Biology Courses

BIO 111 Concepts in Ecology and Environmental Issues - 4 credits

Contemporary environmental concerns on global, national and local levels are examined to increase awareness and scientific literacy and to promote stewardship in the understanding of their impact and application to human existence. In order to understand these environmental concerns it is important to study the nature of our environment, biodiversity, biogeochemical cycles, populations, and our renewable and non-renewable resources. The laboratory is an integral part of the course and will reinforce lecture material. (Not accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major.)

BIO 112 Concepts in Human Biology and Health Issues - 3 or 4 credits

The application of biological principles to contemporary health issues are examined in this course to provide awareness and scientific literacy about their potential impact and importance to our well-being and the choices we make. Students will gain an appreciation of the design of the human body through a study of its organization, the interrelationships among the many organ systems, patterns of chromosome and genetic inheritance and cancer. Students may take only the lecture portion of the course (3 credits) or the lecture and laboratory portion of the course (4 credits.) (Not accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major.)

BIO 117 Human Anatomy and Physiology I - 4 credits

A study of the unity of structure and function with clinical applications, this course will provide the foundation for understanding the design of the human body from the cell to the system level under the unifying theme of homeostasis. Topics include anatomical terminology, chemistry, cells, tissues, and the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and sensory systems. The laboratory component will focus on anatomical principles and complement lecture through microscopic and macroscopic observations. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. (Not accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major.)

BIO 118 Human Anatomy and Physiology II - 4 credits

A continuation of the study of structure and function with clinical applications important to understanding the human body under the unifying theme of homeostasis, this course will continue using physiological principles to study the endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, respiratory, digestive, urinary, reproductive systems, metabolism and development. The laboratory component will focus on anatomical principles and complement lecture with microscopic and macroscopic observations enhanced with dissections. Lecture 3 hours, Laboratory 3 hours. (Not accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major).
Prerequisite: BIO117 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 121 Principles of Biology I - 4 credits

An introduction to the basic, unifying principles of biological systems, this course emphasizes the building blocks of life, cellular metabolism and processes, patterns of inheritance and human genetics and molecular mechanisms of heredity and gene function. The laboratory emphasizes basic concepts within the field of biology, as well as important laboratory skills and techniques. This course is designed for science majors, allied health and pre-professional students. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Students majoring in the Biological Sciences must take both lecture and lab, students not majoring in the Biological Sciences may take only the lecture portion of the course (3 credits) or the lecture and laboratory portion of the course (4 credits) – these students should consult with their advisor for their major or concentration requirements. BIO 121 and 122 may be taken in either order.

BIO 122 Principles of Biology II - 4 credits

An introduction to evolutionary theory and principles, this course emphasizes plant diversity, structure and function, animal diversity, vertebrate animal structure and function, human structure and function, and an overview of ecology, animal behavior, and conservation biology. The laboratory includes student/faculty research and emphasizes skills and techniques. Three hours lecture, three hours laboratory. Students majoring in the Biological Sciences must take both lecture and lab, students not majoring in the Biological Sciences may take only the lecture portion of the course (3 credits) or the lecture and laboratory portion of the course (4 credits) – these students should consult with their advisor for their major or concentration requirements. BIO 121 and 122 may be taken in either order.

BIO 127 Clinical Microbiology - 4 credits

The general characteristics of bacteria, protozoa, yeasts, molds and viruses are used to understand the role of microorganisms in human health and disease. The interactions between the host and the microorganisms are emphasized as well as the physical and chemical methods of control. Infectious disease agents are covered by body system. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
Prerequisites: College-level chemistry course appropriate for intended major. Lab and lecture must be taken together the first time a student takes the course. (Not accepted as credit toward a Biological Sciences major.)

BIO/NEU 200 Introduction to Neuroscience - 3 credits

This introductory course covers many aspects of neuroscience including synaptic transmission, psychopharmacology, sensory systems, cognition, learning and basis of neurological disease.
Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122 or PSY 100, or permission of the instructor.

BIO 201 Research Directorship - 1 credit

Research Directors (RD’s) lead a team of 3-6 Principles of Biology II lab students through the many steps of scientific research. Developing a research plan and schedule, teaching laboratory and/or field techniques, critiquing oral presentations and a written abstract are the primary responsibilities of an RD.
Prerequisite: BIO 122 and permission of the instructor.

BIO 202 Kinesiology – 3 credits

The science of human movement is examined within the framework of musculoskeletal anatomy and biomechanical principles foundational to the fluidity of movement in everyday activities, exercise, dance, athletics and the aging process.  The relationships among structure, function, and force are observed qualitatively and quantitatively to understand normal movement and apply that knowledge to the limitations and impairment of movement and the impact on our health, injuries, and pathologies. Lecture and laboratory activities are integrated for alignment assessment, skeletal, muscular and joint anatomy, demonstrations of lever systems and muscle actions, and the use of goniometers to observe, assess and predict range of motion at joints. This course provides many applications in the fields of health and wellness, physical therapy, occupational therapy, exercise physiology, clinical rehabilitation, dance, and sports medicine.

BIO 207 Botany (Alternate years) - 4 credits

A study of plants from the green algae through the angiosperms. Plant structure, function, physiology, ecology, and conservation will be addressed. The laboratory portion of the course will focus on the evolutionary relationships among different plant families, learning of key characteristics to aid in plant identification, and understanding the economic/medicinal/cultural/agricultural (taste!) importance of specific plant groups. Majors in the Biological Sciences must take the lecture and laboratory sections of the course together. Students from other majors may choose just to enroll in the lecture. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO111 or BIO122 or permission of the instructor.

BIO/HON 215 Bioterrorism & Emerging Infectious Diseases - 3 credits

Ebola, anthrax, Lyme disease, SARS, polio, smallpox, the Plague, mad cow disease and the avian flu continue to attract the attention of the human species. These are either emerging infectious diseases (EIDs) or the agents responsible for the diseases that plague our kind. In some cases, EIDs and bioterrorism go hand in hand. This course will cover the biological mechanisms of a diversity of diseases, the ecology of disease agents and vectors, the impact of globalization on the spread of EIDs, agencies (e.g., CDC) involved in fighting the spread of diseases, bioterrorism in the past, present and future, and the socioeconomic impact of EIDs and bioterrorism. Lectures, debates, book discussions, films, and projects will be integral parts of this course.
Prerequisite: A genuine interest in learning more about emerging infectious diseases and bioterrorism; students from all disciplines are encouraged to participate in this course.

BIO 216 Outbreak Investigations: Case Studies in Epidemiology (Alternate Years) - 3 credits

At times, human societies have difficulty separating fact from fallacy. This is especially true during times of stress, such as when the Spanish flu swept the globe killing millions of people in 1918-1919. Uncertainties and false conclusions regarding the identity of the specific pathogen and the mode of transfer from one individual to another led to delayed or poor decisions that resulted in significantly more deaths. Health and human services were far exceeded and measures were taken that most would find unacceptable today. HIV/AIDS is another example of where the blend of fact and fallacy has led to the death of millions. Modern epidemiology has a set of approaches designed to help separate fact from fallacy and to help the human population effectively detect, identify, monitor, contain, prevent, and possibly eradicate a new or existing disease. In this course you will learn about these epidemiologic principles and concepts (e.g., confounding, bias, causal mechanisms) all within the context of case studies associated with outbreaks of toxic shock syndrome, Legionnaires' disease, measles, mumps, syphilis, yellow fever, Ebola hemorrhagic fever, and other diseases.
Prerequisite: A genuine interest in learning more about disease outbreaks and how epidemiologists investigate and work to minimize the impact of diseases on human populations; students from all disciplines are encouraged to participate in this course.

BIO 217 Anatomy and Physiology I - 4 credits

A comprehensive course integrating the structure and function of the human body with a problem- based approach, this course is a study of the organizational design of the body, homeostasis, the chemical basis of life, the structure and function of the cell, systemic histology and systemic physiology with an emphasis on the integumentary, skeletal, muscular, nervous and sensory systems. Dissections, including cat dissections, are an integral part of the laboratory experience. The laboratory component complements lecture through its focus on analysis and anatomy through both microscopic and macroscopic observations to understand the complexity of the human body. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
Prerequisite: BIO122 or permission of instructor.

BIO 218 Anatomy and Physiology II - 4 credits

A continuation of the comprehensive, problem-based approach to the study of structure, function and homeostasis in the human body, this course involves a study of the endocrine, cardiovascular, immune, lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Studies also include metabolism, nutrition, fluid and electrolyte balance, and growth and development. Dissections, including cat dissections, are an integral part of the laboratory experience. The laboratory component complements lecture through a continued microscopic and macroscopic analysis and comparison of organ systems. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
Prerequisite: BIO 217 or permission of instructor.

BIO/NEU/PSY 220 Sensation and Perception (Alternate years) - 3 or 4 credits

An in-depth study of sensory systems including vision, taste, olfaction, audition and somatic senses. This course fulfills only the 3 credit SCI requirement. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Lecture may be taken without the laboratory, but lab is required for Neuroscience majors.

Prerequisite: PSY 100 or BIO 121.

BIO 224 Animal Behavior: An Evolutionary Approach (Alternate years) - 3 credits

A study of the underlying (proximate) mechanisms and evolutionary (ultimate) causes of animal behavior. Topics will include how genes and the environment affect the development of behavior, the neurological control of behavior, and the evolution of behavioral adaptations (habitat selection, territoriality, migration, communication, predator avoidance, foraging strategies, reproductive strategies, and social behavior). The evolution of human behavior will also be discussed. Concepts will be introduced and discussed using a hypothetico-deductive approach.
Prerequisites: BIO 111 or BIO122 or PSY 100.

BIO 227 Microbiology - 4 credits

This course surveys microbial life including bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses (with an emphasis on bacteria). Topics covered include microbial characteristics, physical and chemical control, metabolism, enzymes, regulation of enzyme activity, bacterial genetics, microbial diversity, microbial control, and applications of microbiology. The laboratory includes aseptic technique, staining procedures, culture methods, cultural and physical characteristics, microbial control, microbiology of food, water, and soil, microbiology of the body, and identification of unknowns. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Prerequisites: BIO 121, 122, 236, CHE 111, 112 (CHE 205 and CHE 206 are recommended).

BIO 228 Marine Ecology (Alternate years) - 3 or 4 credits

This course is an introduction to the organisms, habitats, and ecosystems that make up the marine realm and the conservation issues that affect them. Special emphasis is given to neo-tropical marine ecosystems. Topics include physical oceanography, marine biodiversity, the ecology of marine organisms and communities, and marine conservation ecology. The optional field experience is taught at a marine station in the Caribbean. While at the field site, students will: (1) conduct a comparative biodiversity study of neo-tropical ecosystems, including coral reefs, sea grass beds, and mangroves, (2) conduct marine conservation research projects, and (3) be introduced to the local culture. Snorkeling is required. Students are responsible for all travel and lodging expenses. While this is a Fall semester course, the field portion will be held in early January. Lecture: 3 cr.; Field experience: 1cr.
Prerequisites: BIO 122 or BIO 111.

BIO 235 Ecology, Evolution, and Genetics - 4 credits

This course covers material beyond the introductory level in the areas of ecology, evolution, and classical genetics. Topics include population, community, and ecosystem ecology; extensions of Mendelian genetics; microevolution and evolutionary genetics; speciation; and macroevolution. The associated lab includes a field component, Lecture, three hours, laboratory, three hours.
Prerequisites (lecture and lab, C- or better): BIO121 and 122 required, CHE 111 and 112 recommended.

BIO 236 Cell and Molecular Biology - 4 credits

This course expands on fundamental concepts in the areas of cell and molecular biology with special emphasis on the molecular reactions and cellular structures found inside of eukaryotic cells. Topics will include microscopy; cell structure and function; cell cycle and reproduction; gene expression and its control; molecular mechanisms of inheritance, inter- and intracellular signaling and interactions. In conjunction with the lecture course, the laboratory sections will provide the students with firsthand experience in commonly used experimental techniques in cell and molecular biology. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
Prerequisites (lecture and lab, C- or better): BIO121 and 122 required, CHE 111 and 112 recommended.

BIO 243 Biology Independent Research - 1-2 credits

This course is designed for students who are interested in conducting independent research under the guidance of a faculty member from the Department of Biological Sciences, but have not developed a research proposal for their independent project. This course may be repeated; 2 credits per semester is the standard load. 

Prerequisites: permission of the faculty supervising the research.

BIO 248 Biostatistics - 3 credits

An introduction to descriptive and inferential statistical methods that enable scientists to accurately convey to the scientific community the information within their data sets. Both parametric and nonparametric methods are addressed. All methods and concepts are taught within the realm of research scenarios; this applied approach serves to match the current or future research-needs of the participants and to eliminate the perceived esoteric nature of this quantitative science. With a strong understanding of the scientific method and key statistical concepts, students learn how to critique the research design and data analyses within scientific papers, posters and oral presentations. They also develop their critical thinking skills by learning how to recognize the biases and misleading information commonly found within present day advertisements.
Prerequisite: At least sophomore standing.

BIO 261 The Amazon Basin: Natural History, Culture, and Conservation - 3 credits

This is a field-based experience on the natural history, conservation, and culture of the North Rupununi region of the Amazon Basin, Guyana, South America. Students will learn about the natural history of the tropical rainforest and savannah biomes and the conservation issues that affect these areas through hikes, boat trips, readings, and discussions. Students will also learn about the culture of the Makushi indigenous people and the issues that affect them. The Makushi still hunt with bow and arrow, build dugout canoes, and practice small scale shifting agriculture. However, the North Rupununi is undergoing rapid change from an expanding ecotourism industry that is competing with oil interests, gold mining, timber harvesting, and loss of habitat for soybean production.
Prerequisites: Sophomore standing

BIO 300 Evolution (Alternate years) - 3 or 4 credits

This course involves in-depth study of mechanisms of evolution and how they relate to the complexity of the world and its organisms. Evolutionary change will be studied as it occurs at the genetic level, within populations, between species, and as it relates to physical changes in the environment. The use of fossil, morphological, and molecular data to tease apart evolutionary relationships among taxa will be discussed and examined further in the lab. Students may take only the lecture portion of the course (3 credits) or the lecture and laboratory portion of the course (4 credits).
Prerequisites: BIO 235, 236.

BIO 301 Ecology and Natural History of the American Southwest (Alternate years) - 4 credits

This course will take place in Arizona. Students will fly to Arizona to study Sonoran desert and mountain habitats in the Tucson area as well as several Nature Conservancy sites in southern and eastern Arizona. Students will learn about the plants and animals of the southwestern deserts and mountains by visiting several museums and parks, in addition to collecting data in the field.  In addition to completing several field-based research projects, students will read published papers on research conducted in the area previously and complete discussion questions on the readings. This course has additional fees associated with it.
Prerequisites: BIO 111 or BIO 122 and permission of the instructor.

BIO 304 Pathophysiology - 3 credits

A study of the underlying changes in human physiology at the tissue and organ level that result from disease and injury.
Prerequisite: BIO 117 and 118 or 217 and 218 or permission of the instructor.

BIO 309 Conservation Biology and GIS - 3 or 4 credits

An overview of the science of conservation covering 1) the nature of conservation biology and the definition, origin, and global patterns of biodiversity, 2) the threats to biodiversity including habitat destruction and fragmentation, exotic species introductions, overexploitation, and disease, 3) how these threats affect the genetics and demographic processes of small populations, and 4) an introduction to the methods used to stop the loss of biodiversity including establishing new populations, ex situ conservation strategies, the design, establishment, and management of protected areas, and restoration ecology. In lab, the relationship of GPS (Global Positioning System) and GIS (Geographic Information Systems) to the field of conservation biology and land management, will be discussed through readings in the primary literature and experienced through class projects. Projects include mapping and data basing the Cedar Crest College Buildings and Arboretum and assessing habitat use . Students may take only the lecture portion of the course (3 credits) or the lecture and laboratory portion of the course (4 credits). Students majoring in Environmental Conservation must take both lecture and lab. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. 

Prerequisite: BIO 235.

BIO 311 Multidisciplinary Solutions for Global Diseases 2 credits

A child dies every 30 seconds from malaria. Dysentery, AIDS, influenza, cancer, tuberculosis, cholera, cardiovascular disease, and hepatitis also have a significant impact on the human population. Minimizing the disease-related suffering and deaths around the world requires new ideas and effort. This capstone course for the Global Diseases minor provides an opportunity for students, through a formal presentation and written thesis, to propose their multidisciplinary solution for health-related problems within the region of their respective cultural experience. Critical-thinking and leadership skills are imperative.
Prerequisites: an approved cultural experience, plus all courses required for the minor except for one cognate course and the upper-level elective.

BIO 313 Advanced Mendelian and Population Genetics - 3 credits

This course deals with advanced concepts in the inheritance of genes and traits. Extensions of Mendelian genetics include gene interaction, recombination, and quantitative genetics. Topics in population genetics include Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and its extensions, Wright-Fisher populations, the coalescent, linkage disequilibrium, and molecular population genetics. The course emphasizes theory and applications, the latter including conservation, biomedical, and forensic genetics.
Prerequisite: BIO 236.

BIO 315 Case Studies in Conservation Biology - 2-3 Credits

This course will be taught in a seminar style and involve a review and discussion of readings, issues and examples in biodiversity and conservation biology. Students will work independently and in small groups to critique Federally endangered species recovery plans, create materials that would be informative to the public regarding conservation issues, and debate the design of a park/preserve. Students taking the course for 3, rather than 2 credits, will also participate in service-learning projects involving environmental issues in the local community.
Prerequisites: BIO121, 122, and 235; BIO309 is strongly recommended (can be taken concurrently).

BIO 323 Bioinformatics (Alternate years) - 4 credits

This course is a study of central concepts in bioinformatics. Topics will include DNA and protein sequence alignment, database searches and phylogenetic reconstruction; genomics and related disciplines; and perl programming. Emphasis will be placed on the current primary literature. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours.
Prerequisites: BIO 235 and BIO 236, or permission of the instructor.

BIO 327 Microbial Pathogenesis and Human Immunology (Alternate years) - 3 or 4 credits

This course will introduce the microorganisms responsible for many common diseases and the ways in which the human body can protect itself against these disease agents. Topics include immunology, bacteriology, virology, mycology, parasitology, and microbial pathogenesis. Lectures, case studies, current events, and discussions will be integral parts of this course. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Students may take only the lecture portion of the course (3 credits) or the lecture and lab (4 credits).
Prerequisites: BIO227, or permission of the instructor.

BIO/NEU 330 Neuropharmacology (Alternate years) - 3 credits

An in-depth study of the pharmacological aspects of neuroscience with an emphasis on clinical applications.
Prerequisite: NEU 200.

BIO 332 Developmental Biology (Alternate years) - 3 or 4 credits

From the DNA blueprint to an organism’s final structure, this course is a morphological and molecular study of growth and differentiation. Lecture may be taken without the laboratory.
Prerequisites: BIO 235 and 236.

BIO 335 Molecular Genetics I - 4 credits

Part one of a two-part course in molecular genetics, this semester emphasizes molecular mechanisms as they apply to prokaryotic organisms. Lectures will begin with a general review of genetics and cell biology, cover basic techniques used in molecular biology research, and then detail the processes of DNA replication and transcription in prokaryotes. They will explore controversial issues as they relate to molecular genetics and present their findings using various formats such as position papers, online threaded discussions, podcasts, and poster displays. In the laboratory portion of this course, students will use restriction endonucleases to clone specific genes from bacterial DNA. They will demonstrate their success through restriction mapping, gene-specific PCR, and gene expression.
Prerequisites: BIO 236.

BIO 336 Molecular Genetics II - 4 credits

Part two of a two-part course in molecular genetics, this semester emphasizes molecular mechanisms as they apply to eukaryotic organisms. Lectures explore basic techniques used in molecular biology research as the processes of transcription and translation in eukaryotes are examined. The impact that current research in the field of molecular genetics has on society health issues and world politics is also examined. In the laboratory portion of this course, students design and conduct original research projects to explore gene expression in eukaryotic organisms.
Prerequisite: BIO335.

BIO 339 Biology of Cancer (Alternate years) - 3 credits

This course covers the genetics, molecular biology, and cellular biology of cancer from DNA mutagenesis to cellular transformation. We will try to answer the following questions: What is cancer? What causes cancer? How can cancer be treated? Specific Topics to be covered include maintenance of genomic integrity, cell-cycle control, oncogenes and tumor suppressors, metastasis, and anti-cancer treatment strategies. The course will rely heavily on the primary literature with a special focus on current topics in Cancer Biology.
Prerequisites: BIO-236 or instructor approval

BIO/NEU 340 Neuroscience Methods (Alternate years) - 4 credits

This laboratory course introduces students to several of the methods currently used by neuroscientists including electrophysiological, histological and molecular techniques. The lecture component explores both classical and current literature in Neuroscience. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. 

Prerequisites: BIO222 or236, NEU 200 or PSY 229.

BIO 341 Mammalian Cell Culture & Microscopy (Alternate years) - 1.5 credits

This lab intensive course will explore animal cell culture and associated microscopy techniques. Students will learn how to grow and maintain animal cell cultures, work with immortalized cell cultures, and how to transfect cells with exogenous DNA. There will also be a focus on the theory and application of advanced techniques in microcopy, including fluorescence and laser scanning confocal microscopy of animal cells.
Prerequisites: BIO-236 or instructor permission

BIO 343 Advanced Polymerase Chain Reaction Techniques (Alternate years) - 1.5 credits

This lab-intensive course focuses on the theoretical and practical applications e of polymerase chain reaction (PCR), one of the most important tools of molecular biology, and has applications in a broad range of scientific disciplines, including clinical characterization and treatment of disease, forensic science, evolutionary biology, and genetics. The course exposes students to advanced PCR techniques including site-specific DNA mutagenesis, reverse transcriptase PCR to measure gene expression, High Resolution Melt Analysis (HRM) real time PCR to identify genetic diseases, and PCR Genotyping of criminal suspect DNA.
Prerequisites: BIO 236 and junior or senior standing.

BIO 344 DNA Sequencing (Alternate years) - 1.5 credits

This lab-intensive weekend course will help students to better understand both the Sanger and Maxam-Gilbert Methods of sequencing. Students will experience Sanger sequencing through both manual and automated sequencing methods. They will also learn how to interpret data as they use biotechnology to identify sequences and build basic sequence comparisons.
Prerequisites: BIO236 and junior or senior status.

BIO 345 Advanced Recombinant DNA Techniques - 3 credits

This capstone course for Genetic Engineering majors will cover advanced techniques in molecular biology, with a special focus on molecular genetic and recombinant techniques. The course will include discussions of mechanisms of manipulating the genomes of scientifically important model organisms, and discuss the clinical and ethical implications of such manipulations. We will also cover the multiple “omics,” including genomics and proteomics that are used to study biological and clinical problems. The course will have a strong emphasis on readings and discussions of the primary literature related to topics covered in class.
Prerequisites: BIO335, 336.

BIO/NEU 348 Diseases of the Nervous System (Alternate years) - 3 or 4 credits

Our brains control everything that makes us human, including how we think, feel, learn, and how we perceive the outside world. When the brain is damaged by disease or injury or fails to form correctly during development, the results can be catastrophic. This course will examine selected diseases of the nervous system at both the clinical and the molecular level and assess current treatments. Diseases to be discussed may include Alzheimer, schizophrenia, neural tube defects, autism, and spinal cord injuries. Readings from the primary literature and laboratory activities will complement the lecture material. Lecture three hours, laboratory three hours. Lecture may be taken without the laboratory.
Prerequisites: BIO 235, 236.

BIO 349 Protein Purification and Analysis (Alternate years) - 1.5 credits

This laboratory-intensive weekend course covers the methodologies of protein purification, such as column chromatography and ammonium sulfate precipitation, quantification of protein concentration through colorimetric methods, and protein analysis through both denaturing and non-denaturing PAGE. Various methods of detection are used including coomassie blue stain, an enzymatic assay, and western blot. By the end of the course, students generate their own data, compare purification methods, and produce an end report in either a paper or poster format.
Prerequisites: BIO236 and junior or senior status.

BIO 350 Junior Colloquium - 2 credits

This course fulfills two goals: (1) development of career plans and skills, including interviews, resumes, and oral, written, and computer communication. (2) development of critical thinking skills through the selection of a research topic and preparation of a research proposal. Should a student select the thesis option for her major, this proposal will be the foundation for her thesis research. This course is part of the capstone requirement for all majors in the Department of Biological Sciences, and is normally taken in the fall of the junior year.
Prerequisite: BIO 121, 122, either BIO 235 with lab or BIO 236 with lab, and Junior standing.

BIO 353 Biology Independent Research - 1-2 credits

This course is designed for students who wish to complete the Thesis Option for their major by conducting independent research under the guidance of a faculty member from the Department of Biological Sciences. Students who choose to conduct thesis research should have developed a proposal that outlines their research plan prior to registering for this course. This course may be repeated; 2 credits per semester is the standard load. The Thesis Option requires a minimum of 4 credits earned by working in a coherent research project.
Prerequisites: permission of the faculty supervising the research and successful completion of BIO350.

BIO 354 Thesis and Presentation - 1 credit

This course serves as the capstone course for the Thesis Option for all majors in the Department of Biological Sciences. Completion of this course requires (1) submission of a written thesis to the faculty supervising the student’s thesis research and (2) oral or poster presentation of the student’s research project to the college community at the Biological Sciences Research Symposium.
Prerequisites: Declared major within the Department of Biological Sciences; permission of the faculty supervising the research; 4 credits of BIO 353 (or two semesters of BIO 243 and one semester of BIO 353), CHE 391/392 (2 credits of BIO 353 - CHE391/392 may be taken concurrently).

BIO 356 Science, Ethics and Society - 3 credits

This course provides science majors with an opportunity to form connections between their scientific background and society as a whole. Students will gain an understanding of the role of science in society, including the challenges facing women in science, and the importance of ethics within science. This course is part of the capstone requirement for all majors in the Department of Biological Sciences and is normally taken in the fall of the senior year.
Prerequisite: BIO 235 with lab, BIO 236 with lab, BIO 350.

BIO 357 Reflection on an Integrated Biology Major

A student who majors in Integrated Biology will take a minimum of 12 credit hours of coursework in another discipline, and should be able to demonstrate how this discipline integrates with biology.  In this course, the student will reflect on this integration through a written assignment and, as appropriate, a supporting portfolio. 
Prerequisite: Senior standing, a declared major in Integrated Biology, and completion of integrated coursework (may be taken concurrently).

BIO 548 Research Design & Statistics - 3 credits

This online course has been designed for graduate students and professionals who are in the process of developing or actively participating in a research project and would like to enhance their statistical skills to effectively analyze and convey the information within their data set(s). The course not only presents a diversity of statistical and graphics techniques that will help participants address their current research needs, it also reveals new approaches one can use to answer subsequent research questions. Microsoft Excel and XLSTAT-Pro (www.xlstat.com) will be used to demonstrate a diversity of parametric, nonparametric, univariate, bivariate and multivariate statistical tests and tools. Demonstration of each tool/test will be presented within the context of an actual or hypothetical research project. Research Design & Statistics is 99% application and 1% theory; the goal is to rapidly and effectively help researchers use statistics in a correct and meaningful way. The course does not require previous training in statistics; however, active participation in the research process is essential for quality learning.
Prerequisites: Active professional or student with graduate standing; both must be conducting research or in the process of developing a research project. In some cases, Cedar Crest College allows undergraduates to take graduate courses. In the case of BIO 548, undergraduates must be (1) actively involved in research, (2) at the senior level, and (3) a student who has completed a college statistics course with a grade of B or above.

BIO 360 Special Topics in Biology - 1-4 credits

A consideration of a selected topic in contemporary or classical biology. Permission of the instructor is required. BIO 390 Independent Study 1-4 credits Prerequisite: Permission of faculty.

Biology Courses Offered in Affiliation with Hawk Mountain Sanctuary

All Hawk Mountain courses are held regardless of weather conditions and require outdoor fieldwork and hiking on rugged terrain. Appropriate clothing and footgear are recommended. Students must provide their own transportation to the Hawk Mountain Sanctuary in Kempton, PA. All classes, including the first class, for Hawk Mountain courses are held at the Acopian Center for Conservation Learning (ACCL) at Hawk Mountain. The only exception is the first class for BIO 111 Concepts in Ecology and Environment at Hawk Mountain (summer course). This class is held at Cedar Crest College. The rest of the BIO 111 classes are then held at the ACCL.

BIO 251 Neotropical Migrant Birds - 1 credit

A focus on neo-tropical migrant birds with consideration of their natural history, identification and migratory patterns. Students learn orientation and theory in the classroom. Location, identification and discussion of species are studied in the field (Hawk Mountain Sanctuary and surrounding area). The course meets one weekend in late April or early May.

BIO 252 Field Ornithology - 3 credits

A field course oriented to identification, adaptations, habitat associations and sociobiology of birds at Hawk Mountain. The course meets for two weekends (one in September and October).

BIO 253 Dynamics of Raptor Migration - 1 credit

An introduction to hawk migration, including the effects of weather and geography, hawk identification, migration research and a small independent project. The course meets for two Saturdays in the fall.

BIO 256 Birds of Prey in Winter: A Study in Adaptation (Alternate years) - 1 credit

An introduction to the winter ecology of Pennsylvania’s hawks, eagles and falcons, with emphasis on hunting strategies and tactics, prey selection, competition for food and aggressive interactions. The course meets for one weekend in late January.

BIO 259 Nesting Birds of Prey (Alternate years) - 1 credit

An introduction to the breeding ecology of Pennsylvania’s hawks, eagles, falcons and owls, with emphasis on territorial behavior, parent-offspring interactions, nestling growth and development and conservation ecology. The course meets for one weekend in March.