Traditional Programs Adult Programs Course Descriptions Graduate Catalog

Registration and Class Information

Abandoning a Class

A student who simply stops attending class without completing the paper work to drop or withdraw from the course will receive a grade of “F” for the course and will be financially responsible for all charges associated with the class.

Academic Advising

Students meet with their faculty advisors to discuss academic goals and interests as well as to make course selections each semester. Traditional students who have achieved fewer than 54.9 credits are required to meet with an advisor prior to registration.

Academic Credit Totals

The standard program of study is five courses or 15 academic credits per semester. For determining full-time or part-time status and assessing fees, however, 12 credit hours constitute a full-time load. No student is permitted to schedule an academic credit overload (over 21 credits) without permission of the Director of Student Success and Retention or Registrar. Courses from which a student withdraws impacts student financial aid; students who wish to withdraw from a course should consult with an advisor and a member of Student Financial Services. Students registering for over 19 credit hours will be assessed an overload fee. Exceptions to this policy are applied music courses, study abroad courses with a travel component paid for by the student, Performing Arts productions and practicum, Dance Company, Forensic Speech Team, Crestiad, independent research credits, and athletics. In addition, credits of courses taken to fulfill scholarship requirements in Dance, Performing Arts, Literature and Writing, Communication, Business and Forensic Speech will not be counted.

Attendance Policy

Regular attendance at classes is expected of all students, regardless of whether attendance is a factor in the student’s grade for a course. If attendance is used to compute the final grades for the course, that fact must be reflected in the course syllabus. For courses requiring a final exam, students are required to attend the exam, on the day and time scheduled by the Registrar’s Office.

When an academic or extracurricular activity is scheduled in conflict with a class, the class takes precedence; however, arrangements with the instructor may be made in advance to enable students to attend the conflicting activity. Student absences due to participation in institutionally approved events such as intercollegiate athletics, theatrical or musical performances, academic conference, or field trips must be verified by the event’s sponsor (e.g. coach or faculty member). Participation in such events does not constitute an automatic excused absence from classes. The instructor may require student attendance if, in the context of the course, this appears to be in the student’s best interest, based on the student’s academic standing and current performance in the course. In any case, the student is responsible to inform the instructor in writing of an anticipated absence at the start of the semester or the official start of each athletic/performance season. A general form for Student Participation in College Sponsored Events is available on the College website, and may be used in the planning of such absences. Students are responsible for making up any classwork missed for a verified absence.

Students who are aware of potential conflicts due to college-sanctioned activities should report and discuss these conflicts as soon as they are known. The College encourages students to participate in sanctioned activities and encourages faculty to make arrangements to facilitate these experiences where possible.

When there is a conflict between two scheduled events and the professors in charge cannot come to an agreement, the student shall be protected by the provost, who shall require the two professors to resolve the matter at a joint meeting with the provost.

Students who are absent from classes for illness, a family emergency, a death in the family, military service, jury duty, or other legitimate reasons must notify their instructors. A calendar of annual religious holidays maintained by the Center for Diversity and Inclusion will serve as notice to all faculty for students absent due to religious observance. Students must also contact the Office of the Vice President of Student Affairs and Traditional Enrollment, who will then verify the reason for the absence and notify the student’s instructor. Faculty members who receive such notification should understand that the notification signifies that the information given by the student is creditable; the notification does not, however, serve to exempt students from any of their course requirements. Faculty members should develop policies for excusing students who miss classes or coursework for reasons beyond their control and should inform students about these policies.

Religious Observation

Cedar Crest College supports students from a diversity of faith traditions. When a religious observation conflicts with a scheduled class, students should report and discuss the conflict with their faculty at the beginning of the semester and work with the instructor to make the necessary arrangements to ensure the course requirements are met. This link provides a list of religious holidays permitting absence. http://www.state.nj.us/education/genfo/holidays1617.pdf

Auditing

A full-time traditional Cedar Crest student may, with the permission of the instructor, audit a course without added tuition charge on a space-available basis. All others, with the permission of the instructor, may enroll as auditors for a tuition charge. In such courses as studio arts, laboratory sciences, computer sciences and applied music, appropriate fees may be charged to all students as applicable. Registration for audits is through the registrar’s office. A grade of “S” (satisfactory) or “U” (unsatisfactory) is recorded for auditing. An auditor is not required to take examinations and is accorded only such class participation as the instructor may offer. A student may, with the permission of the instructor, change from audit to credit until the end of the second (2nd) week of classes (deadlines for accelerated, winter terms, and summer sessions differ). It is the student’s responsibility to make up any assignments the student may have been exempt from as an auditor. Adjustment of fees to the level of full course cost will be made where applicable. A student may, with the permission of the instructor, change from credit to audit up until the deadline for withdrawing from courses. No refund will be given in the case of a registration change from credit to audit.

Bachelor’s Degree Requirements and Procedures

To earn a bachelor’s degree from Cedar Crest College, each student must:

(Please note that some majors require a cumulative GPA higher than 2.000. Check department requirements for details.)

Class Standing

A student’s class standing is determined by the student’s number of earned credits as certified in the registrar’s office at the beginning of each term.

Freshman 0-23.9 earned credits 

Sophomore 24-54.9 earned credits 

Junior 55-85.9 earned credits 

Senior 86 or more earned credits

Classroom Protocol

a. Learning Environment and Appropriate Classroom Behavior

Cedar Crest College maintains a classroom and learning environment dedicated to scholarly, artistic and professional inquiry. The College’s community of learning is founded upon the intellectual freedom of students and faculty in pursuit of knowledge and understanding. Such an environment depends upon the insights of the liberal arts disciplines, as well as a respect for the global diversity of viewpoints and cultural backgrounds.
The College expects students to conduct themselves in a manner that best realizes their own and other students’ education. Appropriate classroom behavior includes, but is not limited to, the expectations for students: to attend and be prepared for all classes, to arrive and leave on time, to treat the faculty members and other students with respect, to refrain from any activities within the classroom that do not directly pertain to the business of the class, to use language that is respectful and non-abusive, and to otherwise refrain from any behavior that disrupts or jeopardizes the learning environment as determined by a reasonable faculty member. Academic programs or individual faculty members may establish additional behavioral policies for their courses, including those which take classroom behavior into account for a student’s academic evaluation.
If a student would like to bring a guest to class, permission must be secured from the instructor prior to that class time.

b. Response to Disruptive Classroom Behavior

Faculty members are entitled to respond to disruptive student behavior. Responses can range from a verbal warning to requiring the student to leave class. Faculty may further choose to treat dismissal from class as an absence for the purposes of attendance policies. If a student refuses to leave when requested, the faculty member is to call campus security and have the student removed. Unless it should be necessary to protect oneself, the faculty member should not make any effort or threat to remove the student physically.

If the faculty member desires that the expulsion extend beyond the class period or that it be permanent, the faculty member must first notify the chair of his or her department, and then make such a request to the provost prior to the beginning of the next meeting of that class. If the provost concurs, the student is to be notified of procedures by which she may appeal. Under some circumstances, some disruptive classroom behavior may warrant dismissal from the College.

c. Notification of Classroom Protocol

Faculty members are expected to make clear expectations for specific classroom decorum and repercussions for non-compliance, including the impact disruptive behavior may have on students’ academic evaluation. Faculty members should be aware of setting boundaries and procedures for exceptions to policies stated in the syllabus.

The following statement (or similar language) should be conveyed to students at the start of each term: “Appropriate classroom behavior is implicit in the Cedar Crest College Honor Code. Such behavior is defined and guided by complete protection for the rights of all students and faculty to a respectful classroom environment. That environment is free from distractions such as late arrivals, early departures, inappropriate conversations and any other behaviors that might disrupt instruction and/or compromise students’ access to their Cedar Crest College education.”

Conditional Standing

The faculty at Cedar Crest College have adopted the following policy concerning conditional standing and separation from the College:

The dismissal procedure includes the opportunity to petition the Academic Policies and Standards Committee for continuation.

A student dismissed for unsatisfactory academic achievement may petition the Academic Policies and Standards Committee for re-admission; this petition must include an explanation of the factors that contributed to the student’s academic performance, official documentation verifying the impact of these factors, and a plan for returning to good academic standing, including any specific academic work or equivalent experience anticipated or completed during the interval between dismissal and re-admission.

Once re-admitted to the College, the student must achieve a grade-point average of 2.000 or better every semester to remain. If a student is dismissed a second time, there is no appeal.

Cross-registration within LVAIC

Full-time traditional students, other than first-year students in their first semester, who are in good academic standing may register for courses at other institutions of the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges (LVAIC), provided those courses are not available to them at Cedar Crest. (Other LVAIC participating institutions are DeSales University, Lafayette College, Lehigh University, Moravian College and Muhlenberg College.) Traditional students will pay the comprehensive tuition to their home institution, but may be required to pay applicable fees to the host institution. Transportation is the student’s responsibility.

Student teaching is not available through the LVAIC cross-registration policy. For more information regarding the LVAIC policy, contact the Registrar.

Cross-Registration with OCICU

Traditional students, who are in good academic standing may register for online courses offered through the Online Consortium of Independent Colleges and Universities (OCICU), during the summer sessions only, provided that a suitable course that meets the academic needs of a student is not available at Cedar Crest.

Students will pay the applicable Cedar Crest College tuition rate, but may be required to pay additional fees to the host institution. Details and forms for cross-registration are available on My Cedar Crest or in the Registrar’s Office.

All credits and grades earned via OCICU courses will be computed into the student’s cumulative average. Credits earned via OCICU courses will not be treated as transfer credits.

If students want to use an OCICU course to satisfy a degree, certificate, or general education requirement, they must receive approval in advance from their academic advisor and the appropriate Department Chair at Cedar Crest. Student teaching and field experiences may not be satisfied through the OCIUC cross-registration policy.

Individual departments reserve the right to determine how and whether students may use OCIUC courses to satisfy academic requirements for majors, minors, masters and certificate programs.

Dean's List and Honors

Dean’s List: Dean’s List is awarded each fall and spring to any full-time matriculated student who receives a semester average of at least 3.650 on the basis of at least 12 credits for which the student receives letter grades and quality points. A student who has an incomplete grade during a semester will not be eligible for the inclusion on the Dean’s List.

Students enrolled for fewer than 12 graded credits each semester are considered part-time students for the purposes of Dean’s List recognition. Appointment to the Dean’s List is made when

Dean’s List status for part-time students is recorded on the most recently completed semester during which all cumulative criteria were met. Once awarded, the calculation for additional recognition begins anew.

Delphi: Delphi is the College honor society. Students who, upon completion of 86 or more total credits, 60 of which have to be graded credits of academic work at Cedar Crest, have a cumulative grade-point average of 3.800 will be recognized as members of Delphi.

Honor Societies: Cedar Crest sponsors chapters of the following national or international honor societies:

Graduation with Honors: A student is considered for graduation honors if the student’s cumulative average at Cedar Crest is 3.550 or better and includes at least 60 graded Cedar Crest (excluding courses taken on a pass/fail basis) credits. The awarding of honors is based on all graded work done at Cedar Crest (including dual degree programs) and graded work completed at other LVAIC institutions as a matriculated Cedar Crest student and is for undergraduate students only.

Students with a cumulative average of 3.550 or above at the end of four years graduate cum laude; those with an average of 3.650 or above graduate magna cum laude; those with an average of 3.800 or above graduate summa cum laude. Students should consult the registrar’s office to determine their status.

Declaration of Dual Degrees

A Cedar Crest graduate may be awarded a second bachelor’s degree, either B.A. or B.S., if the student completes a minimum of 30 additional approved credits at Cedar Crest with a cumulative grade-point average of at least 2.0 and satisfies the requirements for an additional major. A student may pursue a second bachelor’s degree to be awarded either at the same time as the first degree or at a time subsequent to the awarding of the first degree, provided that the pursuit of the second degree reflects a second distinct and comprehensive program of study. The option for the second bachelor’s degree is limited to the departmental majors and programs listed in the catalog.

Study Leading to a Second Degree: A student who has earned a baccalaureate or associate’s degree at an accredited institution may pursue a program of study leading to a second degree at Cedar Crest College. Credits earned as part of the first degree will be evaluated for applicability toward major requirements and liberal arts curriculum requirements. The student must satisfy all graduation requirements and adhere to all other academic policies.

Declaration of Major and Minors

Students should declare their major any time after the completion of their first semester of study or 12–15 earned credits. Transfer students are encouraged to declare their major after the completion of 24 credits at Cedar Crest.  
All required Pennsylvania State Basic Skills Exams must be passed prior to the admission to the Teacher Education Program.  Students are required to present evidence of passing exam scores to the Education Department to initiate the Declaration of Major process.  Students holding a BA or BS degree are not required to take the Basic Skills Exams.  An education major may be declared after 3 semesters of full-time study or 45 credits.  The students must have and maintain a 3.0 GPA.
PDE Current Basic Skills Tests are the PAPA and PA CORE.  Contact the Education Office for more information.

Students enrolling in the School of Adult and Graduate Education are permitted to declare their major upon matriculation into the College.

The official declaration of a major is initiated with a form available from the Registrar’s Office. Students declaring a major that may lead to either the B.S. or B.A. degree shall specify at the time of declaration which program they are entering and which degree they are seeking. Students must satisfy a minimum of 18 credits of major requirements through Cedar Crest College coursework. Individual departments may specify higher residency requirements for major coursework or establish further restrictions on the types of transfer credits accepted toward major requirements. Students will graduate according to the major requirements listed in the College catalog and in effect at the time they enter the College, provided the students declare their major within four years of matriculation. After four years, the student will graduate under the requirements in effect at the time of declaration. If the requirements for the major change after a student has declared a major, students may choose to graduate according to curricular changes enacted by the Faculty and stipulated in subsequent catalogs.

Any change in major, including change of B.S. or B.A. program within the same department, shall be processed through the Registrar’s Office and have departmental approval. Students should consult with academic departments for any departmental specific declaration requirements.

Declaration of a self-designed major: Matriculated students may design their own major and seek its approval from the Committee on Undergraduate Education (CUE). Such proposals will only be considered if the courses required are available at Cedar Crest or within the LVAIC and meet the standards for an academic major at Cedar Crest. A formal petition shall be made indicating her expected degree and be approved by the relevant Department Chairperson before submission to CUE. For information, see the Registrar. Students are required to declare a self-designed major by the time they have completed 90 credits.

Declaration of more than one major: Students may complete requirements for more than one major. Students declaring additional majors shall indicate one as their primary major. The primary major shall determine the degree to be awarded, i.e., B.S. or B.A.

Declaration of an academic minor: Some departments offer minors. Completion of a minor is optional if it is not required for graduation. A student initiates declaration of a minor with the completion of a form available from the Registrar’s Office. A minor must be a minimum of 18 credits with one-half taken at Cedar Crest College. No course with a grade of less than C-may be counted to satisfy a minor requirement. Some departments have higher requirements. A course taken Pass/Fail will not satisfy a minor requirement unless it is a course offered on a Pass/Fail basis only.

Matriculated students may design their own minor and seek its approval from the Committee on Undergraduate Education (CUE). A formal petition shall be made, including required documentation as set forth by the Registrar, and be approved by the relevant Department Chairperson before submission to CUE. Students are required to declare a self-designed minor by the time they have completed 90 credits. A minor must include a minimum of 18 credits with half the credits taken at Cedar Crest College. No more than 3 credits may be completed in independent study. All policies pertaining to a minor apply to the self-designed minor.

Declaration of concentration/certification: A student declares a concentration or certificate by completing the appropriate form available from the Registrar's Office.

Concentrations are focused areas of study within an academic major and are contingent upon completion of bachelor degree requirements. Academic departments establish the curriculum for a concentration within a major's requirement.

Certificates are focused areas of study that provide postsecondary non-degree credentials. A certificate program must include a minimum of 12 credits. At least 12 credits of a certificate must be completed at Cedar Crest College, although departments may require a higher number of residency credits. No course with a grade of less than C- may be counted to satisfy a certificate requirement, and some departments require that a grade higher than C- be achieved per course for the certificate. A course taken Pass/Fail will not satisfy a certificate requirement unless it is a course offered on a Pass/Fail basis only.

Academic major course requirements: A course with a grade of C- or better may be counted to satisfy a major requirement. Some departments have higher requirements. Students should consult with individual departments for exact requirements. A course taken Pass/Fail will not satisfy a major requirement unless it is a course offered by the department on a Pass/Fail basis only. The minimum cumulative grade-point average for coursework in the major is 2.000. Some departments require a higher cumulative GPA in the major.

If a student re-enters the College to continue a major after an official leave of absence greater than one academic year, the student will graduate according to major requirements in effect at the time of re-enrollment. A student may complete more than one major within one degree.

Dropping/Adding a Course

Drop/Add Period: Students may add a course only during the first week of the course, space permitting. Students may drop a class during the drop/add period, or prior to the start of the class without the drop appearing on students’ transcript. Dropping one or more classes may affect a student’s eligibility for financial aid; students should visit the Student Financial Services office for information.

Grades and Quality Points

Letter grades are used to designate academic achievement, with accompanying quality points:

A = 4.0 quality points 

A- = 3.7 quality points 

B+ = 3.3 quality points 

B = 3.0 quality points 

B- = 2.7 quality points 

C+ = 2.3 quality points 

C = 2.0 quality points 

C- = 1.7 quality points 

D+ = 1.3 quality points 

D = 1.0 quality points 

F = 0 quality points

The following grades have no accompanying quality points and are not computed in the grade-point average:

P = Pass, a course taken as Pass/Fail 

S = Satisfactory (Audit) 

PN = Pass, no grade 

U = Unsatisfactory (Audit) 

W = Withdrew before official deadline 

CR/NC = Credit/No Credit

The grade-point average is computed at the completion of each academic semester and summer session for those courses taken at Cedar Crest College.

For example, a student who has registered for 15 credits in a given semester would calculate his/her GPA in the following manner:

3 credits of A : 3 x 4 = 12.0 

3 credits of B+: 3 x 3.3 = 9.9 

3 credits of B : 3 x 3 = 9.0 

3 credits of C : 3 x 2 = 6.0 

3 credits of D+: 3 x 1.3 = 3.9 

Total credits: 15
Total quality points: 40.8 

40.8 / 15 = 2.72 GPA = 2.720

Total quality points for each course are calculated by multiplying the number of course credits by the quality points for the grade earned. The average is calculated by dividing the total credits attempted into the total quality points earned.

Students may repeat a course. Third-time repeats require Registrar’s approval. Some departments have their own policies regarding repeating a course.

Once the course is repeated, the higher grade earned is computed into the student’s grade point average. Both grades appear on the permanent record.

Repeating one or more classes may affect a student’s satisfactory academic progress requirement for receipt of financial aid; the student should visit the financial aid office for information.

Grade of Incomplete

A temporary grade of Incomplete (I) may be requested by a student who, for reasons beyond the student’s control, is not able to complete the course requirements by the deadline for submitting grades. The faculty member will determine if the student is eligible to be granted an incomplete based on attendance, performance, and progress in the course. At any point prior to the date grades are due, the student and instructor should work out the terms of the incomplete and then the instructor may assign a grade of “I” via the grade entry portlet on MyCedarCrest. The student must complete the work within 6 weeks from the date grades were due or a grade of F will automatically be recorded.

In cases involving unusual circumstances, such as sickness or injury, a member of Academic Services may request an Incomplete on the student’s behalf. Once the work is complete, the instructor will submit the final grade to the Registrar’s Office via the online procedure no later than 6 weeks after the date grades were due. This grade will be based on the work the student completed during the regular semester and any work submitted between the end of the semester and the six week deadline. Book IV, Section C.8.g details the change of grade procedure.

If the faculty member does not approve the request for an incomplete, the student may follow the grade appeal process given in Book IV, Section C.16.

Pass/Fail option: A student may not use a course taken on a pass/fail basis to satisfy major, minor, or liberal education requirements unless the course is offered only on a pass/fail basis. Students may enroll for courses on a pass/fail basis up to 25 percent of the total of their Cedar Crest work applicable for graduation, in addition to courses offered only as pass/fail.

A first-year student may enroll in no more than two pass/fail courses per term.

Instructors are not informed that a student is enrolled as pass/fail. Letter grades are submitted and are recorded as pass/fail in the registrar’s office. In order to receive a “Pass,” the student must receive a grade of D or higher.
Pass (P) is not computed in the grade-point average; the student receives credit only. Fail (F) is computed as an F in the grade-point average; the student receives no credit.

Changing course registration from graded credit to Pass/Fail: Students who wish to change their registration from graded credit to pass/fail must complete this change in registration by the end of the twelfth (12th) week of the fall or spring semester. (Deadlines for accelerated, winter term, and summer sessions differ and will be announced to students and advisors.) This change is permanent and may not be reversed. Students may not change from Pass/Fail to graded credit.

Graduation

Declaration of Intent to Graduate: All students are required to apply for graduation in order to complete a degree or certificate program. Students must complete the online application (located on MyCedarCrest) declaring their intent to graduate before the deadlines indicated below:

January Graduation: Apply by August 1 of the previous calendar year
May Graduation: Apply by December 1 of the previous calendar year
August Graduation: Apply by April 1 of the same calendar year

After submission of the application to graduate, a degree audit will be generated by the Registrar’s Office for each student with a copy sent to the student and the faculty advisor listing total academic credit requirements for graduation which have been fulfilled.

Honor Code

Cedar Crest College students should uphold community standards for academic and social behavior in order to preserve a learning environment dedicated to personal and academic excellence. Upholding community standards is a matter of personal integrity and honor. Individuals who accept the honor of membership in the Cedar Crest College community pledge to accept responsibility for their actions in all academic and social situations and the effect their actions may have on other members of the college community.

Honor Code Principles

Honor Code Pledge

“We who accept the honor of membership in the Cedar Crest College community recognize our obligation to act, and encourage others to act, with honor. The honor code exists to promote an atmosphere in which the individual makes her own decisions, develops a regard for the system under which she lives, and achieves a sense of integrity and judgment in all aspects of her life. It is with faith in such a system that I have accepted membership into this community. Representative of such, I hereby pledge to uphold the spirit and the letter of the honor code.”

Academic Standards of Integrity

In keeping with the honor code, academic integrity and ethical behavior provide the foundations of the Cedar Crest scholarly community and the basis for our learning environment. Cedar Crest College expects students to set a high standard for themselves to be personally and intellectually honest and to ensure that other students do the same. This standard applies to all academic work (oral, written or visual) completed as part of a Cedar Crest education.

Academic Misconduct

Cedar Crest College considers the following acts, but not only the following acts, to be breaches of its academic standard of integrity. Cedar Crest College reserves the right to alter the definitions of academic misconduct herein.

i) Cheating.

During the completion of an academic assignment (e.g. quizzes, tests, examinations, artistic works, presentations, or papers), it is dishonest to use, have access to, or attempt to gain access to any and all sources or assistance not authorized by the instructor.

ii) Plagiarism.

Plagiarism is the act, intentional or not, of misrepresenting the work, research, language or ideas of another person (published or unpublished) as one’s own. An assignment, or part of an assignment, that fails to acknowledge source material through an appropriate academic discipline’s citation conventions for quotation, paraphrase, and summary also constitutes plagiarism.

iii) Collusion.

Collusion is the collaboration of two or more individuals in either giving or receiving assistance not authorized by the instructor for the completion of an academic assignment.

iv) Falsification.

Falsification is the misrepresentation of academic work or records. Falsification includes, but is not limited to: the fabrication of research, scientific data, or an experiment’s results; providing false information regarding an academic assignment, including reasons for absence, deadline extension or tardiness; the tampering with grade or attendance records; the forging or misuse of college documents or records; or the forging of faculty or administrator signatures. An assignment or part of an assignment, submitted for academic credit in one course and resubmitted by the student for academic credit in another course without both instructors’ permission also constitutes falsification.

v) Sabotage.

Sabotage is the act of hindering another student’s (or students’) ability to complete an academic assignment. Destruction of college property (e.g. library holdings, laboratory materials, or computer hardware or software) may constitute sabotage.

vi) Other forms of academic misconduct.

The forms of academic misconduct defined above are not exhaustive, and other acts in violation of the Cedar Crest Honor Code or academic standards of integrity may be deemed academic misconduct by an instructor or by the college.

Response to Academic Misconduct

Students who breach the academic standard of integrity—as set forth in the types of academic misconduct specified in the Faculty Handbook, Book 4.B.2.a. — are subject to sanctions imposed by an instructor, a department chair, the provost or the board of trustees. Such sanctions can range from, but are not limited to, the expectation to redo an assignment, a reduction in grade for an assignment or course, or the failure of an assignment or course. Extreme cases of academic misconduct, as determined by the provost or the board of trustees, may result in suspension or expulsion from the college, or the withholding, denial or rescinding of academic degrees.

The initial response to academic misconduct rests with the individual instructor, who is entitled to take into account the student’s degree of academic experience and any prior instances of academic misconduct in the student’s time at the College, when determining the penalty for the offense. If a student withdraws from a course and the instructor discovers academic misconduct, either before or after the withdrawal, an instructor’s grade of “F” for the course supersedes the “W.”

All instructors who determine that a student has breached the academic standard of integrity must report the incident to the provost’s office using the Report of Academic Misconduct and attach relevant evidentiary documentation as appropriate. Instructors encountering a case of academic misconduct may consult with the provost’s office to determine if the student has committed acts of academic misconduct on other occasions.
All instructors are required to include the College’s academic standard of integrity on their course syllabi, as well as information about the response to evidence of academic misconduct and potential sanctions incurred. Upon receiving a Report of Academic Misconduct, the provost’s office will notify the student of the misconduct charge and of her rights and the procedure to appeal the charge and its sanctions.

Appeals to charges of academic misconduct or their sanctions follow the process for appealing academic decisions outlined in the Faculty Handbook, Book 4.C.16. All reported incidents of academic misconduct will be held on record by the provost’s office. The provost’s office is to make an annual report to the faculty on the number and nature of academic misconduct cases that occurred during the year.

Independent Studies

The purpose of an independent study is generally to enable a student to investigate topics not covered in depth in regularly scheduled classes. It is generally assumed that the student has taken some necessary background courses and that she will focus on a topic in some depth. The role of the instructor in such a course is primarily for consultation, advisement and possible collaboration. A student proposing an independent study should be of at least a junior standing with a declared major at the time the independent study will occur. Before proposing an independent study, the student should have explored other avenues for receiving instruction or course credit, including course offerings at other LVAIC institutions, course substitutions chosen in consultation with the student’s advisor and/or the involved department chair, or a proficiency exam or CLEP test if applicable. If an independent study is deemed appropriate by the sponsoring department, the student proposing an independent study must complete and sign the independent study form available from the registrar’s office or at their website, and receive approvals from the sponsoring faculty member, sponsoring department chair, and the Provost. These approvals must be obtained and the paperwork submitted to the Registrar’s office prior to the end of the drop/add period. Foundation courses are not available through Independent Study. No more than 9 credits taken through independent study may be counted towards a student’s total graduation credits. A student may petition the Committee on Undergraduate Education (CUE) for exceptions to this policy.

Matriculation

Matriculation is a student’s formal acceptance as a degree candidate at Cedar Crest. Matriculation is required for any student who plans to receive financial aid and/or declare an academic major. Students intending to complete a degree are matriculated upon entry.

The date of the first day of the first semester a student attends class is the date of matriculation. This date of matriculation is important if students find it necessary to interrupt their studies at Cedar Crest. If matriculated students request and are granted an official leave of absence of up to three calendar years, they are not required to re-apply for matriculation when they re-enroll at Cedar Crest.

The date of matriculation determines the liberal arts curriculum requirements under which students will graduate unless they choose to graduate according to provisions enacted by the faculty and stipulated in the current catalog.
In the event that a course section reaches its enrollment maximum, matriculated students are given preference over non-matriculated students.

Off-Campus Study

Internships: The Career Planning Office offers many internship opportunities for sophomores, juniors, and seniors. The main outcome of the internship program is to have students integrate real-world experiences with their academic work. Students may even be able to earn college credit. Internship experiences increase students’ personal and career growth through interpersonal and intellectual challenges, acquisition of practical skills, and exposure to related career fields. Under the supervision of a faculty member, the organization's representative, and the Career Planning Office, students gain related experiences which will help them to be more competitive when conducting their job search or when applying for graduate school. For more information on internship procedures and requirements, refer to Internship Guidelines,– a publication available in the Career Planning Office and on the Career Planning home page on the Cedar Crest College website or on My CedarCrest. All students planning to participate in the internship program are encouraged to attend an internship seminar and must complete Internship Contract forms, also available in the Career Planning Office.

Alumnae Museum: Paid internship positions are also available on campus through the College's Alumnae Museum. Located in Curtis Hall, the Cedar Crest Alumnae Museum preserves the history of Cedar Crest College and fosters an appreciation of the history of women. Opened in conjunction with the College's 125th anniversary, the museum collects and preserves memorabilia and other items of importance to the College. Students work as paid interns (and sometimes as paid museum associates) to plan exhibitions using fashions and memorabilia collected since the College's founding in 1867. Students gain a sense of history of the College as well curatory techniques that are applicable in the larger museum community. For more information on internships with the Alumnae Museum, contact the Cedar Crest Alumnae Office at 610-606-4609.

LVAIC Cross Registration: Through the Lehigh Valley Association of Independent Colleges (LVAIC), the course offerings and library holdings of five other area private colleges are available to Cedar Crest students. Degree-seeking matriculated upper-class women and non-freshmen in good academic standing may register at other LVAIC institutions for courses not available to them on their home campus. Cross-registration for full-time traditional students is at no additional cost in the Fall and Spring semesters. All Cedar Crest students may use any of the LVAIC libraries at no extra charge. Participating institutions in addition to Cedar Crest include DeSales University, Lafayette College, Lehigh University, Moravian College and Muhlenberg College.

Hawk Mountain: Courses are offered at the 2,000-acre Hawk Mountain Sanctuary through an affiliation between Hawk Mountain and the Cedar Crest College biological sciences department.
Students planning to earn academic credit should register through Cedar Crest College. Other interested students should call Hawk Mountain directly at 610-756-6961.

Study Abroad: The Office of Global Initiatives & International Programs encourages students to take advantage of the many exciting opportunities available for study abroad. Students interested in study abroad should plan to attend a study abroad information session or contact Mary Anne Kucserik at mkucser@cedarcrest.edu to set up an appointment to discuss their options. Students will need to work closely with the Office of Global Initiatives & International Programs to choose programs, get the necessary approval and make provisions for credit transfer. In the past few years, Cedar Crest students have enrolled in programs in Australia, England, France, Italy, Ireland, Japan, Mexico, Poland, South Korea and Spain. Full-time Cedar Crest College students may apply for study abroad scholarships, ranging from $250 to $2,500. The Office of Global Initiatives & International Programs also assists students with applications to national scholarship competitions like Fulbright, Boren and Gilman for study and/or research abroad.

Study abroad at approved institutions: Matriculated students interested in study abroad at approved institutions shall consult first with their faculty advisor and/or major Department Chair. The student shall complete the International Programs Approval form with all appropriate signatures, prior to attending the semester abroad. Forms are available in the Office of Global Initiatives & Global Programs, located in Curtis Hall.
Credit is transferable if the grade is “C” or better. Quality points are not transferred and the grade is not computed into the cumulative average. The student is responsible for requesting an official transcript to be sent to the Cedar Crest Registrar’s Office upon completion of the program.

Prizes and Awards

Alumnae Prize: Given by the Alumnae Association to the member of the graduating class who throughout her college life has shown outstanding qualities of cooperation and responsibility and has contributed unselfish service to the College.

Reuben J. Butz Prize: Given in memory of Dr. Reuben J. Butz, for many years a member of the Board of Trustees, by his daughters, Mary Butz Leister ‘26 and Ruth Butz Dent ‘37, to the student in the senior class who has exerted the best influence in her college life and association.

Frank M. Cressman Prize: Given by Dr. Frank M. Cressman, Life Trustee, to the senior who, having begun her college work at Cedar Crest and having done most of it here, has attained the highest average during the four years, including credits and grades earned at other institutions under such programs as the Washington Semester and Junior Year Abroad.

Ferrara Johnson Leadership Prize: Given to the graduating senior who has actively participated in leadership activities on and/or off campus, executed her duties as an active participate in a club or organization and in community service with excellence, and has been dedicated to improving the skills of herself and the membership through attendance at leadership and/or professional workshops.

Mary L. Romig Prize: Given to the student whose personal characteristics best exemplify those that were the hallmark of Mary L. Romig: cheerfulness, concern for others and initiative.
Cynthia Fischer Wahl Award: Given by family, friends, and classmates in memory of Cynthia Fischer Wahl ’57 to a senior who is an honor student and who has shown leadership in school and student activities.
Freshman Valedictory Award: Given by the Alumnae Association to the freshman, returning as a sophomore, who has earned the highest academic average during her freshman year.

Art

Howard Agar Memorial Prize: Given to a senior in any discipline who has demonstrated significant ability in the studio arts.

Ruth Rebecca Ayres Junior Award: Given in memory of Ruth Rebecca Ayers '39, to the rising senior who, in her three years at Cedar Crest, has made the most significant contributions to the arts.

Athletics

Nellie Manges Scholar Athlete Award: This award, named for Dean of Student Emertis Nellie M. Manges, is presented to the student-athlete who graduates with the highest grade-point average and has competed in at least three seasons of competition with one year being her senior year.

Biology

Beta Beta Beta Award: Given by the Theta Psi Chapter of Beta Beta Beta to the senior concentrating in biology who has achieved academic excellence and has made substantial contributions to Tri Beta and the department of biological sciences.

Elizabeth Clewell Epp Prize: Given by Ronald Epp in memory of Elizabeth Hausman Clewell Epp ’64, an accomplished clinical microbiologist, scientific researcher and university health sciences educator. This prize supports an off campus junior or senior who best exemplifies Elizabeth’s spirit of scientific inquisitiveness, leadership and wide-ranging competencies in the biological sciences and their respective histories.

Kent Fitzgerald Prize in Neuroscience: Given in honor of Kent Fitzgerald, the second director of Cedar Crest College's Neuroscience program in the Department of Biological Sciences. This award is given to the senior majoring in Neuroscience whose academic excellence and commitment to campus life, including community service, best reflect Dr. Fitzgerald's ideals.

J. Robert Halma Prize: Given in memory of J. Robert (“Bob”) Halma, Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences for 37 years. Professor Halma was a noted and respected expert on the natural history and geology of the Lehigh Valley and the Pocono Mountains, as well as an accomplished artist and illustrator. This award is given to the senior whose academic work and community engagement best reflect Professor Halma's ideals of scientific scholarship and stewardship of the environment.

Hausman Family Stewardship Prize: Given by Ronald Epp in memory of the Cedar Crest College alumnae who originally resided in the residence now occupied by the College’s president: Mary Frances Hausman Berkemeyer ’30, Dorothy Hausman Clewell ’33, Elizabeth Hausman Watson ’38 and Elizabeth Hausman Epp ’64. This award is given to the senior whose academic achievement, community engagement and conservation advocacy focused student attention on goals historically envisioned by President William F. Curtis and (according to Educating the Next Generation of Leaders) is no less relevant today. That is, “to sustain the natural beauty of the campus and make modest improvements that will enhance physical space for the campus community.

Donald E. Morel Award in Nuclear Medicine Technology: Given to the student who has achieved academic excellence in the clinical year.

Noble/Baird Scientific Award: Given to the senior who demonstrates outstanding accomplishment and shows promise for a career in medicine.

Business Administration

Association of Certified Fraud Examiners: Given by Lehigh Valley Chapter of the Association of Certified Fraud Examiners, to the senior who has shown outstanding achievement in accounting and auditing with a focus on forensic accounting and fraud examination.

Institute of Internal Auditors Award: Given by the Institute of Internal Auditors to the senior who has shown outstanding achievement in accounting and auditing.

Institute of Management Accountants Award: Given by the Lehigh Valley Chapter of the National Association of Accountants to a senior who has achieved excellence in accounting.

Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants Award: Given by the Pennsylvania Institute of Certified Public Accountants to the senior who has achieved excellence in accounting.

Sally Turner Weigel Award: Given by her family in memory of Sally Turner Weigel, Class of 1954, to the senior business administration major who has the highest grade-point average and who has done most of her work at Cedar Crest College.

Christina M. Snopek Prize: Given in memory of Christina M. Snopek, Class of 1995, by family and friends, to two senior members of the continuing education program who have done most of their work at Cedar Crest College and who are business administration majors with an interest in banking or finance or who are interested in pursuing a master’s degree in business.

Chemistry

American Chemical Society Award: Given by the Lehigh Valley Section of the American Chemical Society to the senior who has attained the highest average in chemistry.

Communication

Communication Award: Given by the Communication Program to the senior who has achieved distinction in Communication.

The Crestiad Award: Given by the Communication Program to the senior who has made the greatest contribution to advancing The Crestiad by dedicating her time and energy to improving and maintaining the integrity of the student-run campus newspaper.

Education

Edward B. Deery Award: Given by colleagues and friends in memory of Dr. Edward B. Deery, professor of education and chairman of the education department 1958-1970, to the senior in elementary education who has indicated the greatest promise of success as an elementary school teacher.

Howard Klopp Award: “Shining Apple Award” To be presented each year during American Education Week to an outstanding teacher in Lehigh or Northampton County.

Anne Biddle Pullinger Award: Given in memory of Anne Biddle Pullinger, Class of 1929, by her nephew, E. Ellsworth McMeen III, to the senior in secondary education who has indicated the greatest promise of success as a secondary school teacher.

Ethics

The Samuels Ethics Award: Given to a sophomore student who best personifies the characteristics of honor and integrity, character, moral responsibility, innate goodness and kindness.

Forensic Science

The Outstanding Forensic Science Senior Award: The award is presented to the outstanding senior in the Forensic Science program. The award is based on excellence in academics, active participation in the Forensic Science Student Organization and professional involvement.

The Forensic Science Graduate Student Award: is awarded to the second year student in the Master of Science in Forensic Science Program who has the highest GPA, completed all course work, and successfully defended his/her master’s thesis.

Department of History, Literature, and Languages

Holstrom History Merit Prize: Awarded by the history department to the senior who has shown outstanding ability, interest and enthusiasm in the study of history.

Helen S. Weinberger Prize: Given in memory of Helen S. Weinberger, Class of 1924, to the senior history major who has received the highest academic average in the junior and senior years.

Margaret M. Bryant Prize: Given by the Department of History, Literature, and Languages to the senior going on to graduate school in the field of humanities who has achieved distinction in scholarship and shows great promise.

The Humanities Prize: Given by the Department of History, Literature, and Languages to the senior who has demonstrated outstanding and imaginative performance in the humanities.
The Senior Essay Prize in English: Given by the English Program to the senior English major who submits the best essay written for a class in the major.

Mathematical and Information Sciences

Paul V. Kunkel Award: Given in memory of Paul V. Kunkel, member and chairman of the mathematics department from 1935 to 1967, to an outstanding senior.

Nursing

The Gloria Arnold Memorial Prize for Nursing: Given by the family of Gloria Arnold, a long-time resident of Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, to honor young women who wish to pursue a career in the nursing field, The Gloria Arnold Memorial Prize for Nursing shall be awarded to a traditional student entering her third year of college study who has demonstrated commitment and promise to enter the nursing field upon graduation. The recipient shall be selected based on a combination of academic merit and financial need with the intent that this prize offers encouragement and financial assistance during a key year of her experience.

Lillian S. Brunner Award: Given by the Department of Nursing, through the Lillian S. Brunner Endowment Fund, to the senior nursing major who has demonstrated general excellence in nursing.
Lillian Brunner Master of Science in Nursing Award: is presented to the graduating student in the Master of Science in Nursing program who has exemplified the highest standards of graduate level scholarship through exceptional writing, scholarly discourse and the translation of current best evidence into nursing practice.

Haff Award: Given by the Haff Hospital Nurses Association in memory of Dr. Donald Haff and in honor of Dorothea Wilker Haff, Class of 1934 to the member of the junior class with the highest academic average in nursing.

The Nightingale Award: Established to recognize the graduating nursing senior who demonstrates scholarship, outstanding clinical performance and commitment to the nursing profession.
Olga Ripic Award: Given in memory of Olga Ripic (a graduate of Allentown School of Nursing), by her husband, to the graduating senior nursing student who has demonstrated both scholarship and leadership over the two years of nursing education at Cedar Crest.

Cecilia C. Ryan Memorial Award: Given by family, colleagues and friends in memory of Cecilia C. Ryan, Class of 1926, a member of the Cedar Crest faculty for 45 years, to the senior R.N. student in the nursing program with the highest cumulative average.

Theta Rho Award: Given by the Theta Rho Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau International, Honor Society of Nursing, to the graduating senior who has demonstrated exceptional abilities in the areas of nursing scholarship, leadership and research.

Anne O. Winkler Award: Given by colleagues and friends in honor of Dr. Anne O. Winkler, Professor of nursing and first chairman of the nursing department (1974-1986), to the senior who has demonstrated outstanding achievement in nursing theory and practice and has displayed leadership potential while in the nursing program.

Nutrition

Allen Center for Nutrition Award: Given to a graduating senior who has achieved academic excellence and is a highly motivated self-starter.

Performing Arts

Alpha Psi Omega Award: The Alpha Psi Omega Award is given by Alpha Psi Omega, the national theatre honorary chapter Iota Gamma, the performing arts department and The Friends of Cedar Crest Performing Arts to a member of the graduating senior class who has demonstrated excellence in the performing arts.

Buskin Award: The Buskin Award is given by The Buskin Society, the performing arts department and The Friends of Cedar Crest Performing Arts to the graduating member of the senior class who has done the most outstanding work in technical theatre or stage managing.

Beverly S. Logan Prize: Given by family and friends in memory of Beverly S. Logan ’81, who died at the age of 33 of breast cancer, to a senior preparing for graduation in the coming year who has made the greatest contribution to advancing the cause of music at Cedar Crest College by example, performance or initiative, and who, most importantly, is a multidimensional achiever.

Linda Fechnay Baas Award: The Linda Fechnay Baas Award is given in memory of Linda Fechnay Baas, founding director of the Forensics Speech Team. The award is given to a forensic speech student who best exemplifies Linda's spirit of good will, optimism and unconditional support for the forensics team and its members through participation, peer coaching and dedication to excellence in speech.

The Carol Welton Kelly Dance Award for Movement Studies: Given in memory of Carol Welton Kelly, the first director of the dance program at Cedar Crest College, to an outstanding senior dance student who exhibited promise in human movement exploration from mastering the physical technique to scholarly research in dance and is committed to human movement possibilities though theory and practice.

Wilbur Hollman Award: Given in memory of Wilbur Hollman, professor of Music 1943 - 1983, to the Senior Cedar Crest Applied Music student in piano or voice who has demonstrated outstanding performing abilities.

Psychology

Ellis Honig Memorial Award: Established in honor of the late Dr. Ellis Honig who taught in Cedar Crest College’s Department of Psychology for nearly 30 years. This award is given to a graduating senior in recognition of outstanding service contributions to the department and community, such as: organizing psychology club activities, participating in interdisciplinary campus events or programs, serving in a leadership capacity in on- or off-campus practicum experiences, providing service to a community organization, mentoring others, and/or actively serving as a role model for positive social change.

Senior Academic Excellence Award: This award is given to the graduating psychology major student who has completed at least 60 academic credits at Cedar Crest College, and has an outstanding cumulative grade point average and impressive academic record. Selection for this award is made by the Psychology Department on the basis of GPA and academic related achievements, such as internships, research projects, or other outstanding professional contributions.

Religion

Fogel Prize: Established by Miss Minnie G. Fogel, Class of 1891, in memory of her parents, the Reverend Dr. Edwin J. and Jennie E. Fogel, to be given to the member of the senior class who in her entire college curriculum has been outstanding in study and religious influence.

Prize in Religion: Given by the Penn Northeast Conference of the United Church of Christ to the student who has received the highest grades in the study of religion.

Social Work

Catherine M. Cameron Anthropology Prize: Presented in the memory of Dr. Cate Cameron, Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at Cedar Crest, this prize is awarded to the graduating senior who in her academic career has best exemplified a commitment to cultural competence through participation in academic and co-curricular endeavors that promote the development of an international community worldview.

Lecie G. Machell Prize in Social Work: Given to the senior social work major who has demonstrated outstanding achievement both in the classroom and in field work experience.

Proficiency Examinations

Proficiency Examinations: Information about the availability of proficiency examinations for specific Cedar Crest courses is available in the Registrar’s Office, along with application forms. Students must be enrolled and matriculated at Cedar Crest to apply for proficiency exams. A nonrefundable fee of $30 per credit attempted is charged for each proficiency examination. For courses that require a laboratory or clinical assessment, there may be an additional fee, payable with application. Students cannot receive credit for the writing two, technology, and information literacy college wide requirements by taking a proficiency examination. If a student fails a proficiency examination, it may not be repeated.

College Level Examination Program Testing: The College-Level Examination Program (CLEP) awards college credit to students demonstrating achievement in a subject by means of a computer-based exam. Students who have not previously transferred in four credits during the final 30 credits may transfer up to four CLEP credits within the final 30 credits.

Cedar Crest awards credit for specific examinations, department-approved, that are applicable to the liberal arts curriculum when students receive the minimum required score. Students should refer to the minimum score requirements located on the Academic Services section of MyCedarCrest.

The following subject examinations have been approved by departments for transfer credit:

* Student may petition the Director of International Languages for credit for SPA 201/202 in place of 101/102+CLEP exams in languages do not fulfill the global studies liberal arts curriculum requirement.

Credit for Experiential Learning: Cedar Crest awards up to 12 credits for experiential learning. Experiential learning is knowledge acquired outside of the formal classroom. To apply, a student must be matriculated and have at least nine earned Cedar Crest credits. Interested students should contact the Adult and Graduate Admissions Office for further information on credit for experiential learning. Credit for experiential learning is available only when all other methods of awarding credit are not applicable. There is a non-refundable $50.00 application fee. The per credit rate is computed at 50% of the current evening/weekend rate.

Transfer Policy

Maximum Credit Transfer to the College and Final 30-Credit Residency Requirement

After matriculation, a student may transfer a maximum of 18 credits to Cedar Crest, provided the student has not transferred the maximum number of credits allowed (see below).Courses completed at LVAIC institutions (DeSales University, Lafayette College, Lehigh University, Moravian College, or Muhlenberg College) do not count as transfer credits. A student may not transfer any credit to Cedar Crest if within 26 of the last 30 credits of completing the required credit total for graduation. The Registrar can review transfer petitions from students who matriculated at Cedar Crest as freshmen, have completed more than the required credit total for graduation, and have transferred in fewer than 18 credits.

Traditional students transferring from two-year institutions may transfer up to 60 credits prior to matriculation. Students with an A.S. or an A.A. degree from a regionally accredited institution may transfer up to 68 credits. Once credit has been awarded, it may not be removed from the transcript. Students transferring from four-year institutions may transfer up to 90 credits prior to matriculation. Once the maximum number of transfer credits has been reached, they may not transfer any additional credits once they have begun their final 30 credits at Cedar Crest. CLEP credits are considered transfer credits.

Students holding a degree from regionally accredited two-year or four-year institutions will be credited with having satisfied the equivalent of the College’s general education requirements; this policy applies to students holding associate of arts, associate of science, bachelor’s, master’s, and doctoral degrees. Students who hold a degree from a four-year non-domestic institution evaluated by a transfer evaluation service recognized by the College (such as World Education Services, Education Credentials Evaluators, or Academic Credentials Evaluation Institute) will be credited with having satisfied the equivalent of the College’s general education requirements; these policies apply to students holding bachelor’s, master’s, or doctoral degrees, or the non-domestic equivalents of such degrees. The Registrar is responsible for verifying student fulfillment of this requirement through a review of each applicant’s official transcript.

Application for transfer of academic credit after matriculation

Study at non-LVAIC institutions:

Matriculated students interested in studying at another institution shall consult first with their faculty advisor and/or major Department Chair. In order to verify transfer course equivalency, the student should complete the Permission for Transfer of Credit form that is available both in the Registrar’s Office and online. The Permission for Transfer of Credit form will require signatures of a faculty advisor, Department Chair, and the Registrar. The form should be completed prior to taking the course.

Credit is transferable if the grade is “C” or better. Quality points are not transferred, and the grade is not computed into the cumulative average. The student is responsible to request an official transcript be sent to Cedar Crest Registrar’s Office upon completion of the course.

Study abroad at approved institutions: Matriculated students interested in study abroad at approved institutions shall consult first with their faculty advisor and/or major Department Chair. The student shall complete the International Programs Approval form with all appropriate signatures, prior to attending the semester abroad. Forms are available in the Office of Global Initiatives & Global Programs, located in Allen House, or the Registrar’s Office.

Credit is transferable if the grade is “C” or better. Quality points are not transferred and the grade is not computed into the cumulative average. The student is responsible to request an official transcript be sent to the Cedar Crest Registrar’s Office upon completion of the program.

Credit for Prior Learning: Cedar Crest College offers matriculated students several avenues through which to identify and evaluate learning that has taken place in private study and other out-of-classroom experiences, with the possibility of receiving academic credit for it. These avenues include College Entrance Examination Board Advanced Placement Tests (see details in admissions section of this catalog), proficiency examinations, College Level Examination Program (CLEP) testing, PONSI (National Program on Non-Collegiate Sponsored Instruction), DANTES (Defense Activity for Non-Traditional Education Support), and credit for experiential learning. All credits awarded through these avenues are regarded as transfer credits. The student awarded such credit is subject to the rule that she must take her last 26 of her last 30 credits at Cedar Crest.

Voluntary Separation From The College

Official Leave of Absence: Degree-seeking (matriculated) students who find it necessary to interrupt their college studies for a term or more must apply for an official leave of absence if they wish to return under the same liberal-arts education requirements. Within 3 years of the student's official date of separation, the student must have accomplished one of the following steps: return to classes, submit a letter of intent to register for the upcoming term, register for the upcoming term, or request an extension of the leave of absence. Leave of Absence Requests are processed on MyCedarCrest via the Withdrawal Application; the Registrar approves requests for leaves of absence. Withdrawals from individual courses are not considered official leaves of absence.

The first day of class attendance, in the case of traditional students, or the date of the acceptance letter as a degree candidate, in the case of SAGE students, is the date of matriculation. This date is important if a student finds it necessary to interrupt her studies at Cedar Crest.

Official leaves of absence of less than three years permit students to graduate according to the general education requirements in effect at the time they matriculated. With approval from the department in which they are majoring, students may be permitted to graduate according to major requirements listed in the College Catalog and in effect at the time they matriculated at the College. Students may also choose to graduate according to policies and curricular changes enacted by the faculty and found in the most current catalog.

If matriculated students request and are granted an official leave of absence of up to three calendar years, they are not required to reapply for matriculation when they re-enroll at Cedar Crest. Students who re-enter the College after a leave of absence greater than three years, an unofficial withdrawal, or any absence not formally approved, as described above, must meet the general liberal arts requirements and major requirements in effect at the time of their re-enrollment in order to graduate.

Official Withdrawal from Cedar Crest: In order to withdraw officially from Cedar Crest College, all withdrawing students must complete an exit interview, which begins the withdrawal application on My Cedar Crest. Official withdrawal prior to the official deadline for course withdrawal will result in all coursework in progress being graded W (not computed into average). Withdrawal after the official deadline for course withdrawal requires completion of the process for administrative withdrawal. Unofficial withdrawal from the College at any time may result in all coursework in progress being graded F. If the student re-enters the College to continue the major after a withdrawal, the student will graduate according to general education requirements and major requirements in effect at the time of re-enrollment.

Re-admission Policy: Students who apply for readmission to Cedar Crest College after a separation of at least five years may elect, upon readmission, to retain all of their prior grades or to begin their academic career anew, retaining none of their prior grades.

Students who have been dismissed previously from the College must petition for readmission. Students who have been dismissed for poor academic performance must remain separated from the College for at least one calendar year before reapplying for admission. Students who have been dismissed for poor academic performance must complete 12 graded Cedar Crest credits with a "C" or better to be eligible for readmission.

Withdrawal from a Course

Course Withdrawal: The deadline for course withdrawal occurs at 4:00 PM of the established date for a course as indicated below. In courses with significant group participation and when success is dependent on the participation of each student, instructors may set withdrawal dates earlier than the established date for a course. Any exceptions to established course withdrawal deadlines will be explicitly indicated in a course's syllabus. When a student withdraws from a course after the drop/ad period, but before the official withdrawal deadline, a grade of "W" will be recorded on the student's permanent record and a processing fee will be assessed for each course. The grade will not be computed into the cumulative average. Withdrawing from one or more classes may affect a student's satisfactory academic progress requirement for receipt of financial aid; the student should visit the Student Financial Services Office for information. Dates for the withdrawal deadlines will be posted in the college calendar. If a student withdraws from a course and the instructor discovers academic misconduct either before or after the withdrawal, an instructor's grade of "F" for the course supersedes the "W".

Course Withdrawal Deadlines by course schedule format*

*In the case of exceptions to the established withdrawal deadlines, and for course schedule formats not listed above, the dates will be established by the Department Chair, in consultation with the course instructor and Registrar.

Withdrawal after the deadline

After the withdrawal deadline, students who experience extenuating non-academic circumstances beyond their control may petition for a late withdrawal by submitting a Late Withdrawal Appeal form to the Director of Student Success and Retention. Submission of the appeal form does not guarantee approval. If the appeal is granted, a "W" will appear on the student's transcript for the requested class(es) and will not affect the student's cumulative grade point average. Late withdrawal from one or more classes may affect a student's satisfactory academic progress requirement for receipt of financial aid; the student should visit the Student Financial Services office for information. It is also the student's responsibility to communicate with their academic advisor to determine any potential effects the withdrawal may have on their academic progress.


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