Environmental Conservation - Major

For information, contact ProfessorJohn Cigliano, jaciglia@cedarcrest.edu, 610-606-4666, ext. 3702

Program Description

The Environmental Conservation major is for students who are concerned about the environment and are interested in helping to protect species, habitats, and ecosystems – the world’s biodiversity. The B.S. in Environmental Conservation is a field-based major that allows students to pursue a scientific study in environment conservation by providing students with a strong foundation and advanced study in the concepts and principles of ecology and conservation biology. The B.A. in Environmental Conservation also provides a strong foundation in conservation biology but is more interdisciplinary and allows students to design their own course of study and focus through the integration of environmental conservation  with other disciplines, either through co-majors, minors, concentrations, or by self-designing a package of general electives from disciplines across campus. Both majors present environmental conservation within global, sociopolitical, and cultural contexts.

Upon graduation, students of either major will be able to pursue graduate study or careers in environmental conservation and related fields, for example, governmental and non-governmental agencies and organizations; education, policy and advocacy organizations; environmental consulting, law, and publishing firms; sustainability officers/managers; and museums, zoos and aquariums. The B.A. in Environmental Conservation is especially suited for students who want careers outside the typical science career path, for example in journalism, policy, or writing.

Program Mission Statement – Environmental Conservation B.S.

The mission of the B.S. in Environmental Conservation is to provide women with the knowledge and skills needed to protect biodiversity: species, habitats, and ecosystems. Students majoring in Environmental Conservation study conservation issues within global, sociopolitical, and cultural contexts, become civically engaged, and learn to communicate the importance of preserving biodiversity to a variety of audiences. Students who complete the B.S. degree are prepared to solve the environmental issues that affect biodiversity through scientific study and conservation-related research and to become leaders in the field of environmental conservation.

Program Requirements for the Environmental Conservation Major (B.S.)

A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.000 and a minimum average in the major of 2.000 are required for the major in Environmental Conservation (B.S.). A grade of C- or better is needed for all courses that fulfill the departmental requirements. Courses transferred in for all majors must be taken less than ten years ago. Students may not declare multiple majors in any combination of: Biology, Environmental Conservation (B.S. or B.A.), Genetic Engineering, Integrated Biology, Neuroscience, or Nuclear Medicine Technology. Students must earn a grade of C- or better in prerequisite courses before proceeding to subsequent courses.

Total Number of Credits: 77

Course Requirements

BIO 121 Principles of Biology I 4 credits*

BIO 122 Principles of Biology II 4 credits* 

BIO 235 Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 4 credits

BIO 236 Cell and Molecular Biology 4 credits

BIO 248 Biostatistics 3 credits 

BIO 300 Evolution 4 credits 

BIO 360 Advanced Ecology
BIO 309 Conservation Biology and GIS 4 credits **

BIO 315 Case Studies in Biodiversity and Conservation Biology 3 credits**

BIO 350 Junior Colloquium 2 credits **

BIO 356 Science, Ethics, and Society 3 credits**

CHE 111 Chemical Principles 4 credits 

CHE 112 Chemical Equilibrium & Analysis 4 credits 

CHE 205 Organic Chemistry I 4 credits 

CHE 320 Environmental Chemistry 4 credits 


MAT 141 Calculus I 3 credits 

Field Research Experience 4 credits***

Electives chosen from the following summing to at least 5:
BIO 207 Botany 4 credits
BIO 224 Animal Behavior 3 credits 

BIO 227 Microbiology 4 credits 

BIO 228 Marine Ecology (can be taken without lab) 3 or 4 credits


BIO 313 Advanced Mendelian & Population Genetics
3 credits
BIO 323 Bioinformatics 3 credits
BIO 353 Independent Research 4 credits maximum

The following courses ate strongly recommended for students planning to go to graduate school:
PHY 101 Introductory College Physics I 4 credits
PHY 102 Introductory College Physics II 4 credits
MAT 142 Calculus II 3 credits
ANT 100 Sociocultural Anthropology is recommended to partially satisfy the Social Science Liberal Arts requirement

*Students with Advanced Placement credit for BIO121 and/or 122 are required to take the BIO121 and 122 Labs.)

**Transfer students must take these courses at Cedar Crest, all Environmental Conservation majors must take both lecture and lab of BIO 309.

***Students can take one of the following to satisfy the Field Research Experience requirement (minimum of 4 credits):
BIO 228 Marine Ecology (must take with lab) 4 credits

BIO 301 Ecology & Natural History of the American Southwest 4 credits
BIO 353 Independent Research 4 credits
School for Field Studies (see below) Variable 

Other field research experience (international or domestic) approved by advisor Variable credits
†With Advisor approval. Cannot be used to satisfy both the Field Research Experience and Elective requirements.

School for Field Studies

Cedar Crest College is an affiliate member of the School for Field Studies (SFS).Through this affiliation, Cedar Crest students are able to conduct hands-on, community-focused environmental field work in SFS programs around the world, including sites in Australia, Turks & Caicos Islands (British West Indies),Costa Rica, Panama, Bhutan, and Kenya/Tanzania. These are month-long summer and semester-long programs and are in addition to the field opportunities provided directly by Cedar Crest College.

The benefits of the affiliation with SFS to Cedar Crest students include

  • receiving credit for the program directly from Cedar Crest (i.e., not transfer credit)
  • waiver of the $150 registration fee
  • preferential consideration for SFS financial aid
  • access to specially designated spaces held for Affiliates until March 15th and October 15th for the following Fall and Spring semesters, respectively.

For more information about the programs at SFS, visit www.fieldstudies.org

Fulfillment of LAC Requirements

Students fulfill the Technology, Oral Presentation, and Information Literacy requirement through successful completion of the following required courses: BIO 122, BIO 235, BIO 236, BIO 350, and BIO 356. Students also fulfill the Natural Sciences (BIO 121 and BIO 122), Mathematics and Logic (MAT 141 and BIO 248), Writing 2 (BIO 309, BIO 356), and Global Studies (BIO 309) requirement upon successful completion of the major.

Additional course requirements for the Thesis Option (B.S. only):

All students, particularly those who are interested in attending graduate school or obtaining a research-based job following graduation, are highly encouraged to participate in independent research, which may culminate in a thesis. The thesis option begins during the student’s junior year as part of Junior Colloquium (BIO 350). Most majors from the Department of Biological Sciences  require students to develop a research proposal to investigate an original research question. This experience allows the students to go beyond the basic course information, select a problem that interests them, and apply what they have learned in their coursework to a novel situation. As part of the thesis option, students will spend a minimum of two semesters working with a faculty member to conduct the research outlined in their proposal. They will then develop a written thesis detailing their project and present their final project to the department in the form of a seminar talk or poster. Requirements towards fulfilling the thesis include: a.) two semesters (4 credits) of Independent Research (BIO 353) or b.) two semesters of Independent Research (BIO 243); and one semester of Independent Research (BIO 353), and one semester (1 credit) of Senior Thesis and Presentation (BIO 354) with grades of C- or better.

Program Outcomes

All Majors within the Department of Biological Sciences have the following three outcomes:

  • Students can apply the foundation concepts and principles of the Biological Sciences, including cellular structure and function, genetics and molecular biology, evolution and organismal diversity, and ecology.
  • Students can discuss the interaction of science and society, including the ethical practice of science, within the local, national, and global community.
  • Students can write about and interpret the methodologies of scientific research.

Environmental Conservation B.S. Outcomes

  • Students can explain the value of biodiversity and why it is important to conserve it, from both an ecosystem and human health and welfare perspective.
  • Students can explain the causes of biodiversity loss and design appropriate strategies to maintain and restore biodiversity.
  • Students can build and interpret a phylogeny representing evolutionary relationships among organisms to better understand the cause and nature of biodiversity.

 

Program Mission Statement – Environmental Conservation B.A.

The mission of the B.A. in Environmental Conservation program is to provide women with the knowledge and skills needed to protect biodiversity: species, habitats, and ecosystems. Students majoring in Environmental Conservation study conservation issues within global, sociopolitical, and cultural contexts, become civically engaged, and learn to communicate the importance of preserving biodiversity to a variety of audiences. Students who complete the B.A. degree are prepared to solve the environmental issues that affect biodiversity through an interdisciplinary approach and to become leaders in the field of environmental conservation.

Program Requirements for the Environmental Conservation Major (B.A.)

A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.000 and a minimum average in the major of 2.000 are required for the major in Environmental Conservation (B.A.). A grade of C- or better is needed for all courses that fulfill the departmental requirements. Courses transferred in for all majors must be taken less than ten years ago. Students may not declare multiple majors in any combination of: Biology, Environmental Conservation (B.S. or B.A.), Genetic Engineering, Integrated Biology, Neuroscience or Nuclear Medicine Technology. Students must earn a grade of C- or better in prerequisite courses before proceeding to subsequent courses.

Total Number of Credits: 49

Course Requirements

BIO 121 Principles of Biology I 4 credits*

BIO 122 Principles of Biology II 4 credits* 

BIO 235 Ecology, Evolution and Genetics 4 credits

CHE 111 Chemical Principles 4 credits
CHE 112 Chemical Equilibrium and Analysis 4 credits
MAT 110 Probability & Statistics 3 credits
BIO 309 Conservation Biology and GIS** 4 credits
BIO 315 Case Studies in Biodiversity & Conservation Biology** 3 credits
ANT 100 Cultural Anthropology 3 credits
GST 100 The Globalizing World 3 credits
ECO 222 Economic Geography 3 credits
PHI 200 Ethics 3 credits
COM 150 Introduction to Journalism 3 credits or COM 212 Intercultural Communication 4 credits
Field Experience 4 credits

Students satisfy the Field Experience requirement (minimum of 4 credits) through the following:
BIO 228 Marine Ecology (with lab) 4 credits
BIO 301 Ecol. & Nat. Hist. Am. Southwest 4 credits
School for Field Studies, Variable
Hawk Mountain courses (totaling at least 4 credits)
Other study abroad experience (international or domestic) approved by advisor Variable credits

*Students with Advanced Placement credit for BIO121 and/or 122 are required to take the BIO121 and 122 Labs.)

**Transfer students must take these courses at Cedar Crest; all Environmental Conservation majors must take both lecture and lab of BIO 309.

Fulfillment of LAC Requirements

Students fulfill the Technology, Oral Presentation, and Information Literacy requirement through successful completion of the following required courses: BIO 122 and BIO 235. Students also fulfill the Natural Sciences (BIO 121 and BIO 122), Writing 2 (BIO 309), and Global Studies (BIO 309) requirements and partially or fully fulfill the Mathematics and Logic (MAT 141) and Social Sciences (ANT 100) requirement upon successful completion of the major.

Program Outcomes

All Majors within the Department of Biological Sciences have the following three outcomes:

  • Students can apply the foundation concepts and principles of the Biological Sciences, including cellular structure and function, genetics and molecular biology, evolution and organismal diversity, and ecology.
  • Students can discuss the interaction of science and society, including the ethical practice of science, within the local, national, and global community.
  • Students can write about and interpret the methodologies of scientific research.

Environmental Conservation B.A. Outcomes

  • Students can explain the causes of biodiversity loss and design appropriate strategies to maintain and restore biodiversity.
  • Students can discuss show sociopolitical and cultural contexts influence environmental conservation strategies and policies.
  • Students can effectively communicate to a variety of audiences the value of biodiversity and the need to conserve biodiversity, from an ecosystem and a human health and socioeconomic perspective.