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CONTACT:
School of Adult and Graduate Education
Blaney Hall 105
sage@cedarcrest.edu
610-740-3770

Dianne M. Babbitt, Ph.D.
Director, Master of Science in Integrative Exercise Science
Chair, Health Sciences
Assistant Professor
610-606-4666 ext. 3609
dianne.babbitt@cedarcrest.edu

Course Descriptions

Curriculum (36 credits)

Introduction to Research and Statistics (3 credits)

This course introduces students to exercise science research methods and statistical analysis as they shape a framework for their thesis research through development of the Introduction and Review of Literature chapters. This course serves, in part, as the first of three thesis development courses.

Applied Exercise Physiology (3 credits)

This course addresses the advanced principles and applications of exercise physiology. Both the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the cardiovascular, pulmonary, musculoskeletal, and metabolic systems are examined. The interdependence of each of these system’s physiological responses in applying exercise training for health, performance, and rehabilitation are explored. This course is comprised of both lecture classes and laboratory experiences.

Exercise Testing and Programming (3 credits)

This course provides the foundations for various modes of exercise testing in order to design an effective exercise program for development of a Healthy Lifestyle Program (HeLP) through the levels of exercise performance. Evidenced-based principles in developing exercise programs with measureable outcomes are explored for aerobic, anaerobic, combination aerobic/anaerobic, and resistance training activities. Development of basic 12-lead ECG arrhythmia interpretation skills is an integral element within the course.

Applied Biomechanics (3 credits)

This course examines the science of human movement within the framework of musculoskeletal anatomy and biomechanical principles foundational to the fluidity of movement in exercise and sport performance. The relationships among structure, function, and force are applied to understand normal movement and apply that knowledge to the limitations and impairment of pathological motion. 

Human Performance Practicum (3 credits)

This course provides students the opportunity to practice applied exercise physiology skills under the guidance of experienced professionals currently working in focused areas of Exercise Science. Course content is divided under several units that include nutrition for exercise and sport, exercise testing for apparently healthy individuals through sport performance, and designing exercise-training programs for specific individual outcomes. The units are scheduled concurrently with relevant exercise science courses.

Pathophysiology of Chronic Diseases (3 credits)

This course examines the effect of primary and secondary cardiac, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases on physiological and physical function. The role of chronic exercise training in the prevention and/or rehabilitation of these disorders is evaluated and analyzed. Medical interventions in the treatment of these pathologies as they relate to exercise rehabilitation will be presented.

Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription (3 credits)

This course expands on the knowledge and skills acquired in Exercise Testing and Programming. A thorough examination of the principles and practices for safe diagnostic exercise testing and prescription in clinical populations (cardiac, pulmonary, musculoskeletal, and metabolic disorders) are presented through lectures and explored through a case study format. Advancement of 12-lead ECG interpretation skills is an integral element within the course.

Clinical Exercise Practicum (3 credits)

This course provides students the opportunity to practice applied clinical exercise physiology skills under the guidance of experienced professionals currently working in focused areas of clinical exercise science. Course content is divided under several units that include health/medical history, clinical health assessment, blood chemistries, cardiopulmonary diagnostic exercise testing, and exercise prescription for clinical populations. The units are scheduled concurrently with relevant exercise science courses.

Applied Research (3 credits)

This course supports the student in advancing their thesis research through the development of a collaborative research plan. Students will create their Methods chapter and execute the collection of data relevant to their thesis projects. This is the second of three courses culminating in a thesis.

Organizational Management of Exercise Programs and Facilities (3 credits)

This course addresses the elements of managing safe and effective exercise programs and facilities. Topics include appropriate staffing, equipment, legal considerations, personnel management, marketing, and professional and ethical decision-making.

Clinical Internship (3 credits)

This course provides students with a capstone practical experience to engage in a work-based learning experience as an extension to the knowledge and skills acquired during the didactic and practical courses in the Integrative Exercise Science program. Students will rotate through diverse clinical areas that utilize exercise as a medium for diagnosis and treatment at multiple local and regional medical facilities.

Thesis Seminar (3 credits)

This seminar course is designed to foster analysis and critique of thesis data among the collaborative research team. Students will complete their theses by writing the Results and Discussion chapters, presenting their final thesis project to the thesis committee, and submitting a final thesis document. This is the concluding course of three culminating in a research thesis project.