Online Graduate Nursing Programs

For information, contact Dr. Wendy J. Robb, wjrobb@cedarcrest.edu or 610-606-4606.

Mission of the Graduate Nursing Program

The mission of the Cedar Crest College graduate nursing program is to educate and prepare nurse leaders who will advance evidence-based practice, education, and healthcare delivery to improve health outcomes for individuals, families, and communities within a global context.

Master of Science in Nursing Program

The Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) program is designed to prepare students to function as nurse leasers in a wide variety of practice and educational settings. The program is innovative in approach and design, offering students a part-time, year-round track. In the nursing practitioner programs, the curriculum encourages students to further their clinical expertise, while developing proficiency in the specialties of family/individual across the lifespan and adult-gerontology acute care nurse practitioner. Graduates will be prepared to assume leadership positions in a variety of clinical practice roles and will be equipped to influence change within the healthcare delivery systems of the twenty-first century. The nurse educator and administrator programs foster development of nursing leadership skills that will enable graduates to assess and evaluate nursing and healthcare practice systems, educational methods, and research findings, while also equipping students to develop evidence-based practice changes in healthcare agencies or academic institutions. Graduates will be prepared to continue their education in doctoral programs of study.

The Cedar Crest College Master of Science in Nursing program nurse educator and administrator tracks are accredited by the Accreditation Commission for Education in Nursing (ACEN) at 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 850, Atlanta, Georgia 30326, 404.975.5000. The Master of Science in Nursing program family/individual across the lifespan and adult-gerontology nurse practitioner tracks are approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing and are under review for initial accreditation by ACEN during the 2017-2018 academic year.

The Cedar Crest College Nursing Department’s facilities are housed in the Hamilton Boulevard Building, a state-of-the-art facility that is one of the finest of its kind in the region. The 34,000 square foot building includes: three multi-media labs including a health assessment lab, a maternal and pediatric lab, and an adult health lab; a fully equipped nursing unit that simulates a hospital environment; a simulation center with 2 adjacent computerized learning mannequin laboratories and a separate control/observation room; a community health lab set up to replicate a home-care environment; convertible classrooms, and conference facilities to accommodate 300 persons. There is a dedicated 3,900 square foot lab area for the graduate nursing programs that includes: a simulation space featuring two high-fidelity simulation rooms, debriefing room, simulated operating room, perioperative area, 10-bay advanced health assessment lab, student study areas and lockers for student belongings. The Hamilton Boulevard Building provides high speed wireless internet and also houses a computer lab for student use. All nursing faculty offices are located in the Hamilton Boulevard Building.

Full-time faculty contributing teaching and research to the program include:

MSN Admission Requirements

Students are admitted to graduate programs at Cedar Crest College on the basis of individual qualifications. Requests for application materials and all correspondence relating to admission should be addressed to:

Cedar Crest College
School for Adult and Graduate Education
100 College Drive
Allentown, PA 18104-6196
Phone: 610-740-3770
Email: sage@cedarcrest.edu
Fax: 610-740-3786
Online Application Materials: www.cedarcrest.edu/graduate

Students are encouraged to visit the campus to discuss their educational plans. Upon request a campus visit may be arranged along with an opportunity to meet with the Director of the Graduate Nursing Program. For more information, please contact Dr. Sharon Melincavage at smmelinc@cedarcrest.edu, 610-606-4666 ext 3342.

A rolling admissions policy is in effect for this program. Applications are accepted and reviewed on a continuing basis throughout the year.

The general admissions requirements for the Master of Science in Nursing program are as follows:

Master of Science in Nursing Program Goals and Expected Student Learning Outcomes

MSN Program Goals

The Master of Science in Nursing program at Cedar Crest College has five program goals and expected student learning outcomes for the Family/Individual Across the Lifespan Nurse Practitioner (FNP), Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (AG-ACNP), nursing administration and nursing education tracks.

  1. Integrate knowledge of theory and research to develop a comprehensive and ethical approach for nursing practice, education, and administration in a global society.
  2. Utilize advanced clinical knowledge and skill to promote, maintain, and/or restore optimum wellness to clients.
  3. Articulate the issues and trends that affect the social, economic, political, and institutional forces that influence nursing and health care delivery.
  4. Critically appraise and utilize scientific, expert, and other sources of knowledge to ensure quality outcomes in the context of evidence-based practice.
  5. Develop collaborative and interprofessional relationships to improve health outcomes in a variety of settings.

Expected Student Learning Outcomes by Track

Family/Individual Across the Lifespan Nurse Practitioner

The focus of the Family Nurse Practitioner (FNP) specialty Cedar Crest College is on primary care. The graduate nursing program builds on the baccalaureate curriculum. Therefore, students are expected to enter the program with prerequisite coursework and clinical nursing competence. The FNP track prepares graduates to function as clinical experts who provide high quality, holistic healthcare approach to care of individuals and families in a primary care setting. Graduates will be eligible to take the Family Nurse Practitioner certification exam offered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP).

At the completion of the program the graduate will be prepared to:

  1. Provide full scope of evidence-based primary care, utilizing both independent and collaborative approaches, to individuals and families across the lifespan.
  2. Manage acute and chronic health problems, health promotion activities, disease prevention, and transitional support and end of life care.
  3. Participate in evidence-based quality improvement initiatives to improve healthcare outcomes.
  4. Coordinate health care teams and engage in inter-professional collaboration with members of the health care team.
  5. Advocate for health care systems and policies that reduce health disparities, facilitate access to care, and address cultural diversity.

Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner

The AG-ACNP track prepares registered nurses with acute-care experience essential to provide direct patient management in acute and complex healthcare settings. Graduates will apply evidence-based practice principles to provide advanced nursing care to address the specialized physiologic and psychological needs of adult/gerontology patients with acute, critical, and/or complex chronic health conditions. The AG-ACNP graduate will focus on the provision of restorative, curative, rehabilitative, palliative, and/or supportive end-of-life care as determined by patient needs.

Upon graduation, the student will be eligible to take the Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner certifying examination offered by American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC).

At the completion of the program, the graduate will be able to:

  1. Provide full scope of evidence-based care, utilizing both independent and collaborative approaches, to the adult/gerontology population.
  2. Manage acute, critical, and/or complex chronic health problems, health promotion activities, disease prevention, and transitional support and end of life care.
  3. Participate in evidence-based quality improvement initiatives to improve healthcare outcomes.
  4. Coordinate health care teams and engage in inter-professional collaboration with members of the health care team.
  5. Advocate for health care systems and policies that reduce health disparities, facilitate access to care, and address cultural diversity.

Nurse Educator Track

Upon completion of the Nurse Educator track, the graduate will be able to:

  1. Create an environment in classroom, laboratory, and clinical settings that facilitate student learning and achievement of desired cognitive, affective, and psychomotor outcomes.
  2. Recognize the responsibility for helping students develop as nurses and integrate the values and behaviors expected of those who fulfill that role.
  3. Use a variety of strategies to assess and evaluate student learning in classroom, laboratory and clinical settings, as well as in all domains of learning.
  4. Formulate program outcomes and design curricula that reflect contemporary health care trends and prepare graduates to function effectively in the health care environment.
  5. Function as change agents and leaders to create a preferred future for nursing education and nursing practice.
  6. Maintain competence in the educator role through the commitment to and pursuit of continuous quality improvement.
  7. Engage effectively in scholarship as an integral component of the nurse educator role.

Demonstrate knowledge about the educational environment within which the student practices and recognize how political, institutional, social, and economic forces impact the role of nurse educator.

Note: Adapted from the National League for Nursing Core Competencies of Nurse Educators with Task Statements (2005).

Nurse Administrator Track

Upon completion of the Nurse Administrator track, the graduate will be able to:

  1. Function effectively as a leader within a health care system.
  2. Use systems thinking to evaluate the impact of nursing decisions on the health care organization as a whole.
  3. Apply knowledge of health care policy, regulations, economics, budgeting, and finance to improve organizational effectiveness.
  4. Lead and manage a diverse human workforce.
  5. Develop collaborative relationships within the health care system, the community and academia.
  6. Locate, evaluate and apply best evidence to improve organizational effectiveness and patient outcomes.
  7. Determine patient care quality improvement goals in accordance with national quality initiatives.
  8. Use information systems to access and analyze data for use in planning for patient care and health care system processes.
  9. Apply legal and ethical standards to health care operations.
  10. Facilitate change within health care organizations.

Program of Study for the Master of Science in Nursing Online Degree

The progression of the Master of Science in Nursing curriculum encourages students to further their clinical expertise while developing proficiency in the specialties of Family/Individual across the Lifespan, Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner tracks, and Nurse Educator and Nurse Administrator tracks. Furthermore, all courses are offered online. The credits for the MSN tracks are as follows:

MSN Core Courses

NUR 510 Conceptual and Theoretical Foundations for Nursing (3 credits, 7-week format)

NUR 512 Research for Evidence-Based Nursing Practice (3 credits, 7-week format)

NUR 514 Informatics and Technology in Nursing (3 credits, 7-week format)

NUR 516 Issues and Trends Relevant to Nursing (3 credits, 7-week format)

NUR 520 Vulnerable Populations: Nursing Perspectives (3 credits, 7-week format)

Direct Care Core Courses

NUR 550 Physiology and Pathophysiology for Advanced Practice Nursing Across the Lifespan (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 551 Advanced Health & Physical Assessment Across the Lifespan (3 credits = 2 didactic, 1 lab [56 hours], 14-week format)
NUR 552 Pharmacological Principles of Clinical Therapeutics Across the Lifespan (3 credits, 14-week format)

Specialty Courses

Family/Individual Across the Lifespan Nurse Practitioner
NUR 600 Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan I – Women & Families (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 601 Clinical Practicum Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan I – Women & Families (2 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 602 Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan II - Infants, Children & Adolescents (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 603 Clinical Practicum Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan II – Infants, Children & Adolescents (2 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 604 Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan III - Adults & Older Adults (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 605 Clinical Practicum Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan III – Adults & Older Adults (4 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 606 Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan IV - Adults & Older Adults (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 607 Clinical Practicum Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan IV – Adults & Older Adults (5 credits, 14-week format)

Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner
NUR 609 Advanced Health Assessment & Clinical Reasoning for the Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (3 credits, 14-week format) - 2 credits didactic, 1 credit clinical (56 clock hours)
NUR 610 Adult-Gerontology Diagnosis & Management of Chronic & Acute Illnesses I (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 611 Clinical Practicum Adult-Gerontology Diagnosis & Management of Chronic & Acute Illnesses I (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 612Adult-Gerontology Diagnosis & Management of Chronic & Acute Illnesses-II (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 613 Clinical Practicum Adult-Gerontology Diagnosis & Management of Chronic & Acute Illnesses-II (4 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 614 Adult-Gerontology, Traumatic Injury & Emergency Illnesses Diagnosis & Management (1 credit, 14-week format)
NUR 615 Clinical Residency (5 credits, 14-week format)

Nurse Educator
NUR 531 Curricula in Nursing Education (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 533 Teaching Strategies for the Nurse Educator (4 credits=3 credits didactic and 1 credit clinical [56 clinical hours], 14-week format)
NUR 535 Nurse Educator Practicum (6 credits=3 credits didactic and 3 credits clinical [168 hours], 14-week format)

Nurse Administrator
NUR 541 Nursing Care Delivery Systems (3 credits, 14-week format)
NUR 543 Resources for the Delivery of Nursing (4 credits=3 credits didactic and 1 credit clinical [56 clinical hours], 14-week format)
NUR 545 Nurse Administrator Practicum (6 credits=3 credits didactic and 3 credits clinical [168 hours], 14-week format)

Post Master’s Online Certificates

Cedar Crest College offers Post Master’s Online Certificates in these specialties:
Nursing Education – 13 credits
Nursing Administration – 13 credits
Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner – 22 credits
Family/Individual Across the Lifespan Nurse Practitioner - 25 credits

During the 2017-2018 academic year, the post-master’s certificates are being reviewed by the Middle States Commission on Higher Education for inclusion in Cedar Crest College’s regional accreditation.

Graduates will be eligible to take certification exams as offered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), American Academy of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), and the National League for Nursing (NLN) as applicable to specialty.

Post Master’s Certificate Admission Requirements

The admission criteria for Post Master’s Certificates are as follows:

Post Master’s Certificate Program of Study

Nurse Educator Specialty Courses
NUR 531 Curricula in Nursing Education (3 credits)
NUR 533 Teaching Strategies for the Nurse Educator (4 credits/56 clinical hours)
NUR 535 Nurse Educator Practicum (6 credits/168 clinical hours)

Nurse Administrator Specialty Courses
NUR 541 Nursing Care Delivery Systems (3 credits)
NUR 543 Resources for the Delivery of Nursing (4 credits=3 credits didactic, 1 credit clinical [56 clock hours])
NUR 545 Nurse Administrator Practicum (6 credits=3 credits didactic, 3 credits clinical [168 clock hours])

Family/Individual Across the Lifespan Specialty Courses
NUR 600 Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan I – Women & Families (3 credits)
NUR 601 Clinical Practicum Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan I – Women & Families (2 credits) – 112 clock hours
NUR 602 Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan II - Infants, Children & Adolescents (3 credits)
NUR 603 Clinical Practicum Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan II – Infants, Children & Adolescents (2 credits) – 112 clock hours
NUR 604 Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan III - Adults & Older Adults (3 credits)
NUR 605 Clinical Practicum Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan III – Adults & Older Adults (4 credits) – 224 clock hours
NUR 606 Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan IV - Adults & Older Adults (3 credits)
NUR 607 Clinical Practicum Primary Care of the Family & Individual Across the Lifespan IV – Adults & Older Adults (5 credits) – 280 clock hours

Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Specialty Courses
NUR 609 Advanced Health Assessment & Clinical Reasoning for the Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner (3 credits=2 credits didactic, 1 credit clinical [56 clock hours])
NUR 610 Adult-Gerontology Diagnosis & Management of Chronic & Acute Illnesses I (3 credits)
NUR 611 Clinical Practicum Adult-Gerontology Diagnosis & Management of Chronic & Acute Illnesses I (3 credits) - 168 clock hours
NUR 612 Adult-Gerontology Diagnosis & Management of Chronic & Acute Illnesses-II (3 credits)
NUR 613 Clinical Practicum Adult-Gerontology Diagnosis & Management of Chronic & Acute Illnesses-II (4 credits) - 224 clock hours
NUR 614 Adult-Gerontology, Traumatic Injury & Emergency Illnesses Diagnosis & Management (1 credit)
NUR 615 Clinical Residency (5 credits) - 280 clock hours (20 hours/week)

Master’s-Level Pre-Requisite Curricular Requirements for Nurse Practitioner Post Master’s Certificates

Post-master’s certificate nurse-practitioner students must have satisfactorily completed master-degree-level courses in advanced pathophysiology, advanced health assessment, and advanced pharmacology that are equivalent to courses in the Cedar Crest College MSN curriculum (NUR 550, 551, 552). Students may be required to submit a course description and a course syllabus to verify such equivalency. Post-master’s certificate nurse-practitioner students who have not satisfactorily completed such courses may be required to complete them as part of their certificate curriculum, based upon a review by the Department of Nursing.

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program

The Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) program is a practice-focused program in nursing. The DNP prepares expert nurse clinicians and executive leaders for the highest level of practice to improve health outcomes for individuals and populations. Graduates will be employed in primary care settings, hospitals, and other acute care settings, public health agencies, and schools of nursing.

Mission of the Graduate Nursing Program

The mission of the Cedar Crest College graduate nursing program is to educate and prepare nurse leaders who will advance evidence-based practice, education, and healthcare delivery to improve health outcomes for individuals, families, and communities within a global context.

BSN-DNP Family/Individual Across the Lifespan Nurse Practitioner
BSN-DNP Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner

Cedar Crest College currently offers two tracks within the DNP program: Family/Individual Across the Lifespan Nurse Practitioner and Adult-Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner. Credits for the DNP program vary depending on track. After completing the coursework for the Master of Science in Nursing degree, students can smoothly transition into the doctoral program, where they will take advanced DNP courses that provide content on working in complex health systems and advanced clinical courses.

The BSN-DNP program curriculum begins with foundational courses such as Research for Evidence-based Practice. Students then take advanced practice core courses of advanced physiology and pathophysiology across the lifespan, advanced health assessment across the lifespan, and advanced pharmacology across the Lifespan. Advanced practice clinical courses build on these foundational advanced practice core courses. Clinical practicums and role components are integrated in the advanced core and specialty courses. Finally, students take advanced DNP courses that provide content on working in complex health systems and advanced clinical courses. A curricular emphasis on evidence-based practice prepares graduate students to translate and integrate current best practices, contribute to nursing’s unique body of knowledge, and advance the profession of nursing. All DNP students must complete and successfully defend a scholarly inquiry practice project and complete a minimum of 1,000 hours of post-baccalaureate clinical hours.

Doctor of Nursing Practice Program Goals and Student Learning Outcomes

Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Program Goals

The DNP curriculum for BSN or MSN prepared students is designed with courses sequentially organized to promote student achievement of program outcomes. Student learning outcomes in each course guide the selection of learning activities and evaluation methods throughout the curriculum. Each course builds on the knowledge, skills, and abilities students developed in previous course work. Over the plan of study in the DNP program, students are expected to attain the following five overarching goals:

  1. Evaluate health outcomes of individuals, communities, and populations in complex
  2. healthcare systems through evidence-based practice.
  3. Integrate theoretical and scientific knowledge to provide high quality health care that is ethical, safe, and evidence-based to diverse individuals, communities, and populations.
  4. Translate evidence to guide practice and improve health outcomes and systems of care.
  5. Influence healthcare policy relative to social, ethical, legal, economic, and political issues that impact nursing.
  6. Direct high quality, cost-effective care in collaborative relationships with other health care providers.

DNP Student Learning Outcomes

Graduates of the DNP program will be able to:

  1. Develop cost-effective innovations to improve health through the synthesis of theoretical, philosophical, ethical, and empirical knowledge.
  2. Utilize leadership skills within complex health systems to improve safe, cost-effective, and quality healthcare for diverse populations.
  3. Act as a practice scholar to design, implement, and translate evidence to promote safe, timely, effective, efficient, equitable, and patient-centered care.
  4. Engage in evidence-based advanced-nursing practice and evaluate innovative approaches to care delivery for individuals, communities and populations.
  5. Utilize and evaluate health information systems for improvement and transformation of clinical, research, and administrative practices.
  6. Employ strategic leadership skills to analyze, develop, and implement health care policy on local, regional, national, and global levels.
  7. Partner with others to develop interactive interprofessional collaborative teams to improve health outcomes among diverse populations.

Program of Study for the Doctor of Nursing Practice Online Degree

Program Length

The length of the DNP program varies by entry point. Additionally, the curriculum can be individualized based on students’ prior education, experience, and choice of specialization.

Post-master students with an ARNP certificate can expect to spend a minimum of six semesters engaged in part-time study at the doctoral level. Post-baccalaureate DNP students in the nurse practitioner track can expect a part-time program length of six calendar years. The number of credit hours for a post-baccalaureate student varies by specialization.

DNP Courses

NUR 801 Methods for Scholarly Inquiry (3 credits)
NUR 802 Biostatistics for Evidence-based Practice (3 credits)
NUR 803 Theories of Leadership & Organization (3 credits)
NUR 804 Health Policy, Economics, & Finance (3 credits)
NUR 805 Foundation for Transformation: Translating Evidence into Practice (3 credits)
NUR 806 Evaluation Methods for Safety & Quality Improvement (3 credits)
NUR 850 DNP Leadership Practicum I (4 credits) - 1 didactic credit, 3 clinical
NUR 851 DNP Leadership Practicum II (4 credits) - 1 didactic credit, 3 clinical
NUR 852 DNP Project (2 credits)
NUR 853 DNP Project – Maintenance of Candidacy (1 credit)

On Campus Immersion Experiences

Nurse Educator and Nurse Administrator Tracks

The Nurse Educator and Nurse Administrator tracks at Cedar Crest College include an On Campus Immersion Experience which provides students with the opportunity to become familiar with campus resources, meet faculty, and network with peers.

The On Campus Immersion will be held at Cedar Crest in August for students beginning their studies in the fall semester. It will be a 2-3 day experience. For students entering the program in the spring or summer semesters, the immersion will be conducted online.

Nurse Practitioner Tracks

The Nurse Practitioner tracks at Cedar Crest College include On Campus Immersion Experiences which provide students with the opportunity to meet faculty, network with peers, practice clinical skills in our state-of-the-art simulation settings and learn and grow as advanced practitioners.

The On Campus Immersions will be held in August-Year One and October-Year Two for the FNP track and in August-Year One, October-Year Two, October-Year Three for the AG-ACNP track. They will be a 2-3 day experience.

Clearances

Upon admission into the Master of Science in Nursing or Doctor of Nursing Practice program, students will be required to submit the following documents:

*Clearances must be completed the semester prior to the first clinical practicum course. Information will be sent to students regarding clearances several months prior to the deadline.

Prospective and current students with criminal records must disclose their record and schedule a meeting with the Nursing Department Chairperson upon admission to or throughout progression at Cedar Crest College.

Any student not clinically cleared for clinical courses by the last day of the add/drop period will be automatically dropped from the course. Late clearances cannot be accepted.

Provisional Acceptance

Provisional acceptance will be considered for students who do not meet all admission criteria. Once granted provisional acceptance into the program, the student must maintain a 3.0 GPA in the first 6 credits. Provisional acceptance is intended to allow students the opportunity to verify their level of readiness for graduate study.

Visiting Student

Candidates may apply as a non-degree visiting student and take a maximum of 6 credits from the MSN Core or Direct Care Core courses. Upon completion of those credits, the student must apply for admission.

Matriculation

Matriculation is required for any student who plans to receive financial aid and/or a graduate degree. A student applies for matriculation by submitting a completed application for admission to the School of Adult and Graduate Education. After submitting a complete application, students receive a letter from the College informing them of the decision concerning their acceptance as a degree candidate. Students are matriculated into the program once they have registered for classes during their first semester of academic study.

Graduate programs may permit non-matriculated and visiting students to enroll in graduate courses on a case-by-case basis. In the event that a graduate course reaches its enrollment maximum, matriculated students are given preference over non-matriculated students.

Transfer Credit Policy

Students entering the program may transfer up to 6 credits of coursework. The transferred coursework, however, must be equivalent to courses listed in the curriculum and must have been completed within five years of the date of enrollment in the program (the first day of classes of a student’s first academic year). In order for course work to be considered for transfer students must submit a course description, course syllabus if available, and transcript indicating the student’s achieved grade for the course. Once matriculated in the program, students will not receive any credit for coursework taken at another institution.

Graduate Nursing Program Progression Policy

Earning a grade lower than B constitutes a course failure and the course must be repeated as follows:

  1. Grade lower than B in any MSN Core or Direct Care Core Course*
    (a) Students may take other MSN Core or Direct Care Core Course(s) in order to facilitate progression.
    (b) The student must repeat the failed course at the next course offering.
  2. Grade lower than B in FNP, AGACNP, Nurse Educator, and Nurse Administrator Specialty Courses**
    (a) Students may not progress and must repeat the course earning a letter grade of B or higher.
    (b) The student must repeat the failed course at the next course offering.

The student will be dismissed from the graduate nursing program if unsuccessful earning the required grade of B after repeating a course. A course may be repeated only one time. Only two courses in the graduate nursing program may be repeated.

*MSN Core Courses – NUR 510, 512, 514, 516
Direct Care Core Courses – NUR 550, 551, 552

**Specialty Courses
FNP Specialty Courses – NUR 600, 601, 602, 603, 604, 605, 606, 607
AGACNP Specialty Courses – NUR 609, 610, 611, 612, 613, 614, 615
Nurse Educator Specialty Courses – NUR 531, 533, 535
Nurse Administrator Courses – NUR 541, 543, 545

Leaves of Absence

Students wishing to take a leave of absence from the program may request to do so in writing to the Director of the Graduate Nursing program. The granting of the requested leave is at the discretion of the Director and the Graduate Nursing Program Committee. A granted leave of absence has no bearing on the maximum period of candidacy.

Completion of the Graduate Program and Graduation

To successfully complete the Master of Science in Nursing Program, a student must adhere to the following:

Graduate 2017-2018 Tuition and Fees

Master of Science in Nursing Application fee (non-refundable) $30.00

Nursing Graduate Tuition, per credit $825.00

Full-Time/Part-Time Student Activity Fee, per semester $20.00

Full-Time Technology Fee, per semester $100.00

Part-Time Technology Fee, per semester $50.00

Evidence-based Practice Project Fee (NUR 559) $ 150.00

Expenses

Graduate nursing students are responsible for all fees involved when obtaining the clinical requirements, secured electronic file management, clinical attire, equipment, books, and professional and scholarly activities. Note: The College reserves the right to change fees and charges as necessary.

Graduate Assistantships in Nursing

Graduate assistantships are designed to promote the educational goals and objectives of the Master’s program by providing students with opportunities to actively participate in a range of instructional and research activities that serve to promote mastery of knowledge in the field of nursing science. To this end, graduate assistants are placed with individual graduate nursing faculty and may participate in one or more of the following learning experiences:

Students wishing to apply for a graduate assistantship are asked to do so as part of the admissions process or can apply directly through the Director of the Graduate Nursing Program. To be eligible to receive an assistantship, a student must:

Assistantships are awarded on a competitive basis by the Director of the Graduate Nursing Program in consultation with the Graduate Nursing Committee and faculty to whom graduate assistants will be assigned. Students may apply for a part time assistantship (60 hours per semester) or a full time assistantship (120 hours). The number of assistantships available in any given academic year and the stipend to be awarded to each graduate assistant is determined by the Director in consultation with the Associate Provost of The School of Adult and Graduate Education and the Provost. The decision of the Director in regard to award recipients is final and is not subject to appeal.

Advising

A student accepted to the Master of Science in Nursing Program will be assigned an academic advisor who will work with the student in planning the program of study, and as a mentor for professional development. Faculty advisors are assigned by the Director of the Graduate Nursing Program. Students wishing to request a specific faculty advisor, should submit this request in writing to the Director.

Information Resources

Master of Science in Nursing Program "My Cedar Crest" virtual group

Upon acceptance into the program and registration for courses, new students are sent an invitation to join the My Cedar Crest group specifically reserved for students in the graduate nursing program. This website contains important information including access to the program handbooks, hyperlinks to a variety of College resources, list of current affiliation agreements for clinical placement, and more.

Graduate Nursing Program Orientation Manual

The Graduate Nursing Program Orientation Manual is provided to students. In-depth instruction related to Information Technology services and how to access email, the learning management system, and My Cedar Crest are provided. There is also information on literature searches and the Library services, tutoring and The Writing Center, and online access to writing experts via Smart Thinking. Contact numbers for key personnel and student campus information are included for convenience.

Graduate Student Handbook

Each student has access to the Graduate Nursing Student Handbook for the Master of Science in Nursing Program. The purpose of the handbook is to provide students with information pertaining to the curricular requirements, policies and procedures associated with the program. Students are responsible for familiarizing themselves and understanding the information presented in the Nursing Department Graduate Handbook. Questions regarding the content of the handbook should be directed to either the student’s faculty advisor or the Director of the Graduate Nursing Program.

Funding for Professional Development

The Graduate Nursing program at Cedar Crest College provides funding to support student led professional learning projects that have a significant impact on the nursing profession through the Dollars for Scholars Program.
Students may apply for awards of up to $500.00 to support professional development and scholarship when presenting an oral presentation or poster at a forum that is directly related to course content as determined by the Graduate Nursing Faculty Committee. These funds may be used for conference registration, travel expenses, or printing of the poster.

In order to be considered for a Graduate Nursing Dollars for Scholars Award students must meet the following requirements:

Lillian S. Brunner Master of Science in Nursing Award

The Lillian S. Brunner Master of Science in Nursing Award is presented to the graduating student in the Master of Science in Nursing program who has exemplified the highest standards of graduate level scholarship through exceptional writing, scholarly discourse and the translation of current best evidence into nursing practice. The award is presented yearly in May at the College's Awards Ceremony. Students who have completed the program in August are eligible to receive the award in the following May. The recipient is determined by members of the Graduate Nursing Program Committee.

Sigma Theta Tau, The International Nursing Honor Society Theta Rho Chapter

The Cedar Crest College Nursing Honor Society was established in the Spring of 1981. The first group was inducted into the Society on April 23, 1981. Through the efforts of many Society members, by-laws were developed according to the recommendations of Sigma Theta Tau, the International Honor Society for Nursing. In April 1986, the Nursing Honor Society was chartered as Theta Rho Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau.

As described in the Chapter by-laws, the purposes of the Nursing Honor Society are to: recognize superior achievement, recognize the development of leadership qualities, foster high professional standards, encourage creative work, and strengthen commitment to the ideals and purposes of the profession.

To apply for membership in the Theta Rho Chapter, the graduate student must meet the following criteria:

Graduate students who meet eligibility criteria may apply for membership online at www.nursingsocitey.org. Theta Rho will review the application and notify the candidate of their acceptance. The Induction Ceremony is held in the Spring semester.

 

 


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