction formats, computer arithmetic, and interrupts. Operating systems topics include process and memory management, device and resource management, virtual memory, interprocess communication, deadlock, and security. Prerequisites: CIS 135 or permission of the instructor.

CIS 340 Algorithms and Applications 3 credits

An exploration of classic algorithms and their application in the real world using advanced features of the C++ programming language. Algorithm run-time complexity is examined with respect to the impact on applications. Advanced sorting and searching techniques are examined. Common file organizations and file processing techniques are presented. Prerequisite: CIS 136.

CIS 351 Systems Analysis and Design (capstone) 3 credits

An in-depth exploration of the processes involved in building large-scale software systems. This course follows through the various stages of the software life cycle from requirements planning through implementation. Analysis will involve system input and output, database specifications, user interface, and file organization. Prerequisites: CIS 135 and (CIS 215 or CIS 302).

 

CRIMNAL JUSTICE COURSES

CRJ 101 The Legal System 3 credits

The Legal System introduces the student to the concept of crime; explaining and defining the legal system from the point when a crime is committed through to the disposition, or sentencing.  It examines how the individual components of the system; law enforcement; the courts; and corrections, influence society’s overall response to crime.  An understanding of the legal process is one of the building blocks of developing an understanding of the social causes, consequences, and responses to dysfunctional behavior.

CRJ 106 Criminology 3 credits

This course is designed to introduce the student to the systematic study of crime and the criminal justice system, including the police, courts and prisons.  This course will examine ideas such as social control, the social causes and social definitions of crime as well as society’s reaction to crime and criminal behavior.  It also focuses on the impact issues such as race, gender, ethnicity and social class have on crime.  Policy decisions regarding the police and law enforcement, the courts, juvenile offenders, crime victims, and the various functions of punishment including retribution, social protection, rehabilitation and deterrence are also examined.

The course is designed to be taught in three distinct units.  The first unit will examine what is crime; how is it defined; why is it measured; and how is it measured.  The second unit will deal with the study of crime theory.  We will discuss the origins of crime theory, and evaluate the major biological, psychological, sociological and environmental theories.  The third and final stage will examine crime typologies and the profiling of criminal offenders.

CRJ 201 Addictions, Psychopatholog and Crime 3 credits

The primary objective of this course is to focus on the linkages between substance addiction, the psychopathology of addictive behaviors and its impact on crime.  Specific content areas will highlight current trends in substance abuse; the influence substance use/abuse has had on behavior, on the criminal justice system and on trends in law enforcement.

CRJ 206 Class, Race, Gender and Crime 3 credits

This course explores the social relationship between class, race, gender and crime.  It attempts to account for differences in crime social boundaries, social make-up and social status.  It further examines the behavior of law itself and how the making of laws is influenced by class, race, and gender.

CRJ 211 Criminal Justice Ethics          3 credits

There is perhaps no more appropriate place for the study of ethics than in the criminal justice profession.  In order for a society to have a system of enforcement of social rules and norms, it must first establish a standard measure of ethical behavior.  This course will examine how a society establishes moral and ethical behavior; the challenges faced by the establishment of a system of enforcement; and the dilemmas faced by those charged with enforcement.  It will examine the ethical issues raised by things such as Megan’s Law; hate crimes; gun control; legalization of drugs; DNA testing; and racial profiling.  It will also examine the individual ethical dilemmas faced by the people who are considered criminal justice professionals.

CRJ 301 Juvenile Justice 3 credits

Mass media coverage of some of America’s most violent episodes, perpetrated by the youth of our society, has renewed the debate over the adequacy of the juvenile justice system.  This course will examine the juvenile justice system at great length, focusing on; the major differences between the adult and juvenile systems; the rehabilitative nature of juvenile justice; the balance of treatment versus punishment; the legal framework for the juvenile justice system; evaluating juvenile misbehavior; and the effectiveness of court intervention and punishment.  Students will be exposed to concepts and issues most often debated by criminal justice advocates and opponents and analyze the appropriateness of both ends of the debate.

CRJ 306 Corrections: Crisis in America 3 credits

The American corrections system is in crisis facing an unprecedented incarceration rate and high numbers of repeat offenders.  This course, taught by a prison warden, is designed to examine the effectiveness of the often conflicting four justifications for punishment: retribution; deterrence; rehabilitation; and social protection.  Progressive approaches to incarceration will be explored as well as current trends in alternatives to incarceration.  The inmate subculture will be examined together with a critical look at the overcrowding epidemic facing today’s prison administrators.

CRJ 311 Crime and Place 3 credits

This course focuses on the social ecology of crime in that it examines the relationship between crime, victimization and the environment.  Ecological theory examines spatial and temporal patterns of criminal conduct and victimization.  This course also examines community and environmental strategies which have been developed to reduce the likelihood of criminal behavior.

CRJ 316 Crime and Public Policy        3 credits

This course explains how crime; the public perception of crime; and the political reaction to crime influence public policy in the United States.  Each component of the criminal justice system will be examined, including; the courts; police; the prosecutor; and corrections; evaluating how public policy effects each component.

CRJ 321 Criminal Justice Field Experience 3 credits

The field experience is designed to provide the student an opportunity to integrate and reconcile theoretical concepts and principles learned in other social science and criminal justice courses and apply them in work environments within the criminal justice profession.  The field experience initiates the beginning of the lifelong professional learning process through which the student must learn to navigate.

CRJ 325 Criminal Justice Research Methods and Design 4 credits

Provides criminal justice professionals with the understanding of a scientific, analytical approach to knowledge building. Examines the concepts of theory development, conceptualization and hypothesis formulation across criminal justice fields of practice. The content includes research design, sampling, instrumentation, methods of data collection and analysis as well as descriptive inferential statistics and critical analysis of empirical research. The student will develop an original research project.

CRJ 326 Criminal Justice Field Experience Seminar 3 credits

The Field Experience Seminar is designed to assist the student in processing the experiences one has at the field experience assignment.  The seminar is taken concurrently with the field experience and provides an opportunity to integrate and reconcile theoretical concepts and principles learned in other social science and criminal justice courses and apply them in working within the criminal justice profession.

As students enter the field as interns their concerns will be more on practical issues.  As a result, the course is designed as an open discussion forum allowing the professor and students to examine practical issues and discuss their integration with classroom concepts.  The integration of these concepts is the central purpose of the course.

Students will be asked to link professional events to theoretical concepts and will be asked to examine these events within the context of professional and personal ethics.

CRJ 331 Leadership for Women in Criminal Justice 3 credits

The Cedar Crest curriculum has been carefully designed to produce female graduates who are well prepared to assume leadership roles in the criminal justice profession.  This capstone course for the criminal justice major is the culmination of that experience and is intended to allow each student to develop a greater understanding of the challenges faced by the women who choose to pursue these positions.

During the course of the curriculum, careful attention is given to developing the student’s critical thinking and problem solving skills in an attempt to better prepare them for a role in criminal justice management.  A student’s preparation would be incomplete, however, without an understanding of the challenges and barriers faced by women in this profession.

To accomplish this goal, students will be required to produce a research paper examining the unique challenges faced by women who attempt to pursue management positions in any given sector of the profession.  Each student will be asked to choose a specific occupation of interest and conduct a literature review examining the role women assume in that profession and the obstacles they must overcome to excel.  Additionally, each student must perform field research designed to validate the literature review by discussing with professionals the challenges they have faced in their pursuit of managerial responsibility.

By requiring such a project, Cedar Crest strives to produce professionals that understand the challenges posed by such a demanding profession, and by doing so, will better prepare them to assume higher levels of responsibility.

 

DANCE COURSES

DNC 102 Experiencing Movement I    3 credits

An experiential survey of dance to identify and explore the theoretical, analytical and creative aspects of dance as art. This course is also a stylistic investigation of dance that introduces the elements of style, their physical causes and usages as explored through the medium of dance.

DNC 104 Experiencing Movement II   3 credits

A continuing survey of dance as art. Prerequisite: DNC 102.

DNC 113 Body Listening 1 credit

An introduction to techniques used to release stress and tensions in the body and to assist the individual to develop an efficient use of body energy.

DNC 115 Human Movement Potential 1 credit

A movement class implementing the conceptual and anatomical approaches to dance. This somatic (mind/body) approach can be used by dancers, actors, musicians and singers to initiate improvements in technique and performance. For the non-movement-or performance-oriented student, this course is a way to explore and effectively use the mind/body connection.

DNC 211 Beginner Ballet 1.5 credits

A sequence of physical experiences designed to introduce the student to classical ballet technique. Attention is given to alignment, musicality and ballet vocabulary. May be repeated.

DNC 213/313 Intermediate Ballet     1.5 credits

A continuation of beginning ballet with an increase in the level of technical difficulty. Attention is given to alignment, musicality and a broader knowledge of ballet terminology. May be repeated.

DNC 216 Beginner Jazz 1.5 credits

A sequence of physical experiences designed to introduce the student to jazz dance technique. Attention is given to alignment, musicality and jazz dance vocabulary. May be repeated.

DNC 218 Intermediate Jazz 1.5 credits

A continuation of jazz dance skills learned at the beginner level with an increase in the level of difficulty.

Attention is given to alignment, musicality and jazz dance vocabulary. May be repeated.

DNC 220 Beginning Modern 1.5 credits

Using the expressive nature of movement as a guide to listen, explore and integrate body knowledge, modern dance helps facilitate self-knowledge and individual creativity through implementation of factual information, imagery, guided movement exploration and dialogue. No previous dance experience is required. May be repeated.

DNC 223 Beginning Tap 1.5 credits

An introduction to the fundamentals of tap dancing; may be repeated.

DNC 225 Intermediate Tap 1.5 credits

DNC 226 Dance Improvisation

A form of dance that provides an explorative environment to investigate the creation of movement. Students will explore their own bodies, their relationship to other bodies, and how these relationships are affected by gravity, weight, momentum, and inertia. This class will incorporate solo, duet, and group experiences. Guided exercises will provide a basis for rolling, falling, balance/counterbalance, and weight sharing. The guided exercises will lead into time for free improvisation.

DNC 321 Dance Composition II

Further exploration of the movement tools used to create and structure solo and group dance.  Prerequisite: DNC 320.

DNC 230/330 Intermediate Modern      1.5 credits

Creative challenges and problem solving are implemented through movement to stimulate, discover and create linkages with ourselves, others and our world. May be repeated.

DNC 235 History of Dance I 3 credits

An exploration of the history of dance from ancient civilizations to the 19th century. It approaches dance as an art form and a social matrix through which humans express and maintain their cultural values, societal relationships and history.

DNC 236 Cultural Dynamics of Movement 3 credits

This course uses dance as a medium to communicate, explore and understand cultural diversity.

DNC 237 History of Dance II 3 credits

A continuation of Dance History I with an emphasis on dance in the 19th and 20th centuries. Prerequisite for Dance majors: DNC 235.

DNC 252  Student Dance Concert 1 credit

Student choreographers under the supervision of the student dance concert director may receive one credit for developing and presenting original choreographed works accepted into the Student Dance Concert. Student choreographers are expected to present their original choreography for adjudication in the November the preceding the concert. May be repeated each year. Students must register for audit or credit.

DNC 253 Dance Company .5 per company per term

The Cedar Crest College Dance Company is the performing dance ensemble of the College. Performances may include participation in the productions presented by the Stage Company, the fall and spring dance concerts and informal presentations throughout the year. Works in ballet, jazz, tap and modern dance presented in the concerts are choreographed by faculty and professional choreographers. Pieces selected for excellence from previous student performances may be included in the spring concert. Membership is by audition only; auditions are held each fall. To maintain membership, company members are required to register for one dance technique course per year. Membership in the dance company is a two-semester commitment. Students may be selected for one or more companies: ballet, tap, modern or jazz for .5 credits each term for each company. Check with instructor for last day to withdraw.

DNC 260 Special Topics: African Dance (offered during spring semester)

This course explores the movement traditions of Africa and the connection to African beliefs, values, rituals and practices.

DNC 260 Special Topics: Dance Therapy (offered during fall semester)

This course is an introduction to the therapeutic use of movement to improve the mental and physical well being of a person. It focuses on the connection between the mind and body to promote health and healing.

DNC 280 Dance Pedagogy 3 credits

A study of the values of experimental inquiry. It will integrate studio experiences with classroom experiences, class discussions, observations, reading, writing, teaching practice, and reflection to illuminate and advance the professional practice of dance teachers. The course is grounded in values of critical pedagogy and reflective practice. Prerequisites: DNC 102, DNC 104.

DNC 320 Dance Composition 3 credits

An introduction to the movement tools used to create and structure dance. Students must have the movement technique and vocabulary to physically implement these concepts and be creative through movement problem solving. Prerequisite: DNC 102, 104 and 211 or 221 or 216 or 223.

DNC 331 Advanced Ballet 1.5 credits

A sequence of classical ballet technique classes with emphasis placed on combining ballet vocabulary to achieve fluid movement phrases. Attention is given to the artistry of dance. May be repeated.

DNC 332 Advanced Jazz 1.5 credits

Provides an awareness of the broader theories of jazz dance. They expand vocabulary and challenge technical abilities by creating designs in space through body positions and movements. Attention is given to the artistry of dance and combining jazz dance vocabulary to achieve fluid movement phrases. May be repeated.

DNC 333 Advanced Modern Dance 1.5 credits

May be repeated.

DNC 334 Advanced Tap 1.5 credits

May be repeated.

DNC 390 Independent Study in Dance 1-3 credits

Must have a declared major in dance and junior status.

 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION COURSES

ECE 101 Introduction to Early Childhood Education     3 credits 

An analysis of the early childhood education field with focus on historical, social and philosophical background as well as on current and future critical issues in the field. Discussion of developmentally appropriate practices, current teaching trends and best practices as define by national professional organization principles and standards.  The role of the family in early childhood education is highlighted.  

ECE 301 Early Childhood Education Assessment I     3 credits

This course prepares the Early Childhood Educator to develop appropriate assessment tools for grades Pre-K to 4.  This course is the first of two assessment courses for the Early Childhood pre-service educator.  This course emphasizes the bases for classroom assessments and the use and interpretation of standardized tests.  (Prerequisites: ECE 101, 150, and 200)

ECE 302 Early Childhood Education Assessment II     3 credits

This course prepares the Early Childhood Educator to develop appropriate assessment tools for grades Pre-K to 4.  This course is the second of two assessment courses for the Early Childhood pre-service educator.  This course emphasizes the creation and use of classroom assessments and grading options.  (Prerequisite: ECE 301)

ECE 305 Issues and Advoccacy in Early Childhood Education     3 credits

Prospective early childhood educators will study and reflect on the ethical and professional responsibilities of the early childhood profession. This course provides an overview of critical issues and developing family and community collaborative partnerships. Candidates will develop problem solving strategies and the expertise necessary to become a reflective decision maker and advocate for families of students with and without exceptional learning needs. Focus will be on establishing and sustaining partnerships with families and linking families to appropriate community resources. (Prerequisites: EDU 150 and 200 and ECE 101)

ECE 307 Emergent Literacy (PreK-Grade 1)     3 credits

Provides prospective PreK-Grade 1 teachers with an understanding of early pre-literacy abilities and a conceptual understanding of the components of reading in the areas of phonological awareness, phonemic awareness, phonics, word study, and word awareness. Prospective teachers will develop competencies in planning and implementing learning experiences for emergent and developmental literacy using Pennsylvania learning standards PreK-Grade 1 for language arts including speaking, listening, reading, and writing. (Prerequisites: EDU 150)

 

ECONOMICS COURSES

ECO 101 Principles of Economics: Macro 3 credits

An overview of basic economic concepts and principles and an analysis of how markets allocate resources in a capitalist economy, followed by an examination of the factors that determine inflation, interest rates, employment and total output in terms of several models of aggregate economic activity, and a study of the monetary and fiscal institutions involved in formulating economic policy.

ECO 102 Principles of Economics: Micro 3 credits

First, an overview of basic economic concepts and principles and an analysis of how resources are allocated in capitalist economies and in alternative economic systems, then a focus on the role of government in a market economy and the efficiency of market structures ranging from pure competition to monopoly. The course concludes with a brief survey of international economics.

ECO 201 Government, Business & Society 3 credits

Provides a framework for understanding the interrelationships among business, government and society as they affect management decisions. The course examines the roles and responsibilities of business in a market economy; the political, social and economic forces that determine the legal and regulatory environment of business; and ethical issues related to business decisions. Prerequisite: ECO 102 or permission of instructor.

ECO 222 Economic Geography           3 credits

Uses an international perspective to examine how history and location interact with global economic forces to influence economic, social and political development. Among the topics covered are the effects of the end of colonialism and the end of the Cold War; the causes of poverty in underdeveloped countries; theories of economic development; population growth; pollution and resource depletion; and patterns and policies of international trade and investment.

ECO 260 Special Topics                    1-3 credits

This course is a mini-course of topical interest.

ECO 302 Labor Economics                  3 credits

A micro and macro labor-market analysis, including such topics as: wage determination; wage differentials; labor mobility; relationships among wages, prices and employment; labor productivity; and labor’s share of national income. Prerequisite: ECO 102, or permission of the instructor.

ECO 304 Money and Banking               3 credits

An analysis of the markets for financial assets and the institutions that provide them. The course covers topics such as the nature and functions of money, depository and non-depository intermediaries, the determinants of asset prices and interest rates and the role of financial markets and instruments in risk management. Prerequisite: Economics 101, 102.

ECO 315 International Economics       3 credits

An exploration of the theory, policies and markets of international trade and finance. The following topics are covered: international specialization and exchange, exchange rate determination, balance of payments disturbances and adjustments, the effects of tariffs and quotas, international agencies and agreements, and foreign exchange markets. Prerequisite: ECO 101, 102.

ECO 390 Independent Study              1-3 credits

 

EDUCATION COURSES

EDU 100 Perspectives on Middle Level and Secondary Education     3 credits

A problem-centered approach to the historical, philosophical, political, sociological foundations, and the organization of the American educational system as it relates to the middle grades 4 – 8 and secondary level. Content will include accurate and specific content related to the history and philosophy of middle grades. This course is a pre-requisite to all other middle level and secondary education courses.

EDU 141 Nutrition Health and Safety     3 credits

This class will provide an overview of the philosophy, principles and assessment of nutrition, health and safety for young children.  Emphasis on the importance of nutrition, fitness, health and safety to an individual’s overall performance and behavior will be addressed.  

EDU 150 Educational Planning     3 credits

This course will enable the student will develop, implement, assess and modify curriculum and lessons for all learners in grades PreK – 4 and grades 4 - 8. The student will plan and design two cohesive unit plans. Through the unit plans the student will demonstrate the ability to apply and implement lesson plans based upon effective teaching methods grounded in research. The student will understand other important factors such as: principles of curriculum, instructional strategies, assessment, and classroom management as they relate to teaching and learning.

 EDU 151 Field Experience I     1 credit

The prospective teacher will spend at least three hours per week (for a minimum of 40 documented observation hours) observing in the classroom. The prospective teacher will process elements such as school environment, behavior management strategies and teacher decision making procedure among others. Through reflection and journal activities, the students will record and respond to their experiences and observations. Corequisite: EDU 150

EDU 200 Educational Psychology     3 credits

This course is a foundational review of the impact and utilization of psychology in the early childhood and middle level classroom.  The course examines the basic requirements for teachers to work effectively with concepts of learning and behavior across the school age developmental spectrum.  Special attention is noted with the inclusion of multicultural and special education concerns relating to learning and behavior. Students will be introduced to the process of identifying best practices to address the needs of early childhood and middle level students, including those students with special learning needs.

EDU 306 Technology for Education     3 credits

This course is designed to demonstrate and utilize a variety of methods and strategies for integrating technology into the classroom. Students will have an opportunity to use and discuss current technologies being used in today's schools. Practical application and strategies will be a primary emphasis. Home access to the Internet and MS Office products is recommended.

EDU 308 Integrating the Arts Across the Curriculum     3 credits

Students taking this course will gain knowledge about national standards in the arts. They will learn about state and local standards for elementary and secondary-level students. This course is designed to provide students with the opportunity to integrate the art disciplines (i.e. drama, dance, visual art and music) across the academic curriculum. This course will provide the current theories, standards and applications on how to integrate the arts across the curriculum. In addition, students will apply these academic standards to lesson plan design, unit development and a final, Arts inspired presentation.

EDU 311 Literacy I: Grades 2-4     3 credits

Provides prospective Grades 2-4 teachers with the knowledge and skills to plan and implement literacy experiences grounded in NCTE, IRA, and PDE standards for speaking, listening, reading and writing. Prospective teachers acquire a conceptual understanding of the components of reading in the areas of phonological/phonemic awareness and phonics. A heavy emphasis is placed on fluency, vocabulary, comprehension, and writing in a balanced literacy program.

EDU 312 Literacy II: Developmental & Remedial Literacy in the Middle Grade             3 credits

Provides prospective middle school teachers with the knowledge and skills to plan, implement, and assess literacy experiences grounded in NCTE/IRA and PDE Standards for speaking, listening, reading, and writing. Prospective teachers acquire an understanding of the use of research-based programs and quality literature as the basis for the developmental literacy curriculum in grades 4-8 with particular focus on fostering reading comprehension, critical thinking, process writing, language arts skills, and remediation of literacy difficulties. Strategies for accommodating the needs of exceptional and culturally and linguistically diverse students are included.  Prerequisite: EDU 150.  Co-requisite: EDU 315: Field Experience II Middle Level and Secondary.  

EDU 313 Field Experience II: Early Childhood Education     1 Credit

A structured field experience that consists of observations and participation in the teaching of reading and language arts in the elementary and middle school. Students plan, implement, and assess instruction and gain feedback from a cooperating mentor teacher.  The course focuses on helping students process the theory-praxis relationship as it relates to the balanced reading program approach. Students spend 3 - 4 hours each week in a field placement (semester total 50 hours) and participate in four class sessions for processing their field experiences. Co-requisite:  EDU 311.

EDU 314 Adolescent Literacy     3 credits

Designed for students preparing to teach in the secondary schools (grades 7-12). This course will examine the skills needed for reading in the secondary academic content classroom, and strategies for improving the reading and study skills of secondary students. Students will become aware of strategies for integrating authentic literature into their academic content areas. Prerequisite:  EDU 150. Co-requisite: EDU 315. 

EDU 315 Field Experience II: Middle Level and Secondary     1 credit

This field experience focuses on helping the prospective teachers process the theory-praxis relationship as it relates to the role of reading comprehension and processing in a specific content area. Prospective teachers spend 3.5 - 4 hours each week in a middle school or high school classroom in their content area in order to complete the required 50 hours of field experience.  The student must participate in four class sessions for processing their field experiences. Co-requisite: EDU 312 or EDU 314.

EDU 317 Curriculum, Assessment, and Learning Experiences in Science for Early Childhood Educators     3 credits

Students are exposed to the various methodologies to successfully teach science to elementary students, integrating hands on activities, and challenging extensions to standard lesson/activities. The classes are modeled on the constructivist approach to science education. This course is based on an understanding of physical, life, earth and space science concepts. National and PDE standards are used extensively for curriculum and assessment development.  Prerequisite EDU 150.

EDU 319 Curriculum, Assessment, and Learning Experiences for Social Studies for Early Childhood Educators     3 credits

Prospective elementary school teachers explore a variety of strategies for providing students with standards-based learning experiences in history, geography, economics and political science including current events.  A strong emphasis is placed on students’ ability to plan, model, and reflect upon their teaching. Prerequisite courses:  EDU 150.

 EDU 321 Field Experience III: Elementary     1 credit

This couse is a structured field experience that involves participation in teaching science, social studies and mathematics in an elementary classroom.  Students plan, implement and assess standards based instruction, analyze their own competencies in classroom management and receive feedback from a cooperating mentor teacher.  Students explore issues related to diversity and social studies education, spend an average of three hours each week (total of 50 hours)i n an elementary classroom and participate in four class sessions to process their field experiences.  This course must be taken with the last of the following courses: EDU 312, 317, 319 or 332.

EDU 332 Curriculum, Assessment, and Learning Experiences in Mathematics for Early Childhood Educators PK-4     3 credits

This course focuses on the methods, materials, and content necessary for teaching (PK – 4) Mathematics. One purpose is to acquaint pre-service teachers with the Pennsylvania Department of Education (PDE) Math standards and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) standards. The second purpose is to provide the math content, methodology, and pedagogy necessary for the pre-service teachers to become confident in their ability to provide these services to their students. This course will present a range of developmental activities, which will prepare the pre-service teacher to work effectively in a contemporary classroom, and to help children construct mathematical knowledge.

EDU 335 Creative Drama in Education     3 credits

This three-credit course is designed to demonstrate through theory, practical applications and experimental projects the uses and implementation of creative drama strategies in any early childhood, middle level or secondary school curriculum. Classes will consist of mini-lectures, discussions and active participation in a variety of creative drama activities.  The theories of Theatre-In-Education specialists in the forefront of creative drama will be discussed, analyzed, and put to practical use.

EDU 340 Differentiated Reading Instruction for the Primary Grades     3 Credits

This course prepares the early childhood educator to differentiate their instruction for the PreK through Grade 4 classroom settings. A primary focus is on current intervention strategies that meet the needs of all students in the areas of reading, writing, and assessment. This course involves the prospective teacher in combining current reading research and theory with the teaching methodologies that have been proven most effective with students in the elementary grades. Prerequisites: ECE 101, ECE 307, EDU 150. 

EDU 346 Curriculum, Assessment, and Learning Experiences for Secondary Science and Mathematics     3 credits

Students are exposed to the various methodologies to successfully teach mathematics and science to secondary students, integrating hands on activities with various manipulatives, challenging extensions to standard lessons/activities, and an extensive introduction to TI family of graphing calculators, CBL2, and Vernier sensors to collect real data for the above activities. The classes are modeled by the instructor on the constructivist approach to science and mathematics education. National and PDE standards are used extensively for curriculum and assessment development.

A membership in the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics or National Science Teachers Association is required and online discussions are related to articles from the NCTM or NSTA journals for the secondary teacher and recent mathematics and science education research. This course is enhanced with on-line educational experiences utilizing College. Prerequisite: EDU 150. Co-requisite: EDU 350.

EDU 347 Curriculum, Assessment, and Learning Experiences for Secondary Social Studies     3 credits

Prepares prospective secondary and middle school teachers to design, implement, and assess learning experiences that foster the development of competencies outlined in state and national standards that guide the discipline.  A strong emphasis is placed on students’ ability to plan, model, and reflect upon their teaching. Prerequisite:  EDU 150. Co-requisite: EDU 350.

EDU 348 Curriculum, Assessment and Learning Experiences for Secondary English   3 credits

Prepares prospective secondary and middle school teachers to design, implement, and assess learning experiences that foster the development of competencies outlined in state and national standards that guide the discipline.  A strong emphasis is placed on students’ ability to plan, model, and reflect upon their teaching. Prerequisite: EDU 150. Co-requisite:  EDU 350.

EDU 349 Curriculum, Assessment and Learning Experiences for K-12 World Language     3 credits

Prepares prospective secondary and middle school teachers to design, implement, and assess learning experiences that foster the development of competencies outlined in state and national standards that guide the discipline.  A strong emphasis is placed on students’ ability to plan, model, and reflect upon their teaching. Prerequisite: EDU 150.  Co-requisite:  EDU 350. 

 EDU 350 Field Experience III: Secondary     1 credit

This course is a structured field experience that involves participation in teaching middle school or secondary biology, chemistry, general science, mathematics, social studies, French, Spanish, or English. Students plan, implement, and evaluate learning experiences in their content area, analyze their competencies in classroom management, and gain feedback from a cooperating mentor teacher. Students are required to spend 3.5 – 4 hours in the classroom setting for a total of 50 hours. In addition, students are required to participate in four class sessions to process their experiences. Co-requisite: EDU 346, EDU 347, EDU 348, or EDU 349.

EDU 359 Teaching the Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Student     3 credits

This course prepares the elementary and secondary teacher to meet the special needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students in the PK-12 general education classroom. The course content will be focused on Foundations of language and culture and Applications related to standards-based instruction, assessment, and professionalism for pre-service teacher candidates. Students will develop an understanding of the impact of being a non-native English speaker on the learning process and socialization in the classroom. Intercultural communication skills and a variety of instructional strategies will be acquired. 

EDU 372 Student Teaching: Elementary Schools     9 credits

The student will spend the entire semester in a full-time experience in K-6 classrooms partnering elementary and middle schools under the guidance of a mentor teacher and a supervisor from the college.  Prospective teachers receive aily feedback on the mastery of professional education competencies from the cooperating mentor teacher and weekly feedback from observation by the college supervisor.  (Capstone Experience) Co-requisite: EDU 374.

EDU 373 Student Teaching: Secondary Schools     9 credits

The student will spend the entire semester in a full-time partnering middle and high schools under the guidance of a mentor teacher and a supervisor from the college. Prospective teachers receive daily feedback on the mastery of professional education competencies from the cooperating mentor teacher and weekly feedback from observation by the college supervisor. (Capstone Experience) Co-requisite EDU 374

EDU 374 Professional Education Seminar     3 credits

A seminar that is taken with EDU 372 or EDU 373 and is designed to cover topics of importance related to the student teaching experience and the issues related to  professionalism of the new professional educator. Major topics include: professional portfolio development, interviewing techniques, professionalism and ethics; topics related to teacher professional competencies; as well as other topics of current interest and value.

 

ENGLISH COURSES

Satisfaction of the WRI-1 requirement is a prerequisite for all English courses with the exception of ENG 201, ENG 202, ENG 205, ENG 220, ENG 223, ENG 225, and ENG 280.

ENG 200 Literary Analysis 3 credits

An introduction to genre, basic terminology and theory, emphasizing analytical strategies for reading and writing about literary texts. Class discussions and papers approach the different genres – poetry, fiction, essay and drama – from various critical perspectives and provide practice in interpretation and evaluation. This class is strongly recommended, although not required, before taking 300-level literature courses. Students intending to major in English should take this course first.

ENG 201 Survey of British Literature I 3 credits

British literature from the Old English period through the 18th century. Offered every year in the fall semester. Satisfaction of the WRI-1 requirement is not a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 202 Survey of British Literature II 3 credits

British literature from the Romantic period to the present. Offered every year in the spring semester. Satisfaction of the WRI-1 requirement is not a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 203 Literary Research Methods 3 credits

Literary Research Methods, in building upon the skills taught in ENG 200: Literary Analysis, teaches the process of scholarly textual inquiry and research. We’ll explore the richness of literary texts and how they establish meaning—from their straightforward declarations to their suggestive ambiguities—by learning the craft of the close analysis of language and examining the ways in which our theoretical points of view affect the process of that interpretation. We’ll also examine strategies for how to read, evaluate, and apply scholarship in forming our literary interpretations. Along the way, we’ll make use of the tools of the literary scholar (e.g., digital archives and specialized reference books and databases) and consider the politics of the profession:  how did literary studies come to be, and why do we read the texts that we do?  By mastering the essentials of textual analysis and research, students will emerge prepared for advanced coursework in English.

ENG 205 Survey of World Literature I: The Ancient World to the 17th Century 3 credits

Beginning with the Mesopotamian tales of Inanna and Gilgamesh, this survey of world literature in English translation introduces students to significant works of prose, verse, and drama from ancient times through the Renaissance. Writing assignments and discussion apply the tools of literary analysis (i.e., literary devices, modes, and genres) in exploring thematic and intellectual connections within and between diverse literary traditions, including those of ancient Greece and Rome, Asia, Africa, India, and Europe.

ENG 220 Survey of American Literature 3 credits

American literature from the colonial period to the present. Offered every year in the fall semester. Satisfaction of the WRI-1 requirement is not a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 223 Topics in American Literature 3 credits

Traces developments in significant thematic areas of American literature and film. Previous topics include nature, the city, Native American literature, and horror. Satisfaction of the WRI-1 requirement is not a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 225 Topics in British Literature 3 credits

A study of a theme or genre within British literature, often but not necessarily transcending historical periods.  Typical course subjects may include British fantasy, Victorian pop fiction, British Gothic literature, and landscape in British literature. Satisfaction of the WRI-1 requirement is not a prerequisite for this course.

ENG 233 Creative Writing: Fiction 3 credits

An introductory workshop in the craft of fiction. Students will analyze the work of established authors and learn strategies for developing their own material. Students will analyze the work of established authors and learn strategies for developing their own material. Emphasis is on the process of writing. Offered each year in the fall semester.

ENG 234 Creative Writing: Poetry 3 credits

An introductory workshop in the craft of poetry. Students will analyze the work of established authors and learn strategies for developing their own material. Emphasis is on the process of writing. Offered every year in the spring semester.

ENG 235 Topics in Nonfiction Writing 3 credits

A workshop offering practice in strategies for writing the essay, the focus of this course changes from year to year and may be repeated for credit with permission of instructor.

ENG 241 Topics in the Novel 3 credits

An introduction to the novel as a genre and an exploration of its cultural and literary significance.  Course content and approach varies from semester to semester.

ENG 242 Topics in the Short Story 3 credits

An introduction, through close readings and analysis, to characteristic examples of the short story in the English language.  Course content and approach varies from semester to semester.

ENG 243 Topics in Poetry 3 credits

An introduction to the various forms, modes, and schools of poetry, and an exploration of the activity of reading poetry.  Course content and approach varies from semester to semester.

ENG 244 Topics in Dramatic Literature 3 credits

An introduction, through close readings and analysis, to characteristic examples of drama in the English language.  Course content and approach varies from semester to semester.

ENG 260 Special Topics 3 credits

Highlights special topics that supplement the department’s regular rotation of courses.

ENG 280 Women Go to the Movies, or How to Read a Film 3 credits

Images of women in film, from the 1930s “Golden Age” to the present. This course will focus on the ways in which films and their portrayals of women mirror their times, the ways in which film adaptations transform the original prose sources, the use of various techniques and conventions of film and prose, and archetypes as keys to “reading” both literature and film. Satisfaction of the WRI-1 requirement is not necessary prior to enrollment in this course.

ENG 303 Linguistics and the Development of the English Language 3 credits

The study of structural linguistics: phonemics, morphology, and syntax of basic descriptive linguistics, as well as a systematic study of the changes in sound and syntax from the beginning of English to the present, including etymological developments. The course also introduces semantics, bilingualism and American speech communities, gender differences, and language development in children.

ENG 306 Chaucer 3 credits

The study of “The Canterbury Tales” and “Troilus and Criseyde,” including the cultural history of 14th century England and major issues in Chaucerian scholarship. 

ENG 311 Shakespeare 3 credits

A study of Shakespeare’s major plays and other poetry. The course pays special attention to Shakespeare’s world, Renaissance England, and its influence on the playwright, as well as to our contemporary responses to Shakespeare’s insights about the human condition. Emphasis is placed on aspects of performance as well as close study of the language, structure, and thematics of his plays.

ENG 312 Medieval and Renaissance Literature 3 credits

Focused study of the literature of the Middle Ages and the longer English Renaissance, including the 17th century. The course may concentrate on a single author or group of authors, a specific genre, or a literary theme. Possible emphases include women in medieval literature, medieval romances, Arthurian literature of the Middle Ages, Jacobean drama (excluding Shakespeare), seventeenth-century poetry, and Renaissance women writers.

ENG 317  Restoration and Eighteenth-Century British Literature 3 credits

Focused study of the literature of the longer eighteenth century, from the Restoration to the French Revolution.  The course may concentrate on a single author or group of authors, a specific genre, or a literary theme.  Possible emphases include Jane Austen and eighteenth-century culture, Restoration and eighteenth-century drama, and the uses of satire in the period.  

ENG 318 Nineteenth-Century British Literature 3 credits

Focused study of the literature written in the period spanning the French Revolution through the reign of Queen Victoria, with occasional forays into the Edwardian era. The course may concentrate on a single author or group of authors, a specific genre, or a literary theme. Sample emphases may include Romantic women writers, rebellion in Romantic literature, the Brontës, work and desire in Victorian literature, Victorian Empire writing.

ENG 319 Modern and Contemporary British Literature 3 credits

Focused study of British literature written in the twentieth- and twenty-first centuries. The course may concentrate on a single author or group of authors, a specific genre, or a literary theme.

ENG 321 Romantic American Literature 3 credits

American literature from 1820 to 1865, including the birth of Romanticism, Transcendentalism, the slave narrative, and the abolitionist and woman’s suffrage movements.  Representative authors include Edgar Allan Poe, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Margaret Fuller, Herman Melville, Frederick Douglass, Harriet Jacobs, Harriet Beecher Stowe, Walt Whitman, and Emily Dickinson.  

ENG 322 Realist American Literature 3 credits

American literature from 1865 to 1914: an investigation of the ways in which mainstream and marginalized writers responded to post-Civil-War changes and conditions, including the literary movements of realism, naturalism, regionalism, and “local color.” Representative authors include Mark Twain, Louisa May Alcott, Henry James, Charles Chesnutt, Kate Chopin, Sarah Orne Jewett, Sui Sin Far, and Zitkala-Sa.

ENG 323 Modern American Literature 3 credits

Focuses on American literature of the modern period (1914-1945):  poetry and prose that range from the experimentalism of elitist art to immigrant stories to hardboiled detective fiction.  

ENG 326 Contemporary American Literature 3 credits

Focuses on developments in North American literature from the nineteen-fifties to the present. Includes not only established authors such as Morrison and Atwood but new voices as well.

ENG 333 Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction 3 credits

An advanced workshop for those who have successfully completed a lower-level fiction writing course and who wish additional practice. The class includes weekly reading and/or writing assignments.  Students complete a semester-long project – the creation of a portfolio of new works. Prerequisites: Satisfaction of the WRI- I requirement and one of the following: ENG 233 or permission of instructor.

ENG 334 Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry 3 credits

An advanced workshop for those who have successfully completed a lower level creative writing course in poetry and who wish additional practice. The class includes weekly reading and writing assignments. Students complete a semester-long project--the creation of a portfolio of new works. Permission of instructor is required to take this course. Prerequisites: Satisfaction of the WRI-1 requirement or HON 122 and ENG 234 or HON 194.

ENG 335 Advanced Nonfiction Writing 3 credits

An advanced workshop for those who have successfully completed a lower-level nonfiction writing course and who wish additional practice in writing the essay.  The class includes weekly reading and writing assignments.  Students complete a semester-long project—the creation of a portfolio of new works.  Prerequisites: Satisfaction of the WRI-1 requirement or HON 122 and one of the following: ENG 235 or permission of instructor.

ENG 345 Topics in World Literature 3 credits

World literature in English translation.  Course content varies from semester to semester.

ENG 352 English Seminar 3 credits

Semi-independent research and small-group discussion on a common literary concern. In addition, readings and discussion of professional and social issues related to the study of literature. On occasion, this course may be team-taught. Open to senior English majors and to junior English majors with instructor permission. Course may be repeated for credit with different topic.

ENG 360 Special Topics 3 credits

Highlights special topics that supplement the department’s regular rotation of courses.

ENG 370 Intern Program 3 credits

Two internship opportunities are offered: 1) Teaching assistant. Outstanding seniors assist in conducting upper-level English courses that they have had previously, while pursuing an advanced reading course in the subject. 2) Literary magazine editor. Each year, a student intern will be selected to oversee the publication of the college’s literary magazine. The editorial internship is usually held for academic year, though it may be held for more than one year in rare instances. Interns are selected by the department, approved by the department chair, and supervised either by the instructor of the course they are assisting with or by the advisor to the literary club and magazine. This course is offered at the discretion of the department.

ENG 380 Women Writers 3 credits

A study of the works of major British and American women authors and the nature of women’s creativity in the context of feminist criticism.

ENG 382 Literary Theory and Criticism 3 credits

A study of the ideas and theories that inform the study of literature, this course investigates the acts of reading, writing, and interpretation and the philosophical ideas that inform them. Students will study schools of theory and criticism to gain a keener awareness of the ways in which they already interpret words and the world and practice new ways of determining meaning.

ENG 390 Independent Study 1-3 credits each term

Encompasses individual reading, creative or research projects carried out under the supervision of a member of the department. Departmental approval is required to take this course.

 

ENGLISH-AS-A-SECOND-LANGUAGE (ESL) COURSES

ESL 101 Listening and Speaking Skills 3 credits

Advances the oral communication skills necessary for non-native speakers to succeed at the college level. Special attention is given to clear expression of ideas, conversations and discussions, understanding classroom lectures and cultural proprieties and expectations. In addition, American English pronunciation for clear communication is refined and practiced.

ESL 102 Academic Writing 3 credits

Addresses the discourse of academic writing appropriate at an American college. Topics covered in this course include the process of writing, paragraph development and organization, thesis development, various composition types, clear expression of ideas and overall essay coherence. In addition, form, meaning and usage of American English structure and syntax are reviewed.

ESL 160 Special Topics 1-3 credits

One or more special topics courses are offered each semester. The topics include but are not limited to the following: Academic Reading Skills and Vocabulary Development, Advanced Pronunciation of American English, Note-Taking Skills for Lectures and Discussions and American English Grammar Review.

 

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE COURSES

ENS 101 3 credits

Designed for non-science majors who seek to develop sufficient knowledge and vocabulary to fully understand the current environmental issues. This course presents a balanced, multi-disciplined approach to understanding environmental issues and focuses on how chemical principles impact the ethical, political, and economic implications of these issues.

 

ETHICS COURSES

ETL 235: The Ethical Life: Moral and Social Responsibility 3 credits

A sophomore level course providing students with the opportunity to study the major theories of ethics and social justice and explore their own values and beliefs, in context of an individual’s responsibility to the community.  Designed to enhance the process of learning and self-exploration by enabling the students to put into immediate practice the ideas they discuss in the classroom. Composed of two interdependent elements: a once a week class that meets for one hour to discuss the theories of ethics, community and social justice and a 28-hour community partnership placement where students provide a needed service that benefits the community directly.

 

FINE ARTS COURSES

FNA 100  First Friday 1 credit

Required for graduation with any performing arts major, all Performing Arts majors must complete no less than four semesters of attendance and participation in First Friday which meets at noon for one hour the First Friday of each month from September to December and February to May. Students must begin attending First Friday once they have declared their major. Students must attend all First Friday sessions and present a work in progress at least once at year at a First Friday. In addition, students are expected to participate in an on-line e-college discussion group on selected topics related to the performing arts.

FNA 103 Introduction to the Fine Arts: One’s Search for Expression 3 credits

Offers a cross-cultural examination of human creative works, expressed in the fine arts through selected historic periods to the present.

FNA 252 Senior Seminar 3 credits

A seminar in contemporary art, dance music and theatre and is required of all performing arts majors.

FNA 255  Portfolio Preparation 1 credit

Designed for junior and senior performing arts majors to assemble and organize production material into a professional, presentational format.  Students will create professional quality cover letters, resumes and portfolios based on performing arts standards.

FNA 260 Special Topics 1-3 credits

FNA 353 Senior Project 3 credits

This course consists of maintaining a journal and attending weekly sessions. Students also complete a final senior project. A project prospectus, complete with budget, timetable and project focus, must be submitted in writing to all members of the department for approval. Proposals for all projects are due by May 1 of the previous academic year. Once approved, the student completes a project that demonstrates her expertise in one or more aspects of the performing or fine arts. The project is graded by a committee of faculty from the department.

 

FORENSIC SCIENCE COURSES

FSC 101 Forensic Science in Criminal Investigations 4 credits

The role of Forensic Science continues to grow in criminal investigations. As this dynamic continues to change, it becomes increasingly important for investigators to fully understand and appreciate the strengths and weaknesses of physical evidence. This science for non-science majors course will provide students with an overview of what happens from the crime scene to the laboratory, and then finally in the court room. Through lecture and hands-on exercises in the laboratory students will develop a fundamental appreciation for Biology, Chemistry, and Physics and how Forensic Science applies these natural sciences to address legal issues.

 

FRENCH COURSES

FRE 101 Introduction to French I        3 credits

Offers students the essentials of French grammar with emphasis on all language skills: listening, reading, writing, speaking, and the facets of French culture.

FRE 102 Introduction to French II       3 credits

A continuation of French 101. Prerequisite is either French 101 or its equivalent (see instructor for details).

 

GENDER STUDIES COURSES

GND 100 Introduction to Gender Studies 3 credits

Focuses on the experiences of women, the significance of gender in society, and interdisciplinary approaches to the study of gender. The course investigates 1) the social construction of gender, and 2) the interdependent relationships of gender, race, ethnicity, class, sexual identities, age, and physical ability. Particular attention is paid to the role of gender in the media and popular culture.

GND 222  Race and Gender in the Media   3 credits

As consumers and producers of media, it is important that communication majors and non-communication majors critically examine the role of media in forming our beliefs about race, ethnicity, and gender in society.  Media have the ability to shape, challenge, and uphold our beliefs about others and ourselves.  Through this course, students will explore the social construction of race and gender through readings, discussion, and research.  Specifically, the class will focus on critically viewing race and gender in film, television, and print media.  Cross-listed as CST 222.

GND 260/360 Special Topics in Gender Studies 1-3 credits

Highlights special topics that supplement regular offerings for the gender studies minor. Frequently cross-listed as offering in another academic discipline, this course may fulfill one or more theme categories.

GND 350 Research in Gender Studies 1 credit

Students roster this course along with their capstone experience in their major or their Honors senior project. They work with a gender studies faculty member to explore gender theory appropriate to their project in their major and to produce a researched product that dovetails with their capstone work and that focuses on gender issues.

 

GENERAL SCIENCE COURSES

GSC 101 Physical Geology 4 credits

A study of the Earth’s dynamic tectonic and hydrologic systems, seismicity, volcanism, crustal deformation, rivers, glaciers and erosion. Also covered are the origin, classification and properties of rocks and minerals. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours, including field trip.

GSC 103 Astronomy 4 credits

A study of what is known about our place in the observable universe. The sun and the solar system, the nature of stars, stellar life cycles, galaxies and the structure of the universe are discussed. Information concerning how to view the heavens, phases of the moon, eclipses, etc. as amateur astronomers do each night is also covered. Laboratories consist of observations through a telescope, using a planisphere, comparative planetology, the Messier list, constellations, extra solar planets, and life on other worlds. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.

GSC 104 Historical Geology 3 credits

A study of the evolution of the earth’s environment including changes in the land, seas and mountains; and the succession of life, including human, through time. Lecture three hours, including field trip.

GSC 105 A Guide to Earth’s Energy Resources: Wise Use and Future Prospects
3 credits

Energy is a fundamental physical concept and plays an increasingly important role in society. This course will focus on describing what energy is and how the various forms of energy interrelate and can be converted to other forms. The properties of energy sources in current use will be examined with respect to supply and environmental impact. The entire range of alternative sources of energy will be discussed and critically examined, with a view towards determining the practicality of increasing societal use of one or more of them. Lecture three hours.

GSC 106 Weather and Climate 4 credits

A study of the atmosphere and oceans and their role in the Earth's life-supporting environment; solar radiation and the energy transfers between air, land and sea; elements of weather and climate; atmospheric and ocean pollution, especially as they relate to climate change; chemical and physical oceanography. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.

GSC 110 Geology of the National Parks 3 credits

Encompassing over 84 million acres, America’s National Park System preserves some of our most cherished natural, cultural and historic places.  While the general public may see them primarily as recreational spaces, many parks also serve as focal points for studying a variety of classic and unique geologic settings, as well as their associated ecosystems.  Students will explore the history of the park system from its initial inception to the present, and analyze and interpret data from scientific research conducted within park boundaries.

GSC 351 General Science Seminar 3 credits

Student self-conducted research on a selected topic of interest, finalized with a submitted paper and formal presentation with critique. The use of modern information retrieval techniques is emphasized.

GLOBAL STUDIES COURSES 

GST 100  3 credits

What’s different about the modern world system? How have modern institutions, cultures, and people changed since 1950? This course begins with a brief survey of the history of globalization and how the contemporary world is different from earlier times. The heart of the course is an examination of how the world has become inter-connected, along with an analysis of the agents involved in the process. This course is required for the major.

GST 360 (Capstone)  3 credits

This course is taken in the senior year as the capstone of the major. Students may do a thesis or special project under the supervision of an advisor from the student’s concentration area. This course is required for the major.

HEALTH COURSES

HLT 100 Biology and Healthy Aging 3 credits

This course focuses on the physical changes of aging and the relationship of health promoting behaviors to positive aging processes.  The course provides an overview of the impact of the normal aging process on the human body and health conditions associated with aging.  Health concepts and lifestyle changes that impact the aging process are explored.  Wellness and health promotion strategies for the elderly are reviewed as keys to healthy aging.

 

HISTORY COURSES

HIS 107 and 108 European Civilization: Ideas and Experiences 3 credits (each term)

An introduction to the historical and cultural legacy of western civilization through the study of a series of exemplary works, from classical antiquity to the present. Several critically important works of philosophy, history and literature are studied in the context of the cultural epochs which produced them and whose essential character they express or embody.

HIS 121 and 122 Survey of United States History 3 credits each term

A study of American history from the first Afro-European contact with North America to the present. The principal focus of the course is political, economic and social, but attention is also paid to architecture, literature, and popular culture where appropriate. Students are encouraged to explore these areas in their independent research.

HIS 210 Liberal Democracy and Capitalism 3 credits

A study of the development of liberal and democratic systems of government and free market economies from the end of the 18th century to the present. The political revolutions in America and France are studied, as is the emergence of industrial capitalism in England and America. Substantial attention is given to the philosophic principles that support liberal democracy and private enterprise, including those articulated by the writers of the Enlightenment, by the English classical economists, and by such 19th-century thinkers as Alexis de Tocqueville and John Stuart Mill. The course concludes with a consideration of the thesis that “history has ended,” i.e., that liberal democracy and capitalism have triumphed and face no further fundamental challenges. This last consideration acquires particular urgency in the light of September 11th, 2001, and the conflicts that have followed.

HIS 211 Twentieth Century Dictatorships 3 credits

A study of the causes, character, and consequences of dictatorial rule in the twentieth century, this course uses Fascist Italy, Nazi Germany, Soviet Russia, and Communist China as the major examples. Both the similarities that link these dictatorships and the differences that separate them are studied in detail. Particular attention is paid to the ideas on which dictatorial rule has been based, including those of Marx

Nietzsche, Sorel and Lenin. The course examines the popular appeal of revolutionary and counterrevolutionary ideologies as alternatives to parliamentary democracy and the social and economic programs these regimes put into practice. Propaganda, coercion, and forms of resistance are also considered.

HIS/ART 215 Selected Movements in Art and Architecture 1750-1900 3 credits

A study of the major artistic styles of the late 18th and 19th centuries, a period characterized by revolution and the birth of the modern era. Topics include neoclassisism, romanticism, realism, impressionism, the academic style and symbolism. These movements are studied against a background of dramatic political and social change and in the context of a continually evolving market for artistic production. Careful analysis of individual works, together with readings from primary source material, structure this investigation.

HIS 218 The City as History 3 credits (cross-listed as Honors 218)

An examination of several European capitals as built environments and as public stages for the enactment of a variety of social and cultural roles. The design of urban space through art, architecture and engineering is studied, as is the reflection of changes in urban life that can be found in literature, criticism and film. Historical events, as they were witnessed and experienced in these cities, provide continuity and context for explorations in art and culture. Cities studied include Rome, Paris, London, Vienna, Budapest, and Berlin. For non-Honors students, permission of instructor required.

HIS/HON 220 Film and History: Visions and Revisions of the Past 3 credits

From “Schindler’s List” to “Valkyrie,” historically based films have been attracting big box office receipts. This course introduces students to the historical fiction film as a work of creative art and to the techniques filmmakers use to construct their “vision” of past events. Through critical analysis of several dramatic films that take historical events as their subjects, students learn that what they see on screen is not necessarily what happened, but rather what might have happened. Films studied include “The Leopard,” “Burnt by the Sun,” “Rosenstrasse,” “1900,”and “Sunshine.” For non-Honors students, permission of instructor required.

HIS 221 The American Revolution and the Early Republic 3 credits

An examination of the American struggle for independence, the ratification of the Constitution, and the early years of the Republic. Particular attention is paid to the transformation of American cultural, economic, and political institutions during this period. The rising power of the Supreme Court is treated in detail.

HIS 223 The Civil War and Reconstruction 3 credits

An examination of the events that led to the American Civil War. Particular attention is devoted to slavery. In addition, the political, economic, military, and cultural implications of the Civil War, as well as its aftermath during Reconstruction, are treated in detail.

HIS 224 America as a World Power 3 credits

An examination of the rise of the United States as a world power in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the growth of American interest in East Asia and the Caribbean region, the American participation in World War I and World War II, and the U. S. role as a super power in the Cold War and post Cold War eras. The course also explores how certain domestic events – the Red Scare, the Great Depression, and the civil rights movement – influenced or were influenced by America’s role in international affairs.

HIS 230 The American South since the Civil War 3 credits

An examination of the South from the end of the Civil War to the present. Special attention is devoted to the social, economic, political, and artistic contours of the Southern past. Topics include the Ku Klux Klan, the Populists, the demagogues, the Southern literary renaissance, the modern civil rights movement, and the rise of the so-called New South.

HIS 231 American Cultural Traditions 3 credits

An examination of the cultural lives of ordinary Americans from the colonial period to the present. In particular, the course will look at the evolution of popular painting and illustration, and the transformation of American domestic architecture from the post-Medieval house to the rancher. In addition, the course will study such literary forms as the dime novel and the mass market magazine; stage entertainment like burlesque, vaudeville, and minstrelsy; and the advent and evolution of radio and television.

HIS 232 The African-American Freedom Struggle 3 credits

An examination of the history of the African-American struggle for freedom, equality, identity, and economic success. Particular attention is paid to the Jim Crow and post-World War II eras. The work of such leaders as Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. Du Bois, Martin Luther King, and Malcolm X is studied in detail. In addition, the course explores the activities the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the Black Panthers, and the Nation of Islam. The Harlem  Renaissance and the development of blues and jazz are also studied. Finally, the course looks at the African-American freedom struggle in an international context, comparing and contrasting it with similar movements in Africa and elsewhere.

HIS 250 Germany and the Path to the European Union 3 credits

Provides students with a critical understanding of German history from the middle of the 19th century to the present and of Germany’s impact on the European Continent. A central focus is whether or not Germany’s historical development followed a divergent path from that of England, France and America and, if so, for what reasons and with what consequences. Since the Cold War and with reunification, Germany’s efforts to fashion a new leadership role in Europe and in other international political and economic contexts are examined. Substantial attention is directed to problems of history, memory and responsibility that continue to occupy Germans today.

HIS 251 Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia 3 credits

An exploration of the historical development of Russia and the Soviet Union from the eve of the 1917 Revolution to the present. Students are encouraged to study the Russian Empire and the Soviet Union as global powers, well before the more familiar role the USSR played as America’s principal adversary during the Cold War. With post-Soviet Russia seeking to define its place in world affairs, students will learn how this task is complicated by the enormous historical deficits accumulated through the years of Communist rule. Students have opportunities to research subjects of special interest, including the use of comparative perspectives on politics, economics, social relations, and culture.

HIS 260 Special Topics 1-3 credits

HIS 270 China and Japan in the Modern Age 3 credits

A comparative look at the political, social, and cultural histories of modern China and Japan, this course begins with the first Opium War (1839 to 1842) and continues to the present.

HIS 278 Terror: The History of an Idea 3 credits

This course seeks to provide a historical, sociological, and cultural context to the phenomenon of terrorism as it is understood in today’s world. The course will explore the different meanings, over the last two or three centuries, that the words “terror,” “terrorism,” and “terrorist” have all carried. Students will explore the historical origins of terror as an idea or ideology, the different forms terrorism has taken, and representations of terrorists in literature, social thought, art, and film. This course does not provide a comprehensive history of terrorism. It does provide a historical and cultural context that may help us to understand what terrorism is, who terrorists are, and why the idea of terror dominates contemporary politics.

HIS 350 Research Seminar (CAP) 3 credits

Advanced study of the important research techniques used by historians. In addition, it requires students to employ such techniques to develop, pursue and complete a lengthy research paper (based, in part, on the substantial use of primary sources) appropriate to their program and interests. Particular attention is paid to the use of indices, databases and on-line services; the pursuit and critical evaluation of evidence; and a mastery of the essay form of scholarly writing. With its emphasis on logical thinking, quantitative analysis, clear writing, and other college-wide goals, this class serves as the history major’s capstone experience.

HIS 390 Independent Study 1-3 credits

 

HONORS COURSES

HON 100 Freshman Seminar 3 credits

An interdisciplinary seminar designed for entering freshmen as an initial college experience. The seminar’s topic is issue-oriented, international in scope, and academically explored across various disciplines of the College. Skills in reading, writing, and oral presentation are stressed, as are different learning styles necessary for a successful college experience.

HON 133 Changing the World from the Inside Out 3 credits

An introduction to holistic approaches to various global problems. As social change agents, students are challenged to translate their self-awareness into envisioning, formulating and analyzing creative, practical approaches to shaping the world to best meet human needs in the new millennium.

HON 194 Creative Writing 3 credits

A workshop offering practice in writing poetry and fiction. Students will participate in peer-critiquing sessions and discussions of established authors’ works. Each student will produce a portfolio of written work. Prerequisite: HON 122 or permission of the instructor.

HON 200 The Quest

This course traces the evolution of Arthurian legend from its origin to the present. Students will analyze the various forms the legend has taken to discover its changing meanings within different historical periods. The course covers both literature and film, including "Monty Python and the Holy Grail."

HON 202 Asian Religions 3 credits

An in-depth examination of Hinduism and Buddhism in south, southeast and East Asia. The course examines the origins of these classical religions of India as well as the smaller, more regionalized faiths in the Indian subcontinent: Jainism and Sikhism. Students participate in a number of field experiences to study the adaptation of the faiths to the United States.

HON 206: Webs and Virtual Spaces: Victorian Lit and Hyperlit 3 credits

Have you ever wondered whether you think or read differently, depending upon whether you grew up on books or the Internet?  In this course, we’ll consider what's different about a story told on the page versus on a computer screen, with possibilities for multimedia interactions.  To help us answer this question we begin with a consideration of fairy tales and their many variations, then move to an examination of 19th-century fiction and contemporary hypertext “re-visions.”  Along the way, you’ll have the chance to craft your own hypertext fairy tale and collaborate on a group hypertext project.

HON 212  Case Studies in the Forensic Sciences: The Application of Science and Technology to the Investigation of Crime 3 credits

This course is designed to teach the student how science and technology are used in the investigation of crime through the examination of case studies that utilized science and technology in their adjudication.  The cases presented will illustrate the use of forensic evidence from a variety of disciplines (for instance, pathology, anthropology, and chemical and biological based evidence) and each student is expected to lead a group discussion on one particular case.  No science background is required to take this course.

HON/BIO 214 Bioterrorism & Emerging Infectious Diseases 3 credits

Ebola, anthrax, Lyme disease, SARS, polio, smallpox, the Plague, mad cow disease and West Nile virus continue to attract the attention of the human species. These are either emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) or the agents responsible for the diseases that plague our kind. In some cases, EIDs and bioterrorism go hand in hand. This course will cover the biological mechanisms of a diversity of diseases, the ecology of disease agents and vectors, the impact of globalization on the spread of EIDs, agencies (e.g., CDC) involved in fighting the spread of diseases, bioterrorism in the past, present and future, and the socioeconomic impact of EIDs and bioterrorism. Lectures, debates, book discussions, films, and projects will be integral parts of this course. Prerequisites: Either BIO 112, BIO 118, BIO 122 or permission of the instructor.

HON/HIS 218  The City as History 3 credits

Examines several European cities as built environments and as public stages for the enactment of a variety of social and cultural roles. The design of urban space through art, architecture and engineering is studied, as is the reflection of changes in urban life that can be found in literature, criticism and film. Historical events, as they were witnessed and experienced in these cities, provide continuity and context for explorations in art and culture. Cities studied include Rome, Paris, London, Vienna, Budapest, and Berlin.

HON/HIS 220 Film and History: Visions and Revisions of the Past 3 credits

From “Schindler’s List” to “Valkyrie,” historically based films have been attracting big box office dollars in the last several years. This course introduces students to the historical fiction film as a creative work and to the techniques filmmakers use to construct their “vision” of past events. Through critical analysis of several dramatic films that take historical events as their subjects, students learn that what they see on the screen is not necessarily what happened, but rather what might have happened. Films include “The Leopard,” “1900,” “Burnt by the Sun,” “Rosenstrasse,” and “Sunshine.”

HON/PSY 224 Women in the Workplace         3 credits

Examines the theory, research and practice of various issues involving women in the workplace. Topics include the history of women at work, non-traditional occupations and roles, gender differences in communication, leadership, and work styles, management and associated psychological paradigms, relevant legal and political issues, work-life dilemmas, and personal planning and growth strategies. Active participation is required. For Honors credit, permission of instructor required.

HON/PSY 231 Social Psychology for Psychology 3 credits

This course will examine theoretical perspectives as well as laboratory and field research demonstrating the importance of situational influences on behavior. Topics include: self-concept and presentation of self, attitude formation and persuasion, conformity and obedience, as well as factors influencing interpersonal attraction, interpersonal aggression, and pro-social behavior. Offered alternate years.

HON 244 Psychology and Dramatic Literature 3 credits

Since the time of Aristotle, drama and psychology have been inseparably linked. Plot, character and dialogue are all shaped by the workings of the mind and the psyche. The emergence of psychotherapy in the 20th century has led playwrights to focus on behavior and create unique and fascinating characters. This course exposes students to several important works of 19th and 20th century drama, in a discussion-style format. Using major psychological theories, students are able to develop their own interpretations of stage characters and the motivations for their actions.

HON 245 Topics in Popular Culture

This course invites students to explore the phenomena of and to apply the skills of critical analysis to modern popular culture forms such as music, film, television, advertising, sports, fashion, toys, magazines and comic books, and cyberculture. Selected semesters only.

HON/PSY 251 Health Psychology 3 credits

Health Psychology is a rapidly growing field within the discipline of psychology. It is devoted to understanding psychological factors that affect health and disease. Health Psychology emphasizes health promotion while at the same time explores how traditional medical interventions may be fortified through the application of behavioral and psychological principles. The past decade has witnessed a significant increase in employment opportunity for health psychologists, especially in clinical and academic settings. For Honors credit, permission of instructor required.

HON 260 Special Topics 3 credits

Offers subjects of special interest to students.

HON/HIS 278 Terror: The History of an Idea 3 credits

This course seeks to provide a historical, sociological, and cultural context to the phenomenon of terrorism as it is understood in today’s world.  The course will explore the different meanings, over the last two or three centuries, that the words “terror,” “terrorism,” and “terrorist” have all carried.  Students will explore the historical origins of terror as an idea or ideology, the different forms terrorism has taken, and representations of terrorists in literature, social thought, art, and film. This course does not provide a comprehensive history of terrorism. It does provide a historical and cultural context that may help us to understand what terrorism is, who terrorists are, and why the idea of terror dominates contemporary politics.

HON/PSC 300 Law and Counterterrorism 3 credits

An analysis of the due process rights guaranteed by the Bill of Rights as viewed from the perspective of U.S. counterterrorism laws and policies. Primary attention is devoted to an analysis of the Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Amendments as these due process rights relate to the federal government’s ability to gather intelligence pertaining to international terrorism, investigate individuals suspected of involvement in terrorist activities and prosecute individuals charged with the commission or facilitation of terrorist acts in the United States.

HON 350 and 351 Honors Thesis/Project 3 credits each term

The culmination of a student’s work in the honors program is a senior-year two-semester, six-credit thesis/project under the supervision of a mentor who is expert in the field of inquiry (in most instances, a faculty member). This thesis/project is completed in April of the senior year, and can take the form of a scholarly work, a creative project or a combination of the two. The thesis/project must have a cross-disciplinary dimension. If the student chooses, it may be an extended version of a senior thesis or creative project completed to satisfy the capstone requirement in the student’s major field.

HON 390 Independent Study               1-3 credits

 

ITALIAN COURSES

ITL 101 Introduction to Italian I           3 credits

Covers the essentials of Italian language and culture, with an emphasis on learning to speak and to understand practical, conversational Italian. The course is offered in alternate years.

ITL 102 Introduction to Italian II          3 credits

A continuation of Italian 101. Prerequisite: Italian 101 or the equivalent.

 

LIVING LEARNING COMMUNITIES

LLC 200 Social Justice: A Global Perspective  3 credits

This course is offered to students in the Social Justice Living Learning Community.  The course teaches global awareness of human rights violations and a basic understanding of programs and resources existing to combat human suffering. Globalization offers areas for social action and social transformation. Students taking this course will be able to recognize the opportunities for positive change in an increasingly interconnected world. When students recognize their own interdependence with other countries of the world, they become more respectful of people of other cultures and nations of origin. Students will be challenged to transcend parochialism, and gain a new understanding of global inequalities. Topics that will be examined are: HIV/AIDS pandemic, human trafficking, genocide in Darfur, feminization of poverty and violence, war refugees, child soldiers and post-apartheid South Africa. Students will explore existing resources for change such as: The World Health Organization, International AIDS Trust, Peace and Society, Amnesty International, United Nations High Commission on Human Rights, Save the Children, World Visions, Million Voices for Darfur, Doctors Without Boarders, Grameen Bank, World Revolution, UNICEF, Third World Network, International Labour Organization, Women’s Human Rights Network, Global Policy Reform and Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development.

LLC 201 Social Justice Seminar  3 credits

Social Justice Seminar is a three-credit service-learning course taken by students in the Social Justice Living Learning Community.  The course is the second part of a two-course sequence that addresses social justice from a global perspective.  The course is composed of two distinct yet independent elements.  Students will spend the equivalent of two hours per week (28 hours over the course of the semester) in a service-learning experience.  One hour a week will be devoted to class discussions on readings, service-learning experiences and how human rights are protected in the community.  Students will study the major theories of ethics and social justice from a Western perspective and at the same time explore their own values and beliefs related to being an engaged citizen. Prerequisite: LLC 200

LLC 202 Environmental Stewardship Seminar I  3 credits

The Environmental Stewardship Living Learning Community (LLC) will provide students with the opportunity to explore the concept of environmental stewardship: what is our relationship with and responsibilities towards nature? Environmental-justice will be considered as part of a broad concept of environmental stewardship. The LLC will also provide the opportunity for students to increase their awareness of local and global ecological environmental issues. Students will be empowered by leadership opportunities to develop the skills and techniques to address environmental and environment-justice issues in their local community and the global community. Course work on ethical theory and environmental justice will be required of all students in the LLC. This course is the first course in a two-course sequence and will focus on environmental ethics. Each year a specific environmental issue will be studied in depth. Field trips during the semester are required.

LLC 203 Environmental Stewardship Seminar II  3 credits

The Environmental Stewardship Living Learning Community (LLC) will provide students with the opportunity to explore the concept of environmental stewardship: what is our relationship with and responsibilities towards nature? Environmental justice will be considered as part of a broad concept of environmental stewardship. This course is the second course in a two-course sequence and will focus on ethical theory and the concept of environmental justice. Students will explore their own values and beliefs in context environmental justice and will provide a needed service that directly benefits the local or global community. This course will include weekly meetings to discuss the theories of ethics and environmental justice and a 28-hour service-learning experience that will allow the application of ethical theory to an environmental justice issue. Prereqisite: LLC 202

 

MARKETING COURSES

MGT 230  Principles of Marketing    3 credits

Merges activities used to market a product or service into a logical framework. Students learn about building relationships with customers according to the customer’s needs. Skills developed and used are segmenting the market, defining buyer behavior, positioning a product to satisfy customer needs, and developing a strategy for the product, price, and marketing communication. Areas of focus include modern distribution systems such as direct marketing, tele-marketing, and Ecommerce via the Internet. Prerequisites:  BUA 110 (required for department majors), or CST 170, or PSY 100.

MRK 240 AppliedPublic Relations     3 credits

Applied Public Relations will introduce the student to the PR function within an organization and give them a solid understanding of PR as a process and its place in a company’s overall marketing mix.  The student will learn how to identify PR opportunities; conduct the appropriate research; identify audiences and media; plan and create a PR campaign; work with the media; and evaluate a campaign’s results.  Prerequisites:  MRK 230.

MRK 250 Consumer Behavior          3 credits

This course gives students a fundamental understanding of the human psychological core encompassing the topics of motivation, ability, and opportunity; exposure attention and perception; knowledge and understanding; attitudes; and memory.  It further surveys the consumer culture to include regional, ethnic and religious influences; social class; age, gender and social influences; and values, personality and lifestyle.  The knowledge of the psychological core and consumer culture are then employed to study the process of consumer decision making and applying these principles to business and marketing situations.  Prerequisites:  MRK 230, PSY 100.

MRK 290 Marketing Practicum 1 credit

A 1-credit interdisciplinary approach highlighting the importance of integrating education with experience. The student will develop an understanding of marketing and marketing strategy. Marketing Practicum will enhance critical thinking and leadership skills, creative abilities, social awareness and technological literacy. The course puts the student in the shoes of the marketing manager or consultant, thereby allowing broad, objective thinking. The student will clearly see the outcome of her effort. In addition, the student will benefit by having a portfolio piece and rich experience to present to future employers.  Prerequisites:  MRK 230 and permission from the instructor.

MRK 320 Marketing Research          3 credits

This course is an introduction to marketing research and explores the theory and technique used in both qualitative and quantitative market research.  The qualitative portion of the course will delve into consumer observation techniques, field experimentation, interviewing and focus groups, while the quantitative portion will cover survey design, sampling methods and theory, and data analysis.  Both sections will include “real-world” examples of planning and implementation, along with an emphasis on effective reporting.  Prerequisites:  MRK 230, MAT 110.

MRK 330 Branding 3 credits

Considers brands – why they are important, what they represent to consumers, and what should be done by firms to manage them properly. Although products and services can be duplicated, strongly held beliefs and attitudes established in the minds of buyers cannot be so easily reproduced. Emphasis is placed on how a brand is created, measured, and used to expand opportunities. Prerequisites: MRK 230.

MRK 331 Service Marketing 3 credits

Considers the marketing of intangible products and the use of intangibles in the marketing of tangible products. It explores the dimensions of successful service firms. It prepares students for enlightened management and suggests creative entrepreneurial opportunities. Outstanding service organizations are managed differently than their “merely good” competitors. Actions are based on totally different assumptions about the way success is achieved. The results show not only in terms of conventional measures of performance but also in the enthusiasm of the employees and quality of customer satisfaction. Beginning with the service encounter, service managers must blend marketing, technology, people, and information to achieve a distinctive competitive advantage. Prerequisites: MRK 230

MRK 332 Sales Management 3 credits

This course will provide an understanding of how selling is critical to the success of a marketing program. The student will gain knowledge of the sales process, the relationship between sales and marketing, sales force structure, customer relationship management (CRM), and issues in recruiting, selecting, training, motivating, compensating, and retaining salespeople.  The course will include lecture, cases studies, and “real-world” examples to ensure a well rounded learning experience. Prerequisites: MRK 230.

MRK 334 Applied Advertising           3 credits

Designed to give the student a broad understanding of advertising and promotion principles in today’s business climate, this course emphasizes the planning, implementation and control of various advertising and promotional principles. Its primary focus is directed towards the marketing manager with a specific process to utilize in developing effective communication programs. Specific topics include media strategy, target markets, creation of advertising and promotional programs, and the use of different types of media. Prerequisite: MRK 230.

MRK 335 B-to-B Marketing 3 credits

This course provides a practical foundation for successful business marketers. By addressing real issues that face business-to-business (B2B) and industrial marketers as well as the newest developments and insights into this rapidly changing field.  The course will focus on analysis of the B2B marketing environment, marketing techniques and tactics, and planning and implementation.  Prerequisites: MRK 230.

MRK 336 Global Marketing 3 credits

Examines the challenge of entering and operating effectively in foreign markets. Decisions are considered regarding international marketing objectives, strategies and policies, foreign market selection, adaptation of products, distribution channels of communications to fit each foreign market, and systems of international marketing organization, information gathering, planning and control. These topics, along with exploration of cultural issues, are examined through reading, case discussion, class presentations and a term project. Marketing reports for major countries will be prepared to offer valuable insights, as well as tips and techniques for marketing products and services in a specific country. Prerequisites: MRK 230.

MRK 352 Applied Marketing Management 3 credits

The students will work in teams to create an integrated marketing plan for a real or fictitious company.  The lecture will concentrate on the elements of marketing strategy and planning, and guest speakers will frequently address the class in order to offer a “real-world” perspective on these elements.  Each team will be assigned to a “Board of Advisors” consisting of 2-3 marketing professionals from the local business community and one faculty member (not the instructor).  The Board will act as advisors to the student teams during the creation of their plans, and will meet formally every 3-4 weeks.  The Board will also be evaluating the performance of the students as individuals and as a group.  The course will conclude with formal presentations of each group’s marketing plan.  Prerequisites:BUA 351, MRK 250, MRK 320, and ECO 101.

MRK 360 Special Topics 1-3 credits

This course is an exploration of specialized topics not among the traditional course offerings. This course may be repeated for credit as topics change.

 

MATHEMATICS COURSES

MAT 102 College Mathematics 3 credits

A nontechnical presentation of mathematical topics essential to the student of the arts, humanities or social sciences. The following are studied: elementary set theory, logic, number systems, probability and statistics and measurement and applications of mathematics to various disciplines. A scientific calculator is required. This course is appropriate for secondary education students (not math majors); some content is based on the Pre-Professional Skills Test in Mathematics (PRAXIS).

MAT 105 Mathematics for Business    3 credits

Designed to meet the needs of the student pursuing a career in business. The course includes the following topics: linear equations and inequalities, systems of equations, matrices, simple and compound interest, annuities, amortization and an introduction to calculus. A scientific calculator is required. Prerequisite: Skill equivalent to Algebra II at the secondary level.

MAT 107 Mathematics for Health Care Professionals 3 credits

An exploration of a wide range of mathematical applications to nursing and other health sciences. Topics include ratio and proportion, dimensional analysis, systems of measurement, calculations involving solutions and dilutions, medication and dosages. Medical applications in other areas of mathematics will also be explored; these may include set theory, arithmetic and geometric sequences, graphing, functions and formulas, exponential growth, logic and analogies, angle measurement applications, and mathematical analysis in medical journal publications. Critical thinking skills for solving problems that arise in the health care professions will be emphasized. While there is no prerequisite, a working knowledge of arithmetic operations using whole numbers, fractions, decimals, and percents is expected.

MAT 110 Probability and Statistics 3 credits

An examination of the collection, organization, analysis and interpretation of data in the context of applications from such fields as business, education, political science, economics, psychology, sociology, nutrition and medicine. The importance of experimental design and sampling techniques are studied and stressed throughout the course. Elementary probability theory is introduced as well as the following theoretical distributions: binomial, normal, Student’s t, and chi-square. Linear regression techniques and correlation analysis are used to study bivariate populations. An algebra background is required as well as a scientific or statistical calculator. This course does not count for the mathematics major or minor.

MAT 140 Pre-Calculus 3 credits

A basic algebra review of exponents, complex fractions, factoring, linear and quadratic equations, and inequalities. Functions are examined in depth both from a definitional and graphical perspective. Exponential and logarithmic functions, their graphs, and applications are reviewed/introduced. Basic trigonometric functions and identities are covered as well as their applications. The course is designed as a preparation for calculus. A TI-83 or higher graphing calculator is required.

MAT 141 Calculus I 3 credits

Differential calculus: A brief review of precalculus topics, limits, continuity and the derivative with applications. A TI-83 or higher graphing calculator is required.

MAT 142 Calculus II 3 credits

Integral calculus: A study of the definite and indefinite integral with applications; inverse functions with emphasis on exponential and logarithmic functions and applications; antidifferentiation techniques; approximate integration; and improper integrals. A TI-83 or higher graphing calculator required. Prerequisite: MAT 141.

MAT 202 Mathematics for Elementary Education 3 credits

Provides elementary education majors with experiences in becoming independent problem solvers while providing a solid foundation for teaching early mathematics. Topics include set theory, systems of numeration, number theory, properties of whole numbers, rational numbers, and real numbers, estimation, beginning geometry and measurement. Collaborative learning, discovery and refinement of presentation skills are stressed through in-class experiences. Traditional mathematical content is covered in the context of developing student competence with respect to the abilities outlined in the five process standards found in Principles and Standards for School Mathematics (National Council of Teachers of Mathematics, 2000): problem solving, reasoning and proof, communication, connections and representation. A student must be a declared elementary education major or have permission of the instructor to take this course.

MAT 210 Mathematical Statistics and Probability 3 credits

A calculus based examination of the collection, organization, analysis and interpretation of data in the context of applications from such fields as business, education, political science, economics, psychology, sociology, nutrition and medicine. The importance of experimental design and sampling techniques are studied and stressed throughout the course. Elementary probability theory and combinatorics are introduced as well as the following theoretical distributions: binomial, normal, Student’s t, and chi-square. Linear regression techniques and analysis of variance are also discussed. A TI-83 calculator or higher is required. Prerequisite: MAT 142.

MAT 211 Calculus III 3 credits

Further applications of the integral are studied including parametric and polar coordinates; infinite sequences and series; and an introduction to three-dimensional analytic geometry and vectors. Prerequisite: MAT 142.

MAT 212 Calculus IV 3 credits

A study of partial derivatives and multiple integrals with applications. Vector calculus. Prerequisite: MAT 211.

MAT 224 Discrete Mathematics 3 credits

(Cross-listed as Computer Information Systems 224)

Provides work at the advanced level in number systems for computer arithmetic, sets and logic, combinatorics, probability, relations and functions and Boolean Algebra. Offered in alternate years. Prerequisites: MAT 142, CIS135.

MAT 311 Linear Algebra 3 credits

A study of Euclidean spaces, general linear spaces and inner product spaces. Topics include linear independence and dependence; bases and linear transformations; matrices and determinants with application to linear systems; change of basis; and representation of linear transformation and inner products. Prerequisite: MAT 142.

MAT 313 Differential Equations           3 credits

A study of differential equations. Topics included Fourier series and boundary value problems. Prerequisite: MAT 212. Offered in alternate years.

MAT 316 Modern Algebra 3 credits

An introduction to the basic concepts, including groups, rings and fields. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or permission of the instructor. Offered in alternate years.

MAT 321 Numerical Analysis                3 credits

Numerical methods in solving equations, interpolation and numerical differentiation, approximation of integrals, systems of linear equations, approximation by spline functions, Monte Carlo methods, simulation and error analysis are studied. Topics include programmed solutions and computer methods. Prerequisite: MAT 142, CIS 135.

MAT 324 Modern Geometry 3 credits

An introduction to some areas of geometry, including cross ratio, inversion, poles and polars, dissection theory, projective and non-Euclidean geometry. Prerequisite: MAT 142 or permission of the instructor.

Offered in alternate years.

MAT 335 Introduction to Topology       3 credits

A study of basic topological concepts: mapping, continuity, connectivity, compactness, separation axioms and metric spaces. Prerequisite: MAT 212.

MAT 338 Number Theory 3 credits

A study of divisibility, congruences, quadratic reciprocity, number-theoretic functions and elementary Diophantine equations. Prerequisite: Permission of the instructor.

MAT 339 Complex Variables 3 credits

Functions of a complex variable are studied. Topics include Laurent and Taylor series, residue theory, contour integration and conformal mapping. Prerequisite: MAT 212 or permission of the instructor.

MAT 350 Advanced Calculus I             3 credits

Topics covered include basic theorems of the field of real numbers, inequalities, sequential limits, function limits and the derivative. The student submits a comprehensive journal reflecting the material covered in this course. The journal should include the major definitions and theorems studied during the term with proofs of the theorems. Also included is all graded work from the course, solutions to assigned problems and interesting results discovered in outside readings or relevant computer work. Students are also required to conduct independent research on a level appropriate to a senior mathematics major and make an oral presentation on their topic. Prerequisite: MAT 212.

MAT 351 Advanced Calculus II              3 credits

A study of the Riemann integral, Laplace transforms, series of numbers and functions. Prerequisite: MAT 350.

MAT 260/360 Special Topics in Mathematics 1-3 credits

An opportunity for more advanced courses than the usual offerings in number theory, modern geometry, complex variables, real analysis, algebra, differential equations or topology, this course is given when student interest and faculty time permit. May be repeated for credit with a different topic.

MAT 390 Independent Study 1-3 credits

An individual study project, usually of one term’s duration, under the direction of one or more members of the department faculty. An outline of the proposed study plan must be submitted before the beginning of the term in which the work is to be done. Prerequisite: A sufficient background in college mathematics related to the proposal.

 

MUSIC COURSES

MUS 100 Fundamentals of Music       3 credits

A beginning class in music reading and sight singing. Emphasis is placed on rhythmic and melodic drills as well as the understanding of basic music materials.

MUS 101 Experiencing Music: An Introduction 3 credits

A study of the basics of listening to various periods and styles of music. Course content includes listening to both recording and live concerts emphasizing the elements needed to create the artistic product.

MUS 120 Historical Epochs in Music 3 credits

A rotating topics course focusing on major musical periods and their contributing composers and trends including Baroque, Romantic, Contemporary, Viennese Classical and Medieval/Renaissance. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.

MUS 130 Healing With Music 3 credits

Offered in an accelerated two weekend format, students will learn the history of the harp as a healing instrument and gain elementary skills playing an actual instrument. Harp rental fee required.

MUS 191 or 192 Applied Music    1 or 2 credits

Any student may take applied music courses. Two credits are offered for ten one-hour weekly lessons per  term, or one credit for ten half-hour weekly lessons per term. Students taking ten one-hour weekly lessons per term are expected to practice a minimum of eight hours per week while studying. Students taking ten half-hour weekly lessons are expected to practice a minimum of four hours per week while studying. Students may select from the offerings noted below.

Fees: All students taking Applied Music 191 or 192 are charged at the current day per credit rate for each credit taken. Additionally, students are charged a Private Lesson Fee for a 10-week term of private lessons. Please refer to the Academic Fees section for the current rates. Declared music majors and declared music minors will be assessed this fee for any lessons taken after their respective applied music requirements (16 hours for the major; eight hours for the minor) are met.

Piano: Performance, teaching techniques and styling are emphasized in the study of compositions of the Classic, Romantic and Modern composers. A thorough technical foundation is stressed.

Voice: Tone production, breath control and diction are taught in a course of study ranging from simple Italian and English songs to operatic arias, oratorio arias and recitatives and modern song repertoire. Prerequisites: Music 195 or permission of applied music coordinator.

Organ: Prerequisite to the study of organ is the ability to play fluently selections from Bach’s Two- Part Inventions or the equivalent. Hymn-playing and conducting from the organ stressed with a view to preparing the student for a church position.

Woodwinds and Brass: Chamber music ensembles will be developed when possible.

Violin and Viola: Development of playing skills with emphasis on accomplishment prerequisite to participation in chamber music and performance on the solo literature is covered.

Flute: Fundamental techniques are studied with the goal of development of sufficient skill to perform the solo literature and to participate in chamber music ensembles.

Classical and Folk Guitar: Fundamental methods of finger-style playing are studied with emphasis on position, tone and repertoire. Solo, duo and accompaniment techniques are included. The course of study ranges from simple folk tunes to the works of Bach, Villa-Lobos and Sor.

Percussion: Rudiments of percussion-playing are stressed, including classical and jazz styles.

MUS 193 Instrumental Ensemble 1 credit

Selected musical ensembles are formed each fall for flute and clarinet.

MUS 194 Ensemble: The Camerata Singers 1 credit

This community chorus is the vocal ensemble that performs major works for chorus and orchestra. It is an SATB mixed chorus and an audition is required. The group performs twice a year. Meets off campus.

MUS 196 Ensemble: All College Chorus 1 credit

This group performs twice a year. No audition is required.

MUS 198 Musical Theatre Workshop    1 credit

Once-a-week group instruction in musical voice training for the theatre with emphasis on the individual strengths of the singer, selection of appropriate music and preparing vocal selections for audition and performance. No audition is required.

MUS 199 Ensemble: Cedar Crest Singers 1 credit

This ensemble learns and performs in small performance groups. The group can perform both on and off campus. An audition is required. Commitment is for one year. Consult instructor for last day to drop.

MUS 210 Theory I 3 credits

The basic principles of tonal harmony and melodic structure are studied. The course includes written exercises, keyboard drills and analysis of tonal music. Emphasis is placed on aural perception of basic materials. Prerequisite: Music 100 and permission of instructor.

MUS 215 Theory II 3 credits

An analysis and aural perception of tonal music. Studies are made of 19th century chromaticism, modulation and the emergence of impressionism and atonality. Prerequisite: Music 210 and permission of the instructor.

MUS 216 Theory III: Style Analysis of the 20th Century 3 credits

Major compositional devices of the 20th century are studied. Coursework includes an analysis of representative works with regard to form, harmony, rhythm, contrapuntal devices and special sonorities and textures. Prerequisite: Music 215 and permission of the instructor.

MUS 221 Musical Styles 3 credits

This is a rotating topics course focusing on a specific musical style each term. Topics include jazz, opera, musical theatre, chamber music, piano literature and voice, symphonic music, electronic music and popular music. This course may be repeated for credit under different topics.

MUS 230 Great Composers 3 credits

This is a rotating topics course covering the works and lives of great composers including Beethoven, Mozart and Bach. The course examines the external influences of the era such as technological developments, social and cultural life and political circumstances on a specific composer each term. This course may be repeated under different topics.

MUS 260 Special Topics 1-3 credits

MUS 316 Conducting 2 credits

A study of the principles of choral-conducting; score-reading; the application of musicianship to conducting problems; and the conducting of recordings and live vocal ensembles. Prerequisite: Music 101 and permission of the instructor.

MUS 390 Independent Study             1-3 credits

Student-initiated study or special projects, including off-campus experience carried out under faculty supervision. Prerequisite: Junior standing and a declared major in music.

 

NEUROSCIENCE COURSES

NEU/BIO 200 Introduction to Neuroscience 3 credits

This introductory course covers many aspects of neuroscience including synaptic transmission, psychopharmacology, sensory systems, cognition, learning and basis of neurological disease. Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122 or PSY 100 or permission of the instructor.

NEU/PSY/BIO 220 Sensation and Perception (Alternate years) 3 or 4 credits

An in-depth study of sensory systems including vision, taste, olfaction, audition and somatic senses. Lab is required for Neuroscience majors. This course fulfills only the 3 credit SCI requirement. Prerequisite: PSY 100 or BIO 121.

NEU/BIO 330 Neuropharmacology (Alternate years) 3 credits

An in- depth study of the pharmacological aspects of neuroscience with an emphasis on clinical applications. Prerequisite: NEU 200.

NEU/BIO 340 Neuroscience Methods (Alternate years) 4 credits

This laboratory course introduces students to several of the methods currently used by neuroscientists including electrophysiological, histological and molecular techniques. The lecture component explores both classical and current literature in Neuroscience. Prerequisites: BIO 222 or 236, NEU 200 (NEU 200 can be taken concurrently).

NEU/BIO 348 Diseases of the Nervous System (Alternate years) 4 credits

Our brains control everything that makes us human, including how we think, feel, learn, and how we perceive the outside world. When the brain is damaged by disease or injury or fails to form correctly during development, the results can be catastrophic. This course will examine selected diseases of the nervous system at both the clinical and the molecular level and assess current treatments. Diseases to be discussed may include Alzheimer, schizophrenia, neural tube defects, autism, and spinal cord injuries. Readings from the primary literature and laboratory activities will complement the lecture material. Prerequisite: BIO 236, or permission of the instructor.

 

NUCLEAR MEDICINE CLINICAL COURSES

NMT 411 and 412 Nuclear Imaging and Instrumentation 6 credits each term

These courses offer an in-depth view of the clinical imaging and instrumentation commonly used in nuclear medicine.

NMT 413 and 414 Clinical Practicum 2 credits each term

These courses offer a practical experience observing and applying health-care principles in nuclear medicine. Students accept responsibility for a wide variety of procedures and must demonstrate competency in performance of these procedures.

NMT 415 Cross-sectional Anatomy 2 credits

Human anatomy in the transverse, longitudinal and coronal planes with application to nuclear medicine images.

NMT 421 Nuclear Physics and Radiation Safety 2 credits

A study of atomic and nuclear physics, radioactivity and properties of nuclear radiation. Included are pertinent radiation safety methodologies, federal and state regulations and internal dosimetry.

NMT 424 Applied Technical Mathematics/Statistics 1 credit

Derivation, manipulation and application of appropriate equations, including descriptive and inductive statistics and graphing are studied.

NMT 425 Patient Care 1 credit

Prepares students for practical experience in the clinical setting. Topics include medical terminology, patient-care procedures, resuscitation techniques, patient safety and body mechanics, sterile techniques and special-patient procedures. Hands-on experience under supervision is included.

NMT 426 Quality Assurance 1 credit

An introduction to concepts of quality and quality evaluation by reliable and reproducible methods.

NMT 428 Computers in Medical Imaging 1 credit

A review of basic computer science concepts and application of computer technology to generation and processing medical images.

NMT 430 Radiopharmaceuticals 1 credit

A study of pharmacologically prepared radioactive agents, including structure, quality control and use.

NMT 432 Non-Imaging Procedures 1 credit

A review of therapeutic and in-vitro procedures performed in nuclear medicine with an understanding of the physiology and pathophysiology associated with these procedures.

NMT 441 Nuclear Oncology 1 credit

The role of nuclear medicine relevant to the diagnosis, management, therapy and evaluation of therapeutic responses in patients with oncologic disorders.

NMT 451 Clinical Seminar/Research 2 credits

Considers important research topics in nuclear medicine in a format of informal discussion and provides the student with an opportunity to initiate and complete a research project.

NMT 452 Patient Ethics 1 credit

Designed to make students aware of complex situations in medicine that require moral reflection, judgment or decision.

NMT 461 Introduction to CT

An introduction to the concepts of CT including essential physical principles, hardware and system operations, CT safety and clinical imaging strategies.

 

NURSING COURSES

NUR 309 Health Promotion I 5 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in promoting the optimal health for the individual, theory and psychomotor skills essential to the practice of nursing are emphasized. A minimum grade of C+ is required.*

NUR 311 Health Assessment 3 credits

Provides the student with the techniques for carrying out a biopsychosocial, spiritual and cultural assessment of the individual. Developmental variations and cultural differences are addressed throughout the course. A minimum grade of C+ is required. *

NUR 313 Mental Health Promotion 4 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in promotion of optimal mental health. Theories of human behavior, biochemistry and the nursing process are used in caring for individuals experiencing alteration in mental health.*

NUR 314 Pharmacology 3 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in assessing/planning, implementing and evaluating the effects of pharmacologic agents used as therapeutic intervention for the client.

NUR 320 Family Health Promotion I 4 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in promoting optimal health of the family from pregnancy through the post-partum period. Family theory, theories of growth and development and the nursing process are used in providing family-centered care. Prerequisite: Successful completion of NUR 309, 311 and 314.*

NUR 321 Health Promotion II 4 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in promoting optimal health for the aging adult. Risk factors for illness and injury are identified and strategies for health promotion are explored in the areas of management of problems with mobility, management of altered genitourinary functioning, management of altered sensory perception, management of metabolic dysfunction, and management of altered breathing problems. Prerequisites: Successful completion of NUR 309, 311, and 314.*

NUR 322 Research I 2 credits

Focuses on understanding the research process and the role of the professional nurse in designing and conducting research. Quantitative and qualitative design are studied with emphasis on the use of research to improve nursing care. Co-requisite or pre-requisite NUR 309.

NUR 323 Concepts in Professional Nursing 2 credits

This course focuses on current issues and trends in nursing and health care for individuals from diverse cultural populations. The course provides an overview of professional issues in nursing, nursing education, the history of nursing and health care delivery. The course will also introduce legal, ethical and cultural issues that impact nursing practice. Co-requisite or prerequisite SPS 171.

NUR 324 Professional Nursing Seminar 3 credits

The student is introduced to the conceptual basis of professional nursing. The philosophy, purpose, objectives and organizing framework of the Cedar Crest nursing program are examined in relation to the theories and conceptual models of the discipline. Nursing process, legal and ethical issues, client systems, cultural diversity, research, communication and the nurse as an advocate are explored. This course is reserved for and required of all registered nurses. Prerequisite: RN to BS in Nursing students.

NUR 328 Nursing in the Global Community 2 credits

This course provides a unique opportunity for students to be a part of an international general medical and public health multidisciplinary team. While experiencing clinical work first hand, students will examine the socio-cultural and economic dimensions of health and illness and systems for delivering health care in a selected country. Emphasis will be placed on enhancing cultural awareness and sensitivity as well as developing cultural competence in nursing. Students will examine cultural differences and similarities through observation and interaction with patients, community members, and health care professionals. The class will begin on campus for discussion of reading materials and preparation for travel. The course will end with an on-campus class to reflect on lessons learned. Prerequisites: NUR 309 and 311

NUR 330 Family Health Promotion II 4 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in promoting optimal health of the family experiencing alterations in health, including perinatal complications and care of the child and adolescent with acute, chronic and disabling conditions. The course emphasizes the integration of family theory and nursing theory in caring for the family’s varied physical and psychosocial needs. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all junior- level nursing courses.*

NUR 331 Health Promotion III 5 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in promoting optimal health for the young and middle-aged adult. Risk factors for illness and injury will be identified and strategies for health promotion are explored in the areas of perioperative care, management of fluid/electrolyte imbalance, altered tissue perfusion, gastrointestinal dysfunction and neurological impairment. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all junior- level nursing courses.*

NUR 332 Research II (Capstone Experience) 3 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in the research process. Students synthesize knowledge from prior college course work and life experiences in order to demonstrate an understanding and incorporation of nursing research as an integral aspect of nursing practice. The practicum offers an area to apply information from the seminars in a real-world setting. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all junior level courses. RN students -NUR 322.

NUR 333 Health Promotion of the Community 5 credits

Focuses on the professional role of the professional nurse in promoting optimal heath of individuals, families and groups in home and community settings. The class emphasizes epidemiological theories as they relate to the health of the community. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all junior-level nursing courses. RN students - NUR 311, 322, and 324. Co-requisite or prerequisite NUR 330 and 331.**

NUR 335 Leadership in Nursing 5 credits

Focuses on the leadership and management roles of the professional nurse. This course emphasizes the management process in the delivery of health care. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all junior-level nursing courses. RN students – NUR 311, 322, and 324.*

NUR 341 Complex Health Problems 4 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse in promoting optimal health for multicultural individuals across the life span, who are experiencing complex health problems. Risk factors for illness and injury will be identified and strategies for health promotion will be explored for the care of clients with emergencies, trauma and burns, as well as those with neurologic, cardiac, oncologic, immune, and liver disorders. Prerequisite: Successful completion of all junior-level nursing courses and NUR 330, 331, and 332. Co-requisite or prerequisite NUR 333 and 335.*

NUR 342 Independent Practicum 4 credits

The focus of this course is to allow the student to gain increased clinical experience in an area of choice. Experience is dependent upon nursing faculty approval, availability of clinical sites and preceptors. Prerequisite: Successful completion of ALL nursing courses.*

*See Nursing Office for clinical hour requirements.

 

SCHOOL NURSE CERTIFICATION COURSES

SNC 380 Methodology in School Health Services 3 credits

Focuses on the role of the professional nurse within the school setting. The epidemiological prevention process model is used to explore health services, health education and the school environment. Emphasis is placed on the use of the nursing process to promote the health of members of the school community. Prerequisite: successful completion of Education 100, 200, Special Education 243, and Psychology 250.

SNC 381 School Nurse Practicum 5 credits

Focusing on the practice of school nursing, this course provides students with the opportunity for clinical practice within the school setting under the direct supervision of a school nurse preceptor. Students meet weekly to explore the philosophy, goals, and practice of the school health system. Prerequisite: successful completion of Education 100, 200, Special Education 243, Psychology 250, and School Nurse Cert 380.

NUTRITION COURSES

NTR 130 Food and Culture 3 credits

The roles of culture, religion, history, economics, and geography on food customs and attitudes of various cultural/ethnic groups are explored. A social awareness of selected food patterns and customs are illustrated. This course is open to all students.
 
NTR 200 Nutritional Biochemistry 3 credits

A study of the basic concepts of biochemistry applied to metabolism: carbohydrates, lipids, amino acids: enzymes and metabolic control; vitamins and co-factors. Emphasis is placed on metabolic pathways, the interrelationships of major nutrients and the relation of metabolic processes to the overall nutritional health of an individual. Prerequisite: CHE 203.

NTR 210 Principles of Human Nutrition 3 credits

The basic principles of human nutrition are investigated, emphasizing the nutrients, food sources, and their utilization in the body for growth and health throughout life. This course also assesses contemporary nutrition issues. Prerequisite: BIO 112 or BIO 117 or Chem 103 or instructor permission.

NTR 212 Nutrition for Women and Children 3 credits

A study of the changing nutritional needs that men, women and children encounter throughout the lifespan. Physiological, societal and economic factors and the availability of nutrition services are considered in meeting the nutritional demands of men, women and children from gestation through older adulthood. Prerequisite: NTR 210 or instructor permission.

NTR 217 Nutrition Education in the Community 3 credits

An in-depth examination of community nutrition and nutrition education including policy making; national nutrition agenda and nutrition programs; food security; program planning, implementation, and evaluation; learning theory, teaching methods, lesson plans, and development of client education materials. Students present a public policy statement, observe and carry out nutrition education programs. Prerequisites: NTR 210 and 212.

NTR 220 Principles of Foods 3 credits

A study of the selection, preparation and storage of food. Techniques in food preparation are developed. Food components and their specific nature and behavior during preparation are introduced, along with the recognition and evaluation of quality in food products. Basic kitchen utensils and equipment will be covered. Lecture: 2 hours; laboratory: 3 hours. Prerequisite: NTR 210 or instructor permission.  

NTR 300 Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism I 3 credits

An intensive study of functions, digestion/absorption, interrelationships, cellular metabolism of the macronutrients; determination of nutrient requirements, assessment of nutritional status, fluid balance and acid base balance during health, disease and exercise. NTR 300 must be taken before NTR 305. Prerequisites: BIO 117, 118, NTR 200 

NTR 301 Management in Dietetics       3 credits

An in-depth treatment of management theories, human resources management, financial management, information management and other management topics related to food systems and clinical management. This course offers the application of management principles in simulations and case studies. Prerequisite: Junior standing, NTR 210 or instructor permission.

NTR 305 Advanced Nutrition and Metabolism II 3 credits

An intensive study of functions, digestion/absorption, interrelationships, cellular metabolism of the micronutrients; determination of nutrient requirements, and assessment of nutritional status in health, disease and exercise. Prerequisites: BIO 117, 118, NTR 300, NTR 200.

NTR 320 Experimental Foods               3 credits

Controlled experimentation and evaluation of methods of preparation of foods. Students complete a research project based on an area of individual interest. Lecture: 2 hours, laboratory: 3 hours. Prerequisites: NTR 220, CHE 203

NTR 327 Medical Nutrition Therapy I     4 credits

A comparative view of nutrition as it relates to the treatment of disease, this course emphasizes the evaluation of assessment data, the nutrition care process, methods of nutrition support, food and drug interactions, herbal remedies, weight management and applications of nutrition interventions for cardiovascular disease, hypertension and diabetes. Lecture 3.5 hours, laboratory field experience: 2 hours. Prerequisite: NTR 305.

NTR 328 Medical Nutrition Therapy II 4 credits

A comparative view of nutrition as it relates to the treatment of disease, this course emphasizes the evaluation of assessment data, the nutrition care process, methods of nutrition support, food and drug interactions and applications of nutrition interventions for diseases of the gastrointestinal tract, liver and biliary tract, pancreas, metabolic stress, anemias, heart failure and transplant, pulmonary disorders, cancer, HIV infections, renal disease and metabolic disorders.Lecture 3.5 hours, laboratory field experience: 2 hours. Prerequisite: NTR 327.

NTR 330 Food Systems Operations      4 credits

An in-depth treatment of foodservice operations, including sanitation; foodservice planning, design, and equipment; facility management; menu planning; food purchasing, receiving, and storage; production management; assembly, distribution, and service; and marketing. This course includes one hands-on quantity food project and weekly field experiences (2 hours) in an area of food service. Lecture: 3.5 hours, Field Experience: 2 hours. Prerequisites: NTR 210, 220, 301 or instructor permission.

NTR 340 Nutrition Counseling               3 credits

An in-depth examination of communication and counseling skills for the nutrition counselor. Application of interviewing and counseling skills in prevention and treatment of obesity, coronary heart disease, diabetes, renal disease, hypertension, cancer, and other diseases are studied. This course includes field experiences in area health care facilities. Prerequisites: NTR 217 and 327 or or instructor permission..

NTR 350 Seminar in Nutrition Capstone 3 credits

A comprehensive review of methodological approaches  to qualitative and quantitative research. It is designed to assist students in judging worth and utility of research as a knowledgeable consumer and applying this knowledge in the generation of a research study. The course is designed to include formal and informal writing assignments. Current issues in dietetics as well as career options are also discussed. Prerequisite: Senior Nutrition Student standing NTR 300, 305 & 327or instructor permission..

OTHER COURSES OFFERED BY THE ALLEN CENTER

The following courses are open to students of all majors. They may be of special interest to students majoring in education, nursing, gerontology, psychology, or social work; or those with a personal interest in nutrition and fitness. These courses have no prerequisites and are not a part of the nutrition major.

NTR 113 Nutrition and Fitness 1 credit

Body energy sources and metabolism, nutrient requirements for fitness and diets for building and maintaining a healthy body throughout life are surveyed along with the benefits of exercise.

NTR 114 Nutrition and the Elderly 1 credit

An overview of nutrition as it relates to aging. Emphasis is placed on using and developing tools and skills that can be used with the elderly to assess their nutritional status and methods to meet their nutritional needs.

NTR 115 Eating Disorders and Weight Management 1 credit

Characteristics of health and nutrition problems, emphasizing the prevention, early detection and treatment of eating disorders such as anorexia and bulimia are investigated. The course also looks at fad diets, weight management concerns, and sound weight loss plans.

 

PHILOSOPHY COURSES

PHI 100 Introduction to Philosophy 3 credits

Examines the genesis and treatment of the major problems of Western philosophy. These problems include: what it means to be a human being; how knowledge is possible; and how human beings ought to act (ethics). Students read philosophers such as Plato, Aristotle, Descartes, Locke, Mill, Kant and Sartre to understand the solutions they offered to these perennial questions.

PHI 105 World Philosophies 3 credits

An examination of the major themes of philosophy in many different cultures and traditions. Themes include: What is reality? What is god? And what is freedom?

PHI 131 Introduction to Logic 3 credits

Investigates the problems of ordinary language, fallacies and the assumptions underlying deductive systems.

PHI 141 Philosophy of Woman 3 credits

A critical investigation of some of the major texts of Western philosophy, as well as some feminist texts, with regard to how they describe and define “woman.” At the same time, the present condition of women’s lives is explored to see how women have been and continue to be affected by the definition of “woman” provided by philosophers, theologians, advertisers and the media.

PHI 200 Ethics 3 credits

Analyzes the major texts of moral philosophy, with particular attention to applying the theories of ethics to contemporary ethical issues.

PHI 201 Ancient Philosophy 3 credits

An investigation of the historical, cultural and intellectual sources of philosophy in the ancient world. Readings include Homer, the Pre-Socratics, Plato, and Aristotle.

PHI 217 Aesthetics 3 credits

A discussion of major aesthetic theories, readings in original sources, and the discussion method.

PHI 250 Introduction to Professional Ethics 3 credits

An introduction to the fundamental principles of ethical theory and their application to the professions. While individual professions will be discussed, the emphasis will be on the ethical principles and issues which apply to all professions.

PHI/BIO 320 Biomedical Ethics 3credits

Offers an investigation of ethical issues, using philosophical models and biomedical case studies, in areas of death and dying, human experimentation, reproductive manipulation, genetic engineering, behavioral control and health-care delivery. Prerequisite: Junior standing.

PHI 360 Special Topics 1-3 credits

Students examine a selected topic for intensive study. Emphasis may be on certain philosophers, schools of philosophic thought, or a philosophic issue of concern to students.

PHI 390 Independent Study 1-3 credits

Individual projects of one-term length under the guidance of the department.

 

PHYSICS COURSES

PHY 101 Introductory College Physics I 4 credits

A study of the basic principles and laws of classical mechanics. Specific topics include Newton’s laws of motion and gravitation and their application to the concepts of energy, momentum and angular momentum, circular motion, and wave motion. The goal is a basic understanding of the nature of physical reality and its application to other sciences. Problem-solving and laboratory experience are essential means towards this end. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.

PHY 102 Introductory College Physics II 4 credits

A continuation of the study of classical physics started in Physics 101. Major topics include fluid mechanics, electricity, magnetism, electromagnetic waves, and optics. In addition, there is an introduction to the concepts of quantum physics. In addition to the goals of the prerequisite course, the connections between physics and modern technology are frequently explored. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisite: PHY 101.

 

POLITICAL SCIENCE COURSES

PSC 202 Law and Justice 3 credits

A historically-based examination of the American legal system as seen from the perspective of the institutional practices and decision making processes whereby justice is administered in the United States. Particular attention is devoted to the subject of legal reasoning as this applies to the task of interpreting constitutions, statutes, and common law principles. The course also addresses the institutional characteristics of the American judicial system, the nature of legal education in the United States and the distinctive role that lawyers and judges play in regard to both the formulation and administration of law.

PSC 207 Law and Women’s Rights 3 credits

An analysis of the most pressing legal issues confronting women in contemporary American society. Topics include sex discrimination, family law, reproductive rights, sexual harassment, and pay equity. Particular attention is devoted to landmark federal and state court decisions relating to the meaning of women’s rights and competing judicial philosophies as to how these rights should be understood within the context of contemporary American society.

PSC 210 American Public Policy 3 credits

An examination of the most pressing domestic issues confronting American society in the 21st century as seen from the perspective of the analytical and rhetorical techniques most commonly used by advocates to represent public policy issues and evaluate public policy choices. Topics include health care, education, criminal justice, social welfare policies, immigration, and environmental issues. Particular attention is devoted to the role that symbolic representation plays in regard to the process of defining public policy problems and identifying solutions.

PSC 211 Globalization and International Law 3 credits

A topically-based analysis of the most pressing international legal issues raised by the process of globalization. Particular attention is devoted to the subject of transnational and international crime. Topics include drug trafficking, genocide, sex trafficking, terrorism, intellectual property theft, and war crimes. The course also provides students with an introduction to the fundamentals of international law and the key institutions that comprise the international criminal justice system.

PSC 218 Criminal Procedure and Constitutional Rights 3 credits

A legal analysis of the due process rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution as seen from the perspective of the institutional procedures and law enforcement techniques employed by federal and state governments. Primary attention is devoted to the Fourth, Fifth, Sixth and Eighth Amendments as they relate to government’s ability to investigate and prosecute individuals suspected of engaging in criminal activities.

PSC 250 Modern Political Thought 3 credits

A comparative analysis of contemporary political ideologies as seen from the perspective of their philosophical assumptions, normative values, substantive political principles, and public policy agendas. Particular attention is devoted to Liberal and Conservative thought, although the course also systematically examines ideologies such as Christian and Islamic fundamentalism, Marxism, Democratic Socialism, Feminism, Fascism, and Environmentalism.

PSC 260 Special Topics 1-3 credits

PSC 300 Topics in Law and Public Policy 3 credits

A topically-based seminar featuring an in-depth analysis of a particular public policy issue as seen from the perspective of the legal factors and considerations associated with that issue-area. The content of the seminar varies and students may repeat the class for credit as the topic of the course changes. (Cross-listed as Honors 300).

PSC 390 Independent Study 1-3 credits

 

PSYCHOLOGY COURSES

PSY 100 General Psychology 3 credits

A survey of basic concepts, issues and areas of psychology. It introduces students to a scientific approach to understanding behavior. It is a prerequisite for all other psychology course

PSY 201 Mind-Body Medicine 3 credits

This course follows the biological, psychological, social and spiritual model of health and wellness. While disease prevention, health-related research and rehabilitation issues are discussed, the main focus of the course is on exploring the mind-body-spirit connections. This course will also examine the latest literature in the area of disease-prone and disease-resistant personality.

PSY 202 Stress, Disease and Psychophysiological Interventions 3 credits

It has been estimated that 70 to 90% of medical and psychological office visits are due to stress-related conditions. The purpose of this course is twofold. During the first half of the course, the psychobiology of stress and the effects of exposure to prolonged stress are discussed. The second half of the course focuses on specific stress-related conditions and their psychophysiological treatments. This course involves laboratory work in psychophysiology.

PSY 204 Psychology of Religion 3 credits

An exploration of the historic connections between Psychology and Religion which are understood as foundational to both disciplines in Western thought. Students explore the work of William James, Carl Jung and other theorists and apply their understanding of religious phenomena and experience to both patterns of praxis and thought. The class probes the role of mysticism, prayer and meditation as manifestations of religion that can be best understood through the application of psychology.

PSY 206 - Positive Psychology 3 credits

Positive Psychology examines empirically informed perspectives on what makes life worth living. It addresses aspects of the human condition that lead to happiness and a purposeful life.  This course will provide an overview of the research and applications in the field of Positive Psychology.  Topics will include happiness, resiliency, optimism, relationships, self-efficacy, goals and optimal performance, well-being, gratitude, character strength, motivation and flow, positive coping, and mindfulness.

PSY 209 Family Dynamics 3 credits

This course is designed to help students acquire an understanding of a variety of issues affecting family functioning. Issues discussed will range from couples issues, stages of relationships, codependency in relationships, communication skills and how they affect the family dynamic, work and families, blended/stepfamilies, parenting styles, and different theories of family therapy.

PSY 211 Experimental Methods 4 credits

An introduction to the scientific field of research and data analysis that is required for working in any area of psychology. Topics include qualitative and quantitative experimental methods, selection of subjects, validity and ethical considerations, literature searches, and composing APA-style documents. The SPSS computer package will be introduced along with descriptive statistics, and mini-field experiments will be conducted. This course MUST be taken the semester immediately before PSY 212. Students must receive a grade of C or better in PSY 211 before going on to PSY 212. This course is for declared psychology majors only.

PSY 212 Statistical Methods 4 credits

A continuation of the exploration of the scientific field of psychology research and data analysis. Topics include theory, computation, and application of various descriptive and inferential (nonparametric and parametric) statistics. The SPSS computer package will be used for each data analysis method, and data analyses will be tied to specific research designs and mini-field experiments. This course MUST be taken immediately after PSY 211. Students must receive a grade of C or better in PSY 211 before going on to PSY 212.This course is for declared psychology majors only.

PSY 217 Careers in Psychology 1 credit

This course will provide you with information and skills that will help you develop a portfolio, and select and pursue a career in psychology or a related field.  This course should be taken in your sophomore or junior year.

PSY 220 Sensation and Perception 3 or 4 credits

(Cross-listed as Neuroscience/Biolo gy 220; Alternate years)

An in-depth study of sensory systems including vision,  taste, olfaction, audition and somatic senses. Lab is  required for Neuroscience majors. This course fulfills only the 3 credit SCI requirement.

PSY 222   Psychology in Current Events 1 credit

The media and press play an enormous role in providing information and stories to the public; many are related to the field of psychology.  This course will explore current news events and bridge the gap between psychological principles and theories and application in the real world.  Discussion, dialogue, and debate will be used to stimulate critical thinking on controversial psychological issues.

PSY/HON 224 Women in the Workplace 3 credits

An examination of the theory, research, and practice of various issues involving women in the workplace. Topics include: the history of women at work; nontraditional occupations and roles; gender differences in communication, leadership, and work  styles; management and associated psychological paradigms; relevant legal and political issues; work-life dilemmas and personal planning and growth strategies. Active participation is required.

PSY 227 Principles of Helping Relationships 3 credits

The goal of this course is to enhance student’s ability to establish and maintain effective interpersonal relationships.  This course focuses on the dynamics found in virtually all interpersonal relationships.  Through numerous experiential exercises and examples, students will learn the important skills necessary for successful relationships such as effective communication skills, building trust, and conflict resolution.

PSY 229 Introduction to Biological Psychology (crosslisted as NEU 200) 3 credits

The goal of this course is the study of the biological mechanisms of behavior. In this course, students gain knowledge about the various neurochemical and biopsychological processes that are involved in behaviors. The course moves from an overview of how the nervous system works, how it regulates the various functions of the body, to how the biology of the nervous system influences individuality and behavior. This course fulfills only the 3 credit SCI requirement.

PSY 230 Team Building and Group Dynamics 3 credits

An overview of teams and groups in a social and work  context. Discussion will include: the evolution and development of teams, the emergence of member roles and leaders, decision-making and problem-solving techniques, communication processes, power and conflict issues, management of diversity, and teambuilding strategies. Experiential exercises will be emphasized.

PSY/HON 231 Social Psychology for Psychology 3 credits

This course will examine theoretical perspectives as well as laboratory and field research demonstrating the importance of situational influences on behavior. Topics include: self-concept and presentation of self, attitude formation and persuasion, conformity and obedience, as well as factors influencing interpersonal attraction, interpersonal aggression, and pro-social behavior.

PSY 235 Psychology of Adjustment 3 credits

A study of the universal search by individuals for happiness, security and a healthy, meaningful life. Topics covered will include, but are not limited to: self-discovery in adolescence and adulthood, sickness, health and coping, and intimate relationships. The course will cover the adjustments to natural changes and tasks that accompany growth and development.

PSY 241 Child Development 3 credits

A study of human development through infancy and the childhood years with emphasis on the psychological processes that are involved.

PSY 250 LifeSpan Development 3 credits

A theoretical and empirical exploration of human development from conception through the later years and death. Course content covers bio-social, cognitive and psychosocial development during each stage of life.

PSY/HON 251 Health Psychology 3 credits

Health Psychology is a rapidly growing field within the discipline of psychology. It is devoted to the understanding of psychological factors that affect health and disease. The course emphasizes theoretical developments and empirical findings in Health Psychology.

PSY 234 Ergonomics 1 credit

This course introduces students to the area of “Human Factors”, which applies knowledge of human behavior, abilities, and attributes to the design of tools, equipment, and large-scale systems (e.g., cars, kitchens) for human use. Psychologists in this growing area aim to solve “real-world” problems by improving the usability, efficiency, comfort, and safety of various products. Assignments provide hands-on analysis and discussion for design improvement.

PSY 301 Psychology at Work 3 credits

A study of psychological concepts and methods applied to the workplace. Topics include: personnel selection and legal issues, training, evaluation, worker motivation and satisfaction, organizational culture and behavior, and workflow design. Assignments provide hands-on experience.

PSY 303 - The Psychology of Anxiety 3 credit

Anxiety is a complex construct that has played a key role in the development of several theories and systems of psychology. This course explores the many dimensions of this construct through the lens of theoretical perspectives such as psychoanalysis, behaviorism, existentialism, humanism, psychophysiology, and cognitive psychology. The course will make a deliberate distinction between healthy and pathological states of anxiety.  Additionally, students will gain knowledge about the differences and similarities between the experience of fear and anxiety with emphasis on the ontological nature of the latter. Prerequisite: PSY 229 / NEU 200

PSY 309 Abnormal Psychology 3 credits

This course introduces students to the multidimensional approach to psychopathology, as well as clinical assessment and diagnoses of mental disorders.  Attention is given to the disorders listed in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.  Recommended: Junior Standing

PSY 310 Forensic Psychology 3 credits

A study of psychology and the law including the court system and legal process, psychological assessment applied to legal issues of child custody, mens rea defenses, developmental problems,  problems faced by psychologists as expert witnesses, and criminal profiling. Prerequisite: PSY 211; Recommended: PSY 309 and Junior Standing (or permission of the instructor).

PSY 311 Criminal Behavior and Profiling 3 credits

This course examines criminal behavior as it is manifest in violent crimes, including psychopathic behavior, and serial killers.  Students will learn to profile criminal behavior by using three methodologies to guide profile generation.  For upper level students (junior and senior status) only.  Prerequisites: PSY 211 & PSY 309.

PSY 312 Psychological Assessment 3 credits

The goal of this course is to expose students to the theories and techniques of psychological testing.  Students will learn the basic psychometric principles that apply to all types of tests, learn how to administer, score, and interpret some widely used tests, and will learn about the applications of tests in various settings such as health, industry, clinical, and forensic settings.  Prerequisite: A grade of C or better in PSY 212.

PSY 315 Counseling Children 3 credits

This course is designed to provide students with specialized knowledge and skills necessary for counseling children. The course will address individual and group techniques used in treatment such as play therapy, the use of art, puppets, games, etc.  Students will also gain an understanding of the parent’s role and family dynamics when working with children. Prerequisite: PSY 250.

PSY 316 Systems of Psychotherapy 3 credits

This course is an in depth examination of the current major approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. The course explores psychoanalytic psychotherapies, client centered therapy, feminist therapy, cognitive therapy, existential therapy, rational-emotive therapy, behavior therapy, and multi-model therapy. Prerequisite: PSY 309 or 351.

PSY 317 Learning 4 credits

An introduction to basic principles of learning, including such aspects as operant, classical conditioning and social learning theories.  Lecture three hours, laboratory. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in PSY 211 and junior standing.

PSY 332 Comparative Animal Behavior 3 credits

This course will familiarize students with the methodology and major theories of comparative animal behavior, with an emphasis on primates, but including other species as well. Topics will include perception, motivation, learning, self-recognition, intentionality, emotions, and cognition.

PSY 335 Cross-cultural Psychology 3 credits

An introduction to the field of cross-cultural psychology.  Readings will be selected to demonstrate how psychologists are examining the many ways in which behavior, thoughts and feelings are influenced by an individual’s culture.  Emphasis will be placed on the methods by which psychologists study cultural differences. This course may include a study-abroad component.

PSY 336 Cognitive Psychology 4 credits

An overview of the scientific field of cognitive psychology. Students become familiar with the different areas studied in the field, including attention, perception, memory, decision-making, language and problem solving. Students critically read key research articles at the core of the field. Laboratory experiments provide an opportunity to experience the application of various principles and concepts discussed in class. Lecture three hours, laboratory. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in PSY 211 and junior standing.

PSY 339 Existential Psychology and the Search for Meaning 3 credits

Explores the contributions of existentialism to the field of clinical psychology. Central to existentialism are concepts such as freedom, responsibility, anxiety, suffering, and search for meaning. These and other existential concepts will be explored through close examination of the works of authors such as Kierkegaard, Kafka, Tolstoy, Nietzsche, Frankl, Yalom and May. Prerequisites: PSY 351.

PSY 342 Professional Ethics 3 credits

This course uses the case study approach to provide general and specific guidance for ethical conduct in the science and practice of psychology. A variety of issues will be covered, including professional competence, confidentiality, client rights, animal and human research, informed consent, integrity and respect, as well as other topics. The primary goal of the course is to provide students with knowledge and skills necessary for ethical decision-making and ethical behavior. A secondary goal is to familiarize students with the history and current role of the American Psychological Association in establishing guidelines and professional codes of ethics for research, teaching, and practice in psychology. In addition, students learn about federal mandates (e.g., HIPAA), state licensure boards, and other legal and professional guidelines that apply in situations commonly faced by clinicians, researchers and instructors. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in PSY 211, PSY 250, and junior standing.

PSY 350 History and Systems of Psychology 3 credits

A study of major schools and systems of psychology, their historical and philosophical foundations and the people associated with the evolution of the field of psychology. This course is intended to provide an in depth understanding of the issues that have been important to psychology and an understanding of the discipline as it exists today.

PSY 351 Theories of Personality 3 credits

Introduces the works of selected personality theories exploring human behavior and personality development. It includes representatives of the psychodynamic, trait and humanistic/existential orientations.  Recommended: Junior Standing.

PSY 360 Seminar: Special Topics 3 credits

Depending upon student interest, this seminar course covers topics, problems and/or methods not ordinarily included in regularly scheduled courses.

PSY 364 Psychology Literature Review 3 credits

A study of the steps involved in preparing literature reviews in the behavioral sciences. The primary focus is on collecting original research published in academic journals, selecting appropriate pieces, and writing and presenting a sound and comprehensive research review. Prerequisites: A grade of C or better in PSY 211 and PSY 212, and junior standing.

PSY 365 Psychology Thesis I 3 credits

Provides the student with an opportunity to initiate and complete a research project in one of several areas predetermined by the course instructor. Grounded in the psychological literature, students will design a novel empirical investigation based on wok being done in the faculty mentor’s lab/areas of research interest. Under faculty supervision, the student will be responsible for developing all stimulus materials and measures, and getting approval to carry out their research through the Cedar Crest College Institutional Review Board (IRB). Students will submit an APA-formatted research proposal at the conclusion of the fall semester, and will share their proposal with the college community at a poster session. At the end of the spring semester students are required to submit an APA-format manuscript based on their completed research, and present their research results at both the annual Cedar Crest College Health and Wellness Conference and the annual LVAIC Undergraduate Psychology Conference. Prerequisites: A grade of B or better in both PSY 211 and 212 is required to enroll in PSY 365. Senior standing is normally required, but advanced juniors may receive permission to enroll. An application/proposal must be submitted the spring semester prior to the planned research.

PSY 366 Psychology Thesis II 3 credits

Continuation of year-long research project started in fall semester (PSY 365). Students will carry out their investigation, collecting and analyzing their data. Students will submit an APA-formatted research manuscript at the conclusion of the semester. Students are also required to present their research results at the annual Cedar Crest College Health and Wellness Conference, as well as at the annual LVAIC Undergraduate Psychology Conference, both at the end of the spring semester. Prerequisites: A grade of B or better in PSY 365 is required in order for a student to continue on in PSY 366.

 

RELIGIOUS STUDIES COURSES

REL 100 Introduction to Religion and Culture 3 credits

An introduction to the nature of religious belief and its relationship to culture. Students explore myth, ritual and, using a variety of disciplines including anthropology, sociology of religion and the history of religions. Attitudes toward religion in American popular culture and expressions of the sacred in art, music and the media are examined.

REL 101 Ancient Egyptian Religion 3 credits

An exploration of ancient Egyptian religion including the role of belief, mythology, cosmology, ritual and art. The course provides students with an understanding of the function of religion as a comprehensive system of culture that exerted a formative influence on ancient Egyptian society throughout its 3000-year history. Students are exposed to the study of ancient Egyptian religion through a variety of interdependent approaches including archaeology, textual analysis, history, anthropology and the history of religions. The role of Egypt in the Ancient Near East is also explored with attention to its formative influence on the biblical tradition. Participants are also exposed to biblical criticism and learn how scripture evolves in inter-cultural contexts. REL 101 may also be used as preparation for group trips to Egypt which are offered in alternative years.

REL 120 Religions of South and East Asia 3 credits

An exploration of a variety of global world religious traditions including Hinduism, Buddhism, Sikhism, Jainism, Taoism and Islam. Students study ritual, art, the relationship between religion and culture, as well as the philosophical foundations of each faith. Visits to regional religious institutions are included.

REL/PSY 204 Psychology and Religion 3 credits

An exploration of the relationship between religion and psychology, drawing on both classical and modern theorists. Students explore religious experience, mysticism and ritual and their influence on the role of the individual in society.

REL 220 Death and Dying 3 credits

A critical examination of major theological, philosophical, ethical and psychological themes surrounding death. The course emphasizes cross-cultural awareness, providing students with analytical skills to understand the interpretation of death globally and in American culture.

REL 225 Buddhism in America 3 credits

In this writing intensive course, students explore the growth of Buddhism in the United States through immigrant communities and converts. Participants study ritual, art and other facets of Buddhist cultures, exploring patterns of retention and adaptation of the tradition in the United States. Participants will also have the opportunity to meet Buddhist teachers and monks both in field settings and in the class. As part of the course students will be required to participate in a day long session of meditation training at a Zen Buddhist monastery on a Saturday early in the semester.

REL 226 Hinduism in America 3 credits

As the dominant religion of India, Hinduism has had a continuing influence on patterns of belief and culture in South Asia. In this course students explore the ways in which these cultural patterns have been brought to the United States by large numbers of devotees since reforms to U.S. immigration policy in 1965. Through visits to Hindu temples within our region participants come to understand the globalization of a tradition once through to be entirely confined to the Indian subcontinent. This course may be offered in conjunction with short term study abroad experiences in India.

REL 227 Islam in America 3 credits

A study of the recent rapid growth of Islam among immigrants and converts in the United States. Participants explore Islam both as a belief system and as a civilization, examining patterns of Islamic art, mysticism and law. They study the global resurgence of Islam as a complexes cross-cultural framework within which the growth of U.S. Muslim communities has taken place. Field visits to mosques an Islamic centers within the region are part of the course.

REL 233 Spirituality and Wellness 3 credits

An exploration of the relationships between religious belief, practice and health. Students analyze an expanding genre of literature that bridges the disciplines of psychology and religious studies, gaining critical awareness of the writings of Carl Jung, Viktor Frankl, Paul Tillich, Carl Rogers and others. Exploring a variety of common themes in this literature including the search for meaning, identity and transcendence they analyze cross-cultural connections between spirituality and health, students explore the relationship of the themes with practices of meditation, prayer and ritual.

REL 390 Independent Study 3 credits

Individual research projects, and directed readings carried out under faculty supervision.

 

SOCIAL WORK COURSES

SWK 201 Introduction to Social Work 4 credits

The field of social work, its values, methods and settings are studied as well as the organization and role of the social work profession. The course includes an introduction to the generic aspects of social work methods in assisting individuals and groups and the use of community resources. Includes on-site observations with social work professionals.

SWK/SOC 202 The Social Welfare Institution 3 credits

The social welfare organization as the institutional response to the social problems resulting from changes in society and culture; historical development; philosophical, humanitarian and religious foundations; trends in social welfare, including concern for poverty and the poor; the delivery of social welfare services and their extension to areas of need other than economic.

SWK/SOC 243 Social and Psychological Aspects of Aging 4 credits

An introduction to the field of aging and elderly. Three primary areas of inquiry are studied: the biological, psychological and sociological aspects of aging; exploration of specific problem areas for the aging and elderly; and death and dying.

SWK/SOC 245 Introduction to Peace Studies 3 credits

SWK 254 Violence in the Family 3 credits

Examines violence in the family from a sociological and psychological perspective. The student will develop a knowledge and understanding of the recent research and theory of various forms of familial violence. The student will gain a familiarity with the forms violence takes in the family as well as an understanding of the past and current societal response to familial violence. The course makes use of lectures, discussion and films.

SWK 260 Special Topics in Human Services 1-3 credits

Special topics are offered to provide more in-depth knowledge about current areas of practice or issues in human services. These courses are intended to meet the needs of students in social work, psychology, nursing, and education.

SWK 300 Community Organizing 3 credits

Includes strategies for organization and development of local communities to meet human needs and to enhance the social environment. Special emphasis is placed on the role of the community organizer in working with established community structures, identifying and encouraging leadership, and facilitating planned community change.

SWK 303 Human Behavior and the Social Environment 3 credits

Builds on a strong theory foundation for social work practice with specific content in social, behavioral and biological sciences. A bio-psycho-socio-cultural-spiritual framework for students to view human growth and development through the life-span will be examined. The “person in environment” focus is approached from an ecological perspective of individual in the context of family, groups and the community. The social systems model will help students focus on the dynamic interplay and reciprocal nature of the person and the environment. Prerequisites: Psychology 100; Sociology 100; Anthropology 100; Biology 111 and 112; or permission of the instructor.

SWK 304 Child Abuse, Maltreatment & Neglect in Childhood and Adolescence  3 credits

Child abuse, maltreatment and neglect is a pervasive social problem that affects families and communities. This course will examine the history of child maltreatment, policy, practice and prevention issues. Specific content on child physical abuse, sexual abuse, child neglect, psychological maltreatment and other related forms of child abuse will be explored. The role of child welfare, the legal system and cultural and international abuse issues will be addressed in this course.

SWK/SOC 313 Minorities and Human Relations 3 credits

An overview of the issues associated with prejudice and discrimination directed against minority populations based on gender, race, sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity and physical/mental ability. The impact of these issues in the U.S. as well as globally will be examined. Special emphasis is placed on understanding the social and psychological roots of prejudice.

SWK/SOC 321 The Family as a Social Institution 3 credits

SWK/SOC 324 Social Science Statistics 3 credits

SWK 325 Social Work Research Methods and Design 4 credits

Provides practitioners with the understanding of a scientific, analytical approach to knowledge building. Examines the concepts of theory development, conceptualization and hypothesis formulation across social work practice. The content includes research design, sampling, instrumentation, methods of data collection and analysis as well as descriptive inferential statistics and critical analysis of empirical research. The student will develop an original research project to be carried out in Social Work 326. Prerequisites: Social Work 201, 202, Mathematics 102 and Sociology 324.

SWK 326 Evaluating Social Work Research 4 credits

This is the second of two methods courses (Social Work 325 and 326) in applied research. Students will apply the scientific and analytic approaches to building knowledge for practice and evaluation of social work practice. The goal of the course is to provide students with the opportunity to carry out an original research study developed by the students in Social Work 325 that evaluates services delivery in all areas of practice. The student will be able to critically evaluate the research findings and learn to use empirical data appropriately in practice. Prerequisite: Social Work 325.

SWK 327 Social Work Processes: Individuals, Families, Groups 4 credits

Problem-solving processes relevant to social work practice considered within a social systems frame of reference. Methods common to all fields of social work are stressed, including communication and interpersonal interaction processes, assessment procedures, interventive strategies and the sequential phases of the helping process. Content will examine human diversity, life-span development, and the life model. Applied experience involving videotaping interviewing techniques. Prerequisites: Social Work 201, 202, 300 and 303.

SWK 328 Poverty and Income Redistribution 3 credits

An examination of the systems of resource allocation in the United States, the economic foundations upon which these systems are based, their inefficiencies and inequalities, and the means of redistributing resources to eliminate/reduce conditions of poverty. Specific reference will be made to those social welfare programs and policies known as income maintenance, including their financing and political development, and their critical analysis through the application of key socioeconomic criteria. Prerequisite: Social Work 201 and 202 or permission of instructor.

SWK 329 Generalist Social Work Practice 3 credits

An examination of generalist social work practice including values, knowledge and skills needed to work with individuals, groups, communities and organizations. Attention will be paid to the links between micro, mezzo, and macro levels of practice reflecting the holistic systems approach central to the social work profession. The course intends to integrate numerous case examples and practice applications to further clarify key social work practice principles and demonstrate how skills are applied in generalist social work practice settings. Key topics such as managed care, empowerment in practice, family assessment issues, human diversity and ethical dilemmas will be highlighted to challenge students to think critically.

SWK 339 Field Education in Social Work I (Capstone Experience) 9 credits

A required field education experience applying theoretical knowledge gained in previous courses. Student chooses placement in a cooperating community service agency under professional supervision. Equal attention is given to cognitive and attitudinal aspects of learning to deal with people who have a range of backgrounds and problems. To be taken concurrently with Social Work 345. Four-hundred and fifty hours in the field required with one-hour weekly seminar on campus. No credit will be given for previous field education or job experience. Taken in the fall and spring semesters of the student’s senior year. Prerequisites: Social Work 201, 202, 303, 327 and 328.

SWK 342 Field Education in Social Work II 1-9 credits

An elective field education experience available to students who have completed Social Work 339. Students may choose to continue with the same agency used for Social Work 339 or choose another agency setting. Prerequisites: Social Work 339 and 345.

SWK 345 Field Education Seminar I (Capstone Experience) 3 credits

Taken concurrently with Social Work 339 and provides the opportunity to integrate and reconcile theoretical concepts learned in foundation and professional social work courses and apply them to the field education experience. The integration of theory and practice is the keynote of this seminar.

SWK 346 Field Education Seminar II (Capstone Experience) 3 credits

An advanced course in social work principles, methods and values, in practice. Emphasis is on the continued development of practice theory. A capstone course in social work practice in which special consideration is given to critical issues in contemporary social work practice. Guest lecturers who are professionals in the field and audiovisual aids will be used to exemplify current social work theory and alternative modes of practice. Prerequisites: Social Work 339 and 345

SWK 360 Special Topics in Social Work 1-3 credits

Special topics courses are occasionally offered in subjects of special interest to social work students.

SWK 390 Independent Study 1-3 credits

 

SOCIOLOGY COURSES

SOC 100 Introduction to Culture and Society 3 credits

An introduction to sociology, the scientific study of the relationship between social organization and human behavioral processes. The focus is on concepts central to the discipline and the illustration and application of theoretical perspectives to aspects of social reality such as gender, age, race and ethnicity, inequality and social change, as well as social institutions including the family, polity, education, medicine, economy and religion. The course equips students to be informed participants in social processes and institutions, both from an appreciative and change agent stance.

SOC/SWK 202 The Social Welfare Institution 3 credits

SOC 222 Social Justice: A Global Perspective 3 credits

This course teaches global awareness of human rights violations and a basic understanding of programs and resources existing to combat human suffering. Global inequalities will be viewed through the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Topics examined are: AIDS pandemic, child soldiers, human trafficking, genocide, feminization of poverty and violence, war refugees, post-apartheid South Africa and global child exploitation.

SOC/SWK 243 Social and Psychological Aspects of Aging 4 credits

An introduction to the field of aging and elderly. Three primary areas of inquiry are studied: the biological, psychological and sociological aspects of aging; exploration of specific problem areas for the aging and elderly; and death and dying.

SOC/SWK 245 Introduction to Peace Studies 3 credits

An overview of the history, philosophy and ideas encompassing the evolving field of peace studies. Topics include the causes of war, the nature of power, approaches to building peace, nonviolent conflict resolution, community mediation techniques and consensus decision-making.

SOC 252 Social Psychology 3 credits

This subfield in sociology and psychology examines how the thought, feelings and actions of individuals are linked to the behavior of others and to larger processes of human social organization. The focus is on concepts and frameworks central to the field and the illustration and application of these frameworks to aspects of everyday life. Topics include: aggression, conformity, interpersonal attraction, attitude formation and change, group dynamics, status-roles, personality and self and mental illness. The course equips students to be informed participants in social process and the impact societal institutions have on such processes.

SOC/SWK 270 Contemporary Environmental Issues 3 credits

An examination of the environment health of the world focusing on specific global problems in urgent need of resolution. Primary emphasis is on the social, economic and political issues that surround each environmental problem.

SOC/SWK 313 Minorities and Human Relations 3 credits

A comparative study of racial and ethnic contacts with emphasis on such social processes as acculturation, conflict, competition, anticipatory socialization and marginality, nationalistic movements and prejudice.

SOC/SWK 321 The Family as a Social Institution 3 credits

A consideration of family and marriage as basic institutions in human societies with emphasis upon the variety of forms they assume in different cultures and subcultures, including ethnic, regional and class variations in American society. Special attention is paid to modifications in family and marriage patterns, structure and customs in response to social and cultural change, particularly the rapid changes occurring in the 21st century.

SOC/SWK 324 Social Science Statistics 3 credits

Designed to provide social and behavioral science majors with a fundamental understanding of what statistics are and how and why they are used in social scientific research. The focus is on gaining a working knowledge of “the big picture” associated with being a consumer of empirical research in an information age. In this context, this course emphasizes both theoretical and applied statistical analysis. Students explore the theory-research paradigm connected with all sciences, current issues in social science measurement, the basics of the normal curve, the role of populations, samples and sampling distributions in hypothesis testing, and key descriptive and inferential statistical techniques often used in both popular and social scientific literature.

SOC 329 Practices, Policies and Politics of Aging 3 credits

A focus on social, economic and health care policies associated with the aged in the United States. Students examine how these policies have impacted the relationship between and within the generations and how they will likely effect these generations in America’s future. Students also study the increasingly powerful impact the elderly are having as a demographic, economic and political subgroup. Emphasis is placed on consideration of future policies and practices that are necessary to address this growing population’s needs.

SOC 331 Applied Gerontology 3 credits

A seminar designed to be taken concurrently with the field practicum in social gerontology (SOC 332). This course applies the student’s theoretical knowledge of gerontology gained in previous courses to the actual provision of services to the elderly. The student’s experiences in the field are explored and integrated with theory. The course is sufficiently broad-based to address a variety of field placements. NOTE: This course does not count toward the sociology major. Prerequisite: BIO 107 or NUR 215, SOC 243, 329 and NTR 115. Co-requisite SOC 332.

SOC 332 Field Practice in Gerontology 3 credits

A 90-clock-hour experience in a professional setting in which services to the elderly are provided. Students select their own placements with faculty consultation and supervision of the practicum experience. This course is designed to be taken concurrently with Applied Gerontology (SOC 331) as the concluding course in the certificate program in gerontology. NOTE: This course does not count toward the sociology major. Prerequisite: BIO 107 or NUR 215, and SOC 243, 329 and NTR 115. Co-requisite: SOC 331.

SOC 360 and 361 Special Topics 2-3 credits each term

The topic for intensive study in this course is selected by participating faculty members and students.

SOC 390 Independent Study 1-3 credits

Consists of individual research, supervised readings, or projects carried out under supervision.

 

SPANISH COURSES

SPANISH PLACEMENT POLICY
1. Students who have had four years of successful language study in high school should be placed in the 300 level.
2. Students who have had three years of successful language study in high school and who desire to continue the study of the same language should be placed in the 200 level.
3. Students who have had two years of successful language study in high school and who desire to continue the study of the same language should be placed in the 102 section.
4. Students who have had one year of successful language study in high school and who desire to continue the study of the same language should be placed in the 101 section.
5. Students who have had no language study in high school must begin in the 101 section.
6. Students who want an exemption from this policy must take a placement test. Native speakers of Spanish and semi-native speakers of Spanish must also take the placement test.

Students who have earned an AP Exam grade of 4 or 5 are exempt from SPA 301 and will receive three credits toward the major or minor. They should begin study with 302 (and may concurrently take any courses above this number).

SPA 101 Introduction to Spanish I 3 credits

Introduces students to the essentials of Spanish with emphasis on learning to speak and to understand practical, conversational Spanish. The class prepares students for basic communication in Spanish.

SPA 102 Introduction to Spanish II 3 credits

A continuation of Spanish 101. Prerequisite: Spanish 101 or the equivalent.

SPA 120 Conversational Spanish for Business 3 credits

Develops the basic Spanish language skills required to interact in today’s business world. It provides the introduction to the major grammatical features of the Spanish language and the context of business, as well as essential business vocabulary.

SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I 3 credits

Students further their development of skills in reading, writing, speaking and understanding Spanish. This course also introduces students to aspects of Spanish culture.

SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II 3 credits

A continuation of Spanish 201, this course introduces students to Spanish literature. Prerequisite: Spanish 201 or the equivalent.

SPA 203 Spanish in the Workplace 3 credits

An intensive course designed to refine the student’s Spanish reading, translation, and communication skills in career/professional situations, and to give the student information on Hispanic business and commercial customs and practices.

SPA 205 Spanish for Health Professionals 3 credits

Designed to enrich students’ vocabulary with terms that can be used in the many careers related to health care or health and wellness. Much of the vocabulary is also appropriate for the layperson wishing greater facility with anatomical and other common medical terms in Spanish. The course will develop Spanish writing skills, grammar, and communicative ability in this context within the parameters of the online medium via assignments appropriate to the student’s individual skill level and professional interests (including but not limited to specialized vocabulary, letter and memo writing, interview skills, or interpretation). The course’s thematic focus is health issues as they pertain to Hispanic populations in the United States.

SPA 300 Linguistics and Translation 3 credits

Explores how lexicon, structure, and dialect change throughout the Hispanic world. We will study some of the issues inherent in Spanish spoken in the U.S.; issues of language contact and language mixture; facts about language learning and use, especially as they pertain to K-12 teaching of Spanish in the U.S.; linguistic terminology useful to non-linguists; techniques of literary translation (how to do it) and practicalities of translation (how to use the skill to enhance your career).

SPA 301 Conversation and Composition 3 credits

A study of vocabulary and idioms used in spoken Spanish with varied exercises to develop ease in writing. Special emphasis is placed on learning to communicate in situations of everyday life and the usage of specialized vocabulary. The student is introduced to Spanish-language resources available on the Internet.

SPA 302 Advanced Conversation and Composition 3 credits

Through individualized and guided conversation, students continue to acquire vocabulary, structures and idioms essential to ease in communication on the advanced level. This course includes intensive in-class practice in speaking through role-playing, debates, simulated interviews and discussions. Students learn to express themselves orally and in writing on a wide range of topics from current events to personal values.

SPA 303 and 304 Survey of Spanish Literature 3 credits each term

An overview of the richness and variety of Spanish literature. First semester: We journey from the fragmentary beginnings of Spanish literature in poetic folk songs through hero sagas, expressions of spirituality, comic plays, and parables of the wise, and end with the darkly comic classic novel in dialogue, La Celestina. Second semester: We discuss the impact of the Enlightenment in Spain and experience Galdos’s realism, Bécquer’s romanticism, and the moving poetry of the Generation of 1898, among other delights in the mature Spanish canon. We conclude our journey with the literature chronicling the devastating Spanish Civil War in the twentieth century, and examine the new directions Spanish literature has taken after the end of dictatorship and the restoration of the monarchy.

SPA 305 Survey of Latin-American Literature 3 credits

A study of the relationship between Spanish and Latin American Literature, the idea of colonial literature, and Latin-American literary identity. This course addresses how we read literature (especially literature of another culture/linguistic group), the relevance of literary analysis to a larger understanding of a particular person or society, and the applicability of that information in our own lives. Writers to be studied include Christopher Columbus, Simon Bolivar, José Martí, Ruben Darío, Gabriela Mistral, Octavio Paz, Gabriel García Márquez, Juan Rulfo, Julio Cortazar, Carlos Fuentes and Mario Vargas Llosa.

SPA 306 Seventeenth-Century Spanish Literature: The Golden Age 3 credits

An introduction to the glitter and the terror of the Spanish Golden Age, with all its artistic splendor, political intrigues and religious persecutions. Main themes of the course include the interconnectedness of literary development and political climate, the Spanish code of honor, and the role of women in Spanish Baroque society and literature. Writers include Cervantes, Calderón, Lope de Vega and Tirso de Molina.

SPA 310 Hispanic Women Writers 3 credits

A study of Hispanic women and their world(s) through the media of text, film and cybertext. Students read and write short stories (by, for and about women), hear the biography of Latina writers through the ages, discover and share information on prominent Latina figures available on the Internet, and participate in a classroom literary gathering. Emphasis is placed on living Latina writers and their perspectives, and how they relate to the Cedar Crest students’ experience as women.

SPA 309 Hispanic Culture and Civilization 3 credits

A study of the relationship between Spanish and Latin-American history, the idea of colonial culture, and Latin-American identity in the United States and the modern world. Students experience the culture by seeing Hispanic films and/or theatrical works as well as through readings.

SPA 312 Hispanic Popular Culture in the United States 3 credits

Explores in-depth the cultural variety of the Hispanic experience in the U.S., both as it exists currently and as it developed over the past five centuries. Students acquaint themselves with Latino history in the United States and better understand their evolving relationships with other ethnic groups. They also reflect upon the presence and portrayal of Hispanics in the U.S. film, television and other performing arts, and read literature written by U.S. Latinos and Latinas. We focus our inquiry particularly upon the Latino community of the Lehigh Valley.

SPA 313 Caribbean Literature 3 credits

Examines how the history and writings of the peoples of the Dominican Republic, Cuba, and Puerto Rico differ from those of other Latin American cultures (or non-Hispanic Caribbean cultures), and considers the historical, political and cultural factors that have shaped Caribbean literature. We will evaluate how we can characterize Cuban, Puerto Rican or Dominican identity based on the pictures conveyed in their literature, and explore some recurrent themes of Puerto Ricans, Dominican-Americans and Cuban-Americans writing in the U.S.

SPA 315 Topics in Hispanic Literature and Culture 3 credits

A variety of topics chosen by students and faculty for in-depth study. Selected topics include: introduction to literary analysis; the Spanish Civil War; the generation of 1898; contemporary Spanish and Latin-American literature; southern Mediterranean civilization; and literature of the conquistadores.

SPA 260 and 360 Special Topics 1-3 credits

Highlights special topics that are not covered by regular departmental offerings.

SPA 391 and 392 Independent Study 1-3 credits each term

Consists of individual projects. Students electing this course prepare a reading list and outline of the proposed project in consultation with a member of the department. Prerequisite: Permission of the department.

 

SPECIAL EDUCATION COURSES

SPE 243 The Exceptional Child 3 credits

Provides the prospective teacher with a functional understanding of the various types of exceptional children and legal responsibilities of teachers and school districts in regard to exceptional children. This introductory course will explore both special and regular education practices, and the impact these practices have on exceptional children, families, and educators within today’s society. Prerequisite: EDU 150.

SPE-310 Intensive Reading, Writing and Mathematics Intervention Approaches 3 credits

Students will be provided an overview of research-based practices that offer intensive reading, writing, and math interventions designed for students who do not respond to the core curriculum. This course includes a review of the Response to Intervention (RtI) framework, diagnostic assessment methods, progress monitoring, and research-based instructional strategies that support reading, writing, and math standards. This course will review the neurophysiological causes of dyslexia, dysgraphia, and math disabilities and effective supporting interventions. In addition, the course will address principals and standards of reading and math instruction as identified by the National Reading Panel and the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) respectively. (Prerequisites: EDU-150 and SPE 243)

SPE 315 Teaching Students with Pervasive Developmental Disorders 3 credits

Students will explore the communication and social and relationship issues faced by individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and investigate the best practices and programs for increasing academic achievement for students on the spectrum. This course will discuss issues of identification, placement, and evidence-based approaches instructional strategies found effective for students with ASD. This course includes the major theoretical perspectives of applied behavior analysis, developmental and social-relational approaches, and the theoretical approach of TEACCH. (Prerequisite SPE 243)

SPE 320 Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities 3 credits

Participants in this course will be provided an overview of the impact of specific learning disabilities (SLD) on school-age children. Children with SLD are average to above average intelligence and exhibit specific learning impairments. This course will explore the diagnostic process to determine SLD and specific research-based remedial techniques to support the SLD learner. (Prerequisite SPE 243)

SPE 342 Middle Level Field Experience IV 1 credit

Students will spend 30 hours per semester in inclusive education classrooms. Emphasis will be placed on application of content learned in SPE –344, including examining content, using effective teaching strategies, and adaptation and modification of instructional plans. A college supervisor will maintain contact with the cooperating teacher. Co-requisite SPE 344

SPE 333 Screening, Assessment, and IEP Develpment for Teachers 3 credits

Designed to provide a thorough review of theories and techniques of educational and psychological testing as applied to the educational setting, this course offers students the opportunity to understand and interpret basic psychometric principles that apply to psychological, educational, and diagnostic assessments. This course will offer the opportunity for educators to explore the administration, scoring, and interpretation procedures used in a psycho-educational battery; understand the ethical standards for use and administration; and be able to both interpret and contribute to the psycho-educational process. Students will have a functional understanding of “Response to Intervention” practices and be able to identify the reliability and validity constructs as they pertain to student assessments.

SPE 344 Adaptations, Modifications, and Assistive Technology for the Exceptional Child 3 credits

Today’s educational world is inclusive and diverse. This course will introduce educators to the range of expectations required to accommodate the special education and Section 504 qualifying students. Historical and legal aspects of special education will be reviewed including the evaluation and individual educational plan process. Research-based practices to support students with high and low incidence disabilities will be explored through journal reviews. Students will design, modify lesson plans, and prepare a research review in an area of linked interest to this course. Prerequisite: SPE 243 and EDU 150.

SPE 345 Field Experience IV 1 credit

Prospective teachers spend three hours per week in an inclusive elementary, middle, or secondary classroom. Emphasis is placed on observation and participation related to the application and content in SPE 344, including examining curricula content, effective teaching strategies, collaboration, adaptations and modifications. Students will observe the implementation of IEPs under the supervision of a cooperating mentor teacher. Students will also participate in four class sessions to process the field experience and discuss related research studies related to inclusion. Students will respond to guided questions through the development of a comprehensive journal related to their Field Experience. Co-requisite: SPE 243.

SPE 346 Collaborative Partnerships in Inclusive Settings (PK-8) 3 credits

This course explores the collaborative practices of teamwork that facilitates inclusive practices in the classroom through hands-on, interactive activities. Students are introduced to best practice strategies. They will build collaborative skills, models of co-teaching structures, communication patterns and strategic planning. Students will also implement models of collaboration that will enhance the participation of special education students within the general education environment. Prerequisite: SPE 344.

SPE 347 Classroom Management 3 credits

Intrinsic to a well-run classroom is a classroom based on the theoretical constructs of a positive behavior support plan. This course focuses on school-wide, classroom, and individual behavioral approaches appropriate for the regular and special education environments. Emphasis will be placed on the participant’s understanding of “personal fit” which matches one’s core philosophy to theories of: rules and consequences, confronting and contracting, and relationships and listening. Seminal work of renowned theorists will be explored while participants conclude their study by designing a system that addresses: limit setting, administrative backup systems, incentives, encouragement systems, and management and classroom structures that are supported in research-based practices.

SPE 348 Teaching Students with Low Incidence Disabilities 3 credits

Prospective teachers are provided with an overview of classification, learning characteristics, and research-based strategies relevant to the education of students with moderate to severe disabilities. Emphasis is on assessing, planning instruction, and implementing a functional curriculum for students with significant cognitive delays and multiple disabilities. Students will review and summarize a series of journal articles that highlight peer-reviewed, research-based practices to support students with low incidence disabilities.

SPE 350 Teaching Students with Behavioral Challenges 3 credits

Students will learn about the impact of learning and behavioral exceptionalities and how to plan and adapt instructional strategies to enhance effective learning through constructs of applied behavioral analysis. The course will focus on historical perspective, legal procedures and responsibilities, and implementing behavioral approaches in a diagnostic-prescriptive format. Case-scenario instruction will offer a problem solving approach so students develop a repository of viable strategies based on research-based designs. Prerequisite: SPE 243.

SPE 375 Practicum in Special Education 3 credits

Students spend half of the semester working with professional in a special education classroom. Weekly observations and conferencing with a college supervisor foster the development of the knowledge base and skills acquired in SPE 346, 347, 348, and 350. There is a $150.00 cooperating mentor teacher honorarium charged for this course.

*The Director of Student Teaching and Field Experiences arranges intern assignments well in advance. The student should, therefore, check with his/her advisor during the junior year to obtain the due date for intern applications [see page 85 of this catalog]. The intern teacher is responsible for transportation arrangements and expenses in getting to the assigned practicum site. During the Spring Term, the intern teacher will be expected to teach during the College Spring Break. If a student is a resident student, she may remain in the residence hall but will be responsible for her own meals.

 

SPECIAL STUDIES COURSES

SPS 160 Exploring Your Future .5 credit

Designed to help students develop an understanding of the career decision-making process, to assist students with choosing a major and putting their career plan into action. Students learn how to evaluate their goals, interests, values and strengths, how to conduct research on majors and careers, prepare and build a resume, and effectively explore career and internship opportunities. Students are involved in hands-on projects and activities such as taking self-assessment tests, conducting informational interviews, using the Internet, and preparing a resume. This course is designed for freshman or sophomore level students and is offered in the second seven weeks of the fall semester.

SPS 170/171 Understanding and Using APA Editorial Style 1 credit

Students will learn to employ APA for their social science writing. Prerequisite: Successful completion of the WRI-1 requirement; sophomore standing recommended.

SPS 200 Launching a Career Search 1 credit

An introduction to career planning through discussions on topics such as values, skills and interests as they related to resume and cover-letter writing, interviewing techniques, job search strategies and choosing an employer. Mock interviews, self-assessment exercises, and group discussions help students realize what to expect and how to prepare for the job market. Using the Internet in a job search also is addressed. This course is offered in the spring semester.

SPS 270 Internship Program 3-6 credits

Over 300 internships are available in local, national and international companies from accounting to zoology. The internship program is a practical supplement to classroom education under the supervision of a faculty supervisor, on-site supervisor and the director of career planning. Students may receive 3-6 credits for each individual internship and can accumulate up to 12 internship credits during the course of their college career. The program is open to all full-time traditional and lifelong learning students who have completed 60 credits. Transfer students must complete at least one semester at Cedar Crest College to be eligible for an internship. Students must have at least a 2.0 cumulative grade-point average to be eligible for an internship. Additional information regarding the procedures and requirements of the internship program are contained in the “internship guidelines” obtainable at the career planning office as well as on the career planning homepage.

 

THEATRE AND SPEECH COURSES

THS 100 Experiencing Theatre 3 credits

A hands-on course that examines the roles of the actor, director, designer and playwright in the collaborative process of theatre production. Students explore the various skills, talents and perspectives required to stage a play. Examination of specific times in theatrical history are discussed to further the student’s contextual understanding of Theatre. The course culminates in a final production of several one act plays with each student assigned a specific role as well as trips to see Theatre locally and in New York.

THS 105 Public Speaking 3 credits

The handling of various speaking situations through practical speech preparation, from interviews and group discussions to formal platform speaking, is covered. Additional emphasis is placed on voice and diction.

THS 106 Forensic Speech Team 1 credit

Participation in forensics competition including public speaking and oral interpretation events. Students work with instructors and fellow team members to develop speech and oral interpretation skills. Students meet weekly and train for regional competitions throughout the semester. Students are expected to prepare for and compete in at least two tournaments per term.

THS 109 Prose & Poetry: Oral Interpretation 3 credits

Active participation is required in reading works of literature, prose and poetry aloud in class. Students develop their ability to share the rhythm and natural music of selected pieces. This course is an excellent confidence-builder for people who must speak to large groups or for actors working on vocal control and expression.

THS 150 Stagecraft 3 credits

Stagecraft is a course designed to introduce students to the materials and techniques used in the backstage production of a play. It is a lab oriented course which explores production areas such as scenery construction, lighting and sound.

THS 201 Beginning Acting 3 credits

A basic acting course that uses games, improvisations as well as individual and group exercises to introduce the student to the acting process. In a supportive and non-competitive environment, the student explores relationships to character and process and examines the specific elements needed to create a stage life. Scene and monologue work is assigned and is sequential in nature, leading the student to and through a deeper level of work.

THS 202 Acting II 3 credits

Continues the student’s investigation in exercise and scene work. It is progressive. The student moves into more advanced exercise and scene work. The theatrical literature that is explored include Ibsen, Shaw, O’Neill, Chekov, Williams and others as the student’s skill and talent are defined and matured. Prerequisite: THS 201.

THS 227 Advanced Public Speaking 3 credits

Individual speaking styles are developed through major oral presentations. Students examine rhetorical theory and evaluate historical and contemporary speeches. Prerequisite: THS 105.

THS 231 History of Theatre: Ancients to 17th Century 3 credits

A survey of dramatic literature and historical influences. Course content includes extensive play-reading and analyses of periods and style. No pre-requisite.

THS 232 History of Theatre: 18th Century - 1950 3 credits

A survey of dramatic literature and historical influences. Course content includes extensive play reading and analysis of periods and style. No pre-requisite.

THS 233 Reading Roundtable 1 credit

Theatre majors are required to complete four semesters of Reading Roundtable. The purpose of the course is to expose students to contemporary works of dramatic literature each term through a group staged reading format. Class meets weekly for one hour.

THS 240 Design for the Stage 3 credits

The various areas of theatrical design (set design and construction, costuming, lighting history and design) are topics offered in a studio/lecture format. No prerequisite.

THS 250 Production 1 credit

One credit per show toward graduation may be earned by dancing, acting, designing, choreographing or stage-managing for faculty-directed theatre productions. This course may be repeated.

THS 251 Practicum 1 credit

One credit per production toward graduation may be earned by completing practical application projects relevant to faculty-directed or choreographed productions in the area of sets, lights or costumes. Requirements include a minimum of 40 hours of supervised activity in a specific theatre shop, backstage or on a technical production crew or relevant to the production of a dance event. Permission of the instructor is required. This course may be repeated.

THS 260 Special Topics in Theatre 3 credits

THS 270 History of Fashion 3 credits

A survey of the history of fashion from the ancients to the 21st Century.

THS 301 Directing I 3 credits

A beginning course that introduces the student to the role and responsibilities of the director in theatrical collaboration. Exploration of artistic vision, working with actors, play analysis, stage movement, style and interpretive choices are all examined in modern and contemporary plays. Individual scenes are chosen and the course culminates in the student’s direction of a one act play. Prerequisites: THS 100 and THS 201.

THS 302 Directing Tutorial 3 credits

Advanced projects in directing. Prerequisite: THS 301 and permission of instructor.

THS 303 Acting Methods 3 credits

An advanced acting seminar that individualizes the student’s progress. Specific problem areas, such as voice, language, audition techniques, style, as well as group issues, such as resumes, stage make-up, audition material and interviews are addressed and examined. Prerequisites: THS 201-202.

THS 335 Creative Drama in Education 3 credits

Open to all students. The course is designed to demonstrate through theory and experimental projects the uses and implementation of creative drama in any elementary or secondary school curriculum. Practical application to unit planning is stressed. Prerequisites:

THS 100 and 201 or declared education major.

THS 340 Design Tutorial 1-3 credits

Advanced study in specific design areas. Prerequisite: Junior standing, THS 240, and permission of instructor.

THS 390 Independent Study 1-3 credits

Junior status and a declared theatre major are required.

 

Writing COURSES

WRI 001 College Writing Studio 1 credit

College Writing Studio is a supplemental writing lab taken concurrently with WRI-1 courses, providing extended workshop time and basic instruction in grammar, sentence and paragraph structures, and essay coherence. Students are recommended for placement in the studio based upon college entrance examination scores and WRI-1 writing samples. Graded Pass/Fail.

WRI 100 College Writing 3 credits

Instruction in the college writing process, with intensive practice in writing clear, logical, and persuasive prose, stressing focus, content, organization, style and conventions in argument. Students must pass with a final grade of “C” to fulfill the liberal arts curriculum requirements. Students must complete WRI 100 or HON 122 before taking all 200- and 300-level ENG courses, with the exception of ENG 201, 205, 220, 223, 225, and 280.

 

Last Updated: 12/3/10