Graduate Catalog • 2011-2012

Graduate Education Courses

ECE 501 Foundations for Early Childhood Education - 3 credits

This graduate level course provides an in-depth study and analysis of the field of early childhood education with an intense focus on historical, social and philosophical background. The course content includes an exploration of current and future critical issues. The student will discuss and implement developmentally appropriate practices, current teaching trends, and best practices as defined by national professional organization principles and standards. The role of the family in early childhood education is highlighted.

ECE 502 Assessment and Intervention: PreK-4 - 3 credits

Designed for the graduate level student, this course prepares the Early Childhood Educator to develop appropriate assessment tools for grades Pre-K to 4. The student will explore how these assessments evaluate children’s competencies in relation to state standards. The student will also develop an extensive understanding of how assessment guides instruction in the early learning environment. Students will interpret and create both summative and formative assessments.

ECE 505 Issues and Advocacy in Early Childhood Education - 3 credits

This course is designed for the graduate level student seeking initial certification or to enhance skills in the early childhood profession. The student will explore and reflect on the ethical and professional responsibilities of the early childhood profession. This course provides an overview of critical issues in early childhood education and focuses on the importance of developing collaborative family and community partnerships. Students in this course will develop problem solving strategies and the expertise to become a reflective decision maker and advocate for families of students with and without exceptional learning needs. Focus will be on establishing and sustaining partnerships with families and linking families to appropriate community resources. In addition, the student will review research conducted in this field.

EDU 540 Differentiated Reading Instruction - 3 credits

This course is designed for the graduate level student seeking initial certification or teachers seeking to extend their knowledge in the area of reading instruction. The early childhood educator will learn to differentiate instruction for the PreK through Grade 4 classroom setting. A primary focus is on current intervention strategies that meet the needs of all students in the areas of reading, writing, and assessment. The student will examine how reading research and theory meet to develop strong differentiated instructional strategies. Students are encouraged to participate in national, state and local organizations that promote reading for all learners.
Corequisite EDU 511

EDU 530 Teaching Methods for Early Childhood Education I: Content Areas - 3 credits

This course is designed to meet the needs of graduate level students seeking initial certification in Early Childhood education (Pre-K to 4). Students are exposed to the various methodologies to successfully teach science, math, social studies and beyond. Students will explore the constructivist theory and model for teaching these subjects. Students will learn to integrate subjects, create hands on activities, and teach children through a challenging curriculum. National and PDE standards are used extensively for curriculum and assessment development. Each subject is addressed in the context of best instructional practices for that discipline.

EDU 531 Teaching Methods for Early Childhood Education II: A Model for Integration - 3 credits

This course is designed to meet the needs of graduate level students seeking initial certification in Early Childhood education (Pre-K to 4). As an extension to ECE 530, students in this course will continue to examine the early childhood curriculum and develop ways to integrate learning for their students. Students will examine their own philosophy of early childhood education and how it relates to the integration of all subjects (language arts, science, mathematics, social studies, arts and humanities, health, movement and nutrition). Students will build on the knowledge gained in earlier coursework to create an integrated teaching unit for the early childhood classroom.
Prerequisite EDU 530

EDU 500 American Education - 3 credits

An examination of the most pressing policy issues confronting elementary and secondary education as seen from the perspective of the socio-economic, political and legal frameworks within which teachers teach. Topics include academic standards and assessment, school choice, educational technologies, character education, school finance, and the civil rights of students. Particular attention is devoted to the debate over the purposes of education in an era of globalization and the governance issues raised by the standards-based reform movement in American education.

EDU 501 Educational Psychology - 3 credits

An advanced survey of the historical and contemporary uses of psychology within the Education profession, and how an understanding of Educational psychology can enhance professional practice. Topics addressed include behavioral psychology, motivation, and learning theory. Additional emphasis is placed on multicultural and special education issues as they relate to learning and behavior. Students will conduct original research in this course.

EDU 505 Law and Policy in American Education - 3 credits

An analysis of the legal frameworks within which teachers teach. Primary attention is devoted to federal and state laws which serve to define the legal rights and responsibilities of teachers. Topics include academic freedom, due process rights, liability, special education, free speech rights, collective bargaining and personnel issues, civil rights issues, and religion.

EDU 508 Integrating the Arts Across the Curriculum - 3 credits

This course prepares elementary and middle school teachers to integrate music, visual arts and movement/dance across the academic content areas. Emphasis is placed on fostering creativity as well as adapting learning experiences in the arts for exceptional students and ELL students. A module on physical education is included in the content of this course. Practical application to unit planning and the proposed PA Standards for the Arts are stressed.
Prerequisite: EDU 550.

EDU 509 Educational Philosophy and Ethics - 3 credits

Graduate students will explore contemporary and historical approaches to teaching and learning in American education. The major philosophical positions that guide current and past practice will be examined and students will be required to place their own philosophical ideologies within the context of philosophy. Students will also examine how philosophy is an integral part of educational research.

EDU 511 Literacy I - 3 credits

In this course the student will develop an understanding of the major theoretical models of reading, writing, listening, and speaking in Grades K-3 in an effort to practice such models in the classroom. Prospective students develop competencies for the implementation of emergent and developmental literacy using a balanced literacy model as described in the No Child Left Behind initiative. Students will be expected to analyze research and write literary reviews on current conceptual models of literacy.

EDU 512 Literacy II - 3 credits

This course is designed to provide prospective elementary and middle school teachers with the knowledge and competencies to plan, implement, and assess literacy curriculum and learning experiences grounded in the PDE Standards for Speaking, Listening, Reading, and Writing, and to become effective agents for social and policy change in literacy education. Prospective teachers will acquire an understanding of the works from various literary genres as the basis for the developmental reading/language arts curriculum in grades 4-8 with the particular focus on the use of Literature Circles. Prospective teachers will apply their knowledge of theories and research on literacy to develop learning experiences to foster reading comprehension, critical thinking, problem solving, language arts skills, reading in the academic content areas, media literacy, and appreciation of human diversity. They will also develop competence in the integration of literacy skills across the other academic areas. This course includes intensive analysis of traditional and modern works of child and adolescent literature with an emphasis on the development of critical literacy. Diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties are introduced.
Prerequisite: EDU 511

EDU 513 Reading and Language Arts - 3 credits

This course is designed to provide elementary and middle school teachers (K-6) the knowledge and competencies to plan, implement, and assess emergent and developmental literacy instruction. PDE Standards for Reading, Writing, Speaking, and Listening; The Balanced Literacy Model; Children’s literature of various genres will be read and used to model comprehension strategy instruction. Current research articles will be included. Teachers will develop skills to assist students in their classrooms to become strategic and critical readers.
Prerequisite: EDU 550.

EDU 514 Reading in the Content Areas - 3 credits

Students in this course will examine best teaching practices for supporting students in the reading of content area texts. Students participating in this course will gain expertise in the strategies that increase comprehension skills for content area reading. In addition students will learn to extend content area learning through the integration of adolescent literature. A review of research of the current trends in adolescent reading is a component of this course.
Prerequisite: EDU 550.

EDU 516 Diversity and Critical Pedagogy - 3 credits

Students will explore instructional and political issues related to race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, etc. as they impact student learning and educational experiences and the American education system toward developing personal sensitivity and appreciation of diversity as well as a sense of their own voice as education professionals. Critical theory and more specifically strategies and approaches for facilitating a critical literacy in students grades K-12 will be a focus of this course.

EDU 517 Curriculum, Assessment and Learning Experiences for Science in K-6 - 3 credits

Students are exposed to the various methodologies to successfully teach science to elementary students, integrating hands on activities, challenging extensions to standard lessons/activities, and an extensive introduction to the family of calculators, CBL2, and Vernier sensors to collect real data for the above activities. This course requires an extensive review of science concepts that relate to the many science misconceptions held by elementary students. Considerable emphasis is placed on the review of current research in peer reviewed journals and active participation in on line and class discussions. This course is WEB Enhanced utilizing eCollege and current membership in NSTA and on line access is required.
Prerequisite: EDU 550.

EDU 518 Curriculum, Assessment and Learning Experiences for Social Studies in the Elementary & Middle Schools - 3 credits

This course prepares the prospective teacher to develop and implement learning experiences and assessments based on the PDE standards and current research in the field of education. Emphasis is placed on conceptualizing the social studies as a keystone for the integration of all subjects. Students will be expected to plan, model, and reflect upon their teaching.
Prerequisite: EDU 550.

EDU 520 Pre-Student Teaching Field Experiences - 1 credit

Graduate students will observe and participate in an elementary or secondary school classroom. Meetings with the instructor during the semester provides the prospective teacher with the opportunity for analysis and synthesis of field experiences. The student will complete 90 - 190 observational hours. The number of hours are determined by PDE requirements and graduation date.

EDU 525 Evaluating Educational Research - 3 credits

An introduction to the art and science of research design and methodology – that integrates both qualitative and quantitative research methods. Special emphasis is given to the nature of the successful interview for mixed studies. Literature review, sampling techniques, data collection, and analysis of appropriate data share equal importance. Three drafts of the research proposal are submitted and reviewed by the instructor and the second draft is peer reviewed. The final draft is expected to be of superior quality and a scholarly foundation for a potential Master Thesis. This course is enhanced with on line educational experiences utilizing eCollege.

EDU 532 Curriculum, Assessment and Learning Experiences for Elementary and Middle School Mathematics - 3 credits

Students are exposed to the various methodologies to successfully teach mathematics to elementary students, integrating hands on activities with various manipulative and challenging extensions to standard lessons. A current membership in the NCTM is suggested. Considerable emphasis is placed on the review of current research in peer review journals.
Prerequisites: MAT 202 and EDU 550

EDU 535 Creative Drama in the Classroom - 3 credits

This course is designed to demonstrate through a review of theory/research and experimental projects the uses, planning and implementation of creative drama in a wide variety of ways in the elementary, middle school and secondary school classroom. Practical application to unit planning and the proposed PA Standards for the Arts are stressed.
Prerequisite: EDU 550.

EDU 546 Curriculum, Assessment and Learning Experiences for Secondary Science and Mathematics - 3 credits

Students are exposed to the various methodologies to successfully teach mathematics and science to secondary students, integrating hands on activities with various manipulatives, challenging extensions to standard lessons/activities, and an extensive introduction to TI84 family of graphing calculators, CBL2, and Vernier sensors to collect real data for the above activities. A membership in the NCTM or NSTA and on line access is required. Online discussions and in class discussions are focused on articles from the NCTM, NSTA, and JRST journals. Considerable emphasis is placed on the review of current research in peer reviewed journals. This course is web enhanced with on line educational experiences utilizing eCollege.
Prerequisites: MAT 202 and EDU 550.

EDU 547 Curriculum, Assessment and Learning Experiences for Secondary Citizenship and Social Studies - 3 credits

Prepares prospective secondary and middle school teachers to design, implement, and assess learning experiences that foster the development of competencies outlined in state and national standards that guide the discipline. A strong emphasis is placed on students’ ability to plan, model, and reflect upon their teaching. Students will engage in action research as well as develop skills to be intelligent consumers of research.
Prerequisite: EDU 514.

EDU 548 Curriculum, Assessment and Learning Experiences for Secondary English - 3 credits

Prepares prospective secondary and middle school teachers to design, implement, and assess learning experiences that foster the development of competencies outlined in state and national standards that guide the discipline. A strong emphasis is placed on students’ ability to plan, model, and reflect upon their teaching. Students will engage in action research as well as develop skills to be intelligent consumers of research.
Prerequisite: EDU 514.

EDU 549 Curriculum, Assessment and Learning Experiences for World Languages - 3 credits

Prepares prospective secondary and middle school teachers to design, implement, and assess learning experiences that foster the development of competencies outlined in state and national standards that guide the discipline. A strong emphasis is placed on students’ ability to plan, model, and reflect upon their teaching. Students will engage in action research as well as develop skills to be intelligent consumers of research.
Prerequisite: EDU 514

EDU 550 Educational Planning - 3 credits

This course will prepare prospective teachers to design a cohesive unit plan so that they will be able to demonstrate the application and implementation of lesson planning based upon effective teaching methods grounded in research. The course will also provide prospective teachers with an understanding of principles of curriculum, instructional strategies, assessment, and classroom management as they relate to teaching and learning. All students are required to read and critique several assigned scholarly reviews. This assignment will culminate in a formally typed paper and oral presentation.

EDU 555 Developing Cultural Awareness and Sensitivity - 3 credits

Students will study the relationship between cultures, multicultural education, and effective teaching strategies for all students. This course will prepare educators to create an environment that will be cultural sensitive and support varied instructional approaches. It will include a study of knowledge, skills, and strategies that enable teachers to facilitate learning for students from diverse cultural and linguistic backgrounds.

EDU 556 Second Language Acquisition and Language Development - 3 credits

This course will provide education practitioners with an awareness of the process of language acquisition for first and second languages both in terms of the theoretical background and in terms of the practical application in the classroom. Cognitive stages of language development, basic linguistics, and the structure of English will be introduced. Practitioners will develop competency in the integration of TESOL and PDE standards in speaking, listening, reading, and writing as well as instructional and assessment strategies to successfully increase English language learners L2 competency. Course goals will be achieved through class lecture, discussion, research, presentations, and practical application projects.

EDU 558 Approaches to Educating ELL’s - 3 credits

This course offers educational practitioners a survey of the major approaches to teaching different types of English language learners in terms of method, instructional strategies, assessment. The practical application of research including adapting materials, assessment and evaluation techniques, and access to student/teacher resources will be the primary focus of the course. These topics and other issues faced by ESL teachers and learners will be addressed in a multicultural context with the goal to develop competency in the integration of TESOL and PDE standards in the classroom. This course is designed for master’s level education students and other education practitioners. Course content will be covered through lecture, discussion, student facilitation, practical application projects, and research.

EDU 559 Curriculum, Assessment and Instruction Strategies for Teaching Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Students - 3 credits

This course prepares the teacher to adapt learning experiences to meet the needs of students who are nonnative speakers of English or students who are from a cultural heritage other than American to provide equal educational opportunity for these students. Students will be exposed to research on second language development, intercultural communication, fostering English language development and academic content learning simultaneously, facilitating acculturation and social integration of CLD students. Major emphasis is placed on the development of the prospective teachers’ respect and appreciation for heritage culture and language.
Prerequisite: EDU 550.

EDU 560 Special Topics in Education - 3 credits

The focus of this course will vary for the purpose of allowing students to study critical issues in the field not covered in detail in other graduate courses.

EDU 572 Student Teaching: Elementary School (Capstone Experience) - 3 credits

The student will spend the entire semester in a full-time experience in K-6 classrooms partnering elementary and middle schools under the guidance of a mentor teacher and a supervisor from the college. Prospective teachers receive daily feedback on the mastery of professional education competencies from the cooperating mentor teacher and weekly feedback from observation by the college supervisor.

EDU 573 Student Teaching: Secondary Schools - 3 credits

The student will spend the entire semester in a full-time partnering middle and high schools under the guidance of a mentor teacher and a supervisor from the college. Prospective teachers receive daily feedback on the mastery of professional education competencies from the cooperating mentor teacher and weekly feedback from observation by the college supervisor.

EDU 574 Professional Education Seminar (Capstone Experience) - 3 credits

Co-requisite is EDU-572. The course parallels student teaching (EDU-572 or EDU-573), and will meet one evening weekly during that experience. Major topics will include interpersonal and interracial relations, measurement and evaluation, technology, motivation and discipline, interview techniques and subjects of current interest and value. A variety of speakers address the national and state implications for education, strategic planning, discipline in the classroom, and IST programs. A portfolio will be developed as the culminating project.

EDU 590 Independent Study in Learning or Teaching - 3 credits

This course is designed for a student who wants to pursue an in-depth study of a specific topic in learning or teaching and culminates in a publishable scholarly article or research study.

EDU 599 Thesis or Capstone Application Project - 3 credits

The students will design and conduct a quantitative or qualitative research study or program evaluation under the guidance of a faculty thesis director and a committee of at least two other faculty.

REA 503 - Reading: Past, Present, and Future - 3 credits

This course is designed to guide the student-practitioner in an examination of issues that are based on foundational models of reading and current issues and questions in literacy education. Multiple perspectives based on published qualitative and quantitative research are examined. Students will be expected to demonstrate a critical analysis of the important theoretical models. Scientific evidence-based reading research by the International Reading Association and the National Reading Panel will be the basis for many discussions. Hot topics and current trends in reading research will be addressed. Classroom-based assignments will focus on the extent to which academic perspectives, public opinions, and educational policies are congruent or incongruent with the students’ own professional knowledge base. This course was designed to meet the five standards indicated by the International Reading Association: Foundational Knowledge, Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Materials, Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation, Creating a Literate Environment, and Professional Development.

REA 504: Diagnosis, Assessment, and Remedial Reading Techniques - 3 credits

This course is an introduction to classroom-based reading assessments. Participants develop expertise in both formal and informal reading assessments that are used to measure student achievement in grades kindergarten through 12. Educators will analyze the validity and reliability of assessment and intervention techniques that are used to accelerate the reading ability of students with reading deficiencies and/or disabilities. Educators will learn how to differentiate instruction to accommodate the needs of students whom vary in their levels of reading achievement. This course was designed to meet the five standards indicated by the International Reading Association: Foundational Knowledge, Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Materials, Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation, Creating a Literate Environment, and Professional Development.

REA 505 Word Study and Vocabulary Development - 3 credits

This course explores the acquisition of word knowledge for students in PreK-grade 12. Course content combines theory with practice as educators learn to use hands-on techniques to design tasks for developmental needs in phonemic awareness, alphabetical principle, phonics, word family instruction, spelling patterns, and word study in PreK through Grade 4. This course investigates phonemic, morphemic, semantic, syntactic, and pragmatic systems of language. Furthermore, vocabulary development is investigated in Grades 4-12 which teaches direct instruction of vocabulary and explores numerous strategies to enhance vocabulary growth. This course was designed to meet the five standards indicated by the International Reading Association: Foundational Knowledge, Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Materials, Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation, Creating a Literate Environment, and Professional Development.

REA 506: Literacy Coaching - 3 credits

As the last class before Practicum work, this course focuses on the reading professional and his/her ability to improve instruction through focused work with regular classroom teachers. These educators function to plan, model, observe, and provide feedback. Methods of providing professional development will be addressed. Course content will discuss The No Child Left Behind Initiative and its essential components. Educators will learn leadership skills to effectively communicate with colleagues at the building and administrative levels. This course is strictly hands-on and will use “modeling” as a means to learn by example. This course was designed to meet the five standards indicated by the International Reading Association: Foundational Knowledge, Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Materials, Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation, Creating a Literate Environment, and Professional Development.
Prerequisites: EDU 513, EDU 514, REA 503, REA 504, REA 505

REA 507: Reading Clinic Practicum: Early and Elementary Experience - 3 credits

All students seeking certification must participate in this field/practicum experience that is designed as a clinical experience in diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties under the supervision of a certified reading specialist. This experience will emphasize the importance of developing appropriate and practical techniques that will meet the needs of students in the elementary grades (K-6) with specific reading difficulties. Students are required to log a minimum of 50 hours. Students will develop a sense of integrity and ethical behavior, professional conduct as stated in the Pennsylvania Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators and other important regulations. This course was designed to meet the five standards indicated by the International Reading Association: Foundational Knowledge, Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Materials, Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation, Creating a Literate Environment, and Professional Development.

REA 508: Reading Clinic Practicum: Middle and High School Experience - 3 credits

Students can opt for this practicum experience or that of the Leadership practicum (REA 508 OR REA 509). This course is designed as a clinical experience in diagnosis and remediation of reading difficulties under the supervision of a certified reading specialist. This experience will emphasize the importance of developing appropriate and practical techniques that will meet the needs of students in the secondary grades (7-12) with specific reading difficulties. Students are required to log a minimum of 50 hours. Students will develop a sense of integrity and ethical behavior, professional conduct as stated in the Pennsylvania Code of Professional Practice and Conduct for Educators and other important regulations. This course was designed to meet the five standards indicated by the International Reading Association: Foundational Knowledge, Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Materials, Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation, Creating a Literate Environment, and Professional Development.

REA 509: Leadership as the Reading Professional - 3 credits

Students can opt for this experience or that of Middle/High School experience (REA 508 OR REA 509). This practicum experience is designed to connect practice to theoretical knowledge and allows students to maintain the leadership role that underlies their position of a reading educator within a school. Students will learn various ways to implement the role of the prospective reading professional as an effective leader of the future who serves as a role model for others. The practicum experience will examine the International Reading Association’s Standards for Reading Professionals as they address expectations for the leadership role. This course was designed to meet the five standards indicated by the International Reading Association: Foundational Knowledge, Instructional Strategies and Curriculum Materials, Assessment, Diagnosis, and Evaluation, Creating a Literate Environment, and Professional Development.

SPE 520 Teaching Students with Learning Disabilities

Design for the graduate level student this course will teach candidates to use PA Academic Standards and information from formative, summative and local assessments to design instruction for students with specific learning disabilities (SLD). This course will explore the diagnostic process and research-based instructional strategies to support all learners, including the SLD learner. Students will apply assessment data to lesson planning, re-teaching, and unit planning. Emphasis will be placed on educating students in the least restrictive environment with collaborative teaming among professionals. This course will guide students through the most current issues and research-based strategies. Students will also review research conducted in this area.

SPE 533 Psycho-Educational Testing for Teachers - 3 credits

The goal of this course is to develop a functional understanding of the theories and techniques of education and psychological testing as applied to the educational setting. Students will develop skills needed to be a contributing member of a multi-disciplinary team. This course offers students the opportunity to understand and interpret psychometric principles that apply to psychological, educational, and diagnostic assessments. Students will: explore the administration, scoring, and interpretation procedures used in a psycho-educational battery; understand the ethical standards for use and administration; and be able to both interpret and contribute to the psycho-educational process. Students will have a functional understanding of “Response to Intervention” practices and be able to identify the reliability and validity constructs as they pertain to student assessments. Students will analyze scenarios, interpret research studies and journal references, demonstrate content competencies through evaluations, and demonstrate understanding of legal responsibilities via classroom presentations.

SPE 544 Adaptations, Modifications, and Assistive Technology for the Exceptional Child - 3 credits

Today’s educator must be prepared to support a diverse inclusive environment. This course will explore adaptations and modifications used within the general education curriculum, and technology to support students with disabilities. Historical and legal aspects of special education will be reviewed including the evaluation and individual educational plan process. Research-based practices to support students with high and low incidence disabilities will be investigated through journal reviews. Students will design and modify lesson plans, and prepare an action research proposal, which includes a thorough literature review, in an area of interest linked to this course. In addition, students are required to collaboratively plan and present assigned topics relevant to this course content.

SPE 546 Collaborative Partnerships in Inclusive Settings - 3 credits

This course explores the collaborative practices of teamwork that facilitates the inclusive classroom through hands-on, interactive activities. Students are introduced to best practice strategies, collaborative/team-building skills, models of co-teaching structures, communication patterns, strategic planning, and implementation models of collaboration. These strategies will enhance the participation of special education students within the general education environment. Students are required to interpret and critique research articles, complete self-evaluations of their own leadership style, use nominal group techniques to move the group toward consensus, and apply scenario activities to practice conflict management skills. The course will provide the participant a functional understanding of organization change and the tools to facilitate productive outcomes. Student evaluations, assignments and activities will allow the participant the opportunity demonstrate their competencies in collaborative partnership understanding.

SPE 547 Classroom Management - 3 credits

Intrinsic to a well-run classroom is a classroom based on the theoretical constructs of a positive behavior support plan. This course focuses on school-wide, classroom, and individual behavioral approaches appropriate for the regular and special education environments. Emphasis will be placed on the participant’s understanding of “personal fit” which matches one’s core philosophy to theories of: rules and consequences; confronting and contracting; and relationships and listening. Seminal work of renowned theorists will be explored, e.g., F. Jones, Canter, Glasser, K. Rogers, etc., as well as behavioral and reinforcement strategies. Participants conclude their study by designing a system that addresses: limit setting, administrative backup systems, incentives, encouragement systems, and management and classroom structures that are supported in research-based practices. Students will design a behavioral change study based on extending a published research study.

SPE 548 Teaching Students with Low Incidence Disabilities - 3 credits

Prospective teachers are provided with an overview of classification, learning characteristics, and research-based strategies relevant to the education of students with moderate to severe disabilities. Emphasis is on assessing, planning instruction, and implementing a functional curriculum for students with significant cognitive delays and multiple disabilities. Students will review and summarize a series of journal articles that highlight peer-reviewed, research-based practices to support students with low incidence disabilities. This course will emphasize characteristics, etiological factors, child study teams, specific assessment tools, educational practices of applied behavioral analysis, related services, family issues, inclusion, transition activities and augmentative communication devices. Participants are required to participate in scenario problem-solving activities, and lead discussion with peers based on research studies.

SPE 550 Subject Area Content Access for Students with Learning Disabilities - 3 credits

This course is designed for the graduate level student seeking initial certification, the special education certification or the certified teacher seeking addition skills working with diverse population. This course will address the skills, knowledge and competencies necessary to meet the needs of students with disabilities in the content area classroom. This course works in conjunction with Teaching Methods I & II. Students will explore the current theory and practice of working with students with learning, emotional, and behavioral disorders in the Least Restrictive Environment (LRE). Students will learn to plan effectively for possible accommodations and/or modifications which may be necessary to implement effective instructional practices needed to make content accessible to students with learning disabilities.
Co or prerequisite ECE 531

SPE-575: Special Education Internship - 3 credits

The director of student teaching and field experiences arranges practicum assignments well in advance. The student should, therefore, check with her advisor during the junior year to obtain the due date for internship applications. The intern teacher is responsible for transportation arrangements and expenses in getting to the assigned practicum site. Please note that during the spring term, the intern teacher will be expected to teach during the College spring break. If a student is a resident student, she may remain in the resident hall but will be responsible for her own meals. Students will spend half of the semester working under the supervision of a special education professional in an included classroom context. Weekly observations and conferencing with the college supervisor will foster the development of the knowledge, skills and values learned in coursework in special education.
There is a $150.00 cooperating mentor teacher honorarium charged for this course.